Entertainment

Latinos Brought Glam And Lots Of Spanish To The 2019 Oscars

If you’re a fan of movies and a lover of all-things Latino, the 91st Academy Awards did not disappoint. Yes, the Hollywood industry is still lacking representation, especially when it comes to Latinos. However, there’s no denying that we are here, and the Oscars last night in LA proved that 100 percent.

Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma” — and its ten nominations — is a big reason that Mexico and Latinos shined this year at the Oscars. Our favorite Latino stars were also on hand and brought so much light, love, and of course, stylish glam.

Jennifer Lopez showed up in a disco-style dress.

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Lopez, wearing a Tom Ford gown, looked absolutely magical in the dress. In all honesty, however, it was too shimmery. The dress was blinding on the red carpet and when she was presenting alongside actor Chris Pine she practically made him disappear. Love the glamour, but it was a little much

Tessa Thompson looked ravishing in this gorgeous Chanel black dress.

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She was stunning. Period.

Every person in “Roma” was also serving looks at the Oscars.

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With so much attention going toward Yalitza Aparicio, Alfonso Cuarón, Marina de Tavira, it’s nice to see the rest of the cast enjoying the festivities.

While on the red carpet, Diego Luna said he loved that he heard so many people speaking Spanish.

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We love this picture of Luna, Aparcio, and her mother. Luna interviewed Aparacio very recently, and the two both share the experience of working on a Cuarón film.

Javier Bardem rocked out during a Queen performance.

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Queen — fronted by Adam Lambert — opened the Oscars by performing “We Are The Champions.” The main person to be rocking out during the mini concert was Bardem who was literally headbanging.

Bardem also presented Best Foreign Film and spoke — in Spanish — about the importance of learning from other cultures.

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We were all impressed by Bardem’s flawless speech, but actress Angela Basset was clearly more impressed.

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-VerseSpider” won Best Animated Feature

“I grew up in a bilingual household in the bilingual city of Miami where you hear Spanish all over the place, and it’s not particularly remarkable,” producer and co-writer Phil Lord said in an interview with Remezcla. “It was important for us to hear Spanish and not necessarily have it subtitled. It’s just part of the fabric of Miles’ community and family life.”

Luna brought even more Spanish while presenting one of the Best Picture nominations — for “Roma” of course.

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Luna walked on stage and began speaking in Spanish alongside chef José Andrés. Luna said in Spanish “the door is now opened and no one will get us out.” Andrés said “Each person’s life is a recipe all on its own with different measures of joy and sadness, struggle and success, love and loss. All of the ingredients are universal.”

Guillermo Del Toro presented Best Director to Alfonso Cuarón.

“Being here doesn’t get old” Cuarón said, who is now a seasoned Oscar winner.

Congrats to all the winners!

READ: Latinos Have A Long History Of Being Nominated At The Academy Awards With Some Major Wins

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Yalitza Aparicio Says She’s Waiting For A Role That Won’t Pigeonhole ‘Because of Appearance”

Entertainment

Yalitza Aparicio Says She’s Waiting For A Role That Won’t Pigeonhole ‘Because of Appearance”

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Since the start of her acting career, Oaxacan actress Yalitza Aparicio has been sure to see that her work helps uphold her community. While many actors on the rise tend to focus on racking up more acting roles and fame, Aparicio has been much more vocal about her desire to focus on her advocacy and work for organizations like Cine Too. What’s more, ensuring that she secures proper representation for Indigenous people like herself.

While Aparicio first made headlines and won our hearts with her performance in the 2018 film Roma the Indigenous actress has yet to appear in another role on screen.

It turns out, it isn’t for a lack of offers.

Speaking with Indie Wire about her career, Aparicio has said that she is taking her time to find a role that properly represents her and her community.

“My objective in my career is to give visibility to all of us who have been kept in the dark for so long,” Aparicio claimed in a recent interview with IndieWire. “The acting projects I’m working on are moving slowly because I’m putting all my efforts in not being pigeonholed because of my appearance.”

Aparicio, who is 26-years-old, was born in Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, rocketed to fame when she took on the role of Cleo in Alfonso Cuarón’s 2018 movie Roma. The film, which was nominated for various Academy Awards followed Aparicio as Cleo a housekeeper who works in a wealthy household in Mexico City’s Colonia Roma. Aparicio’s role brought her praise not just for her skills but for her role in solidifying a much-needed portrayal of Mexico’s Indigenous community.

Still, despite the praise and fame, the role brought her, Aparicio is adamant that her next role will be something greater.

“I come from a community where there’s no movie theater, and as a consequence, the population — especially the children that grow up in those communities — has less of an interest in the cinematic arts. [Cine Too] has the possibility to reach these children and provide an opportunity to instill in them the passion for cinema and teach them about this art form,” she explained in her interview. “I’m conscious that every step I take may open doors for someone else and at the same time it’s an opportunity for society to realize we are part of it and that we are here,”

In her interview, Aparicio points out that while she is very aware that Indigenous filmmakers and allies “have a complicated job because these things can’t be changed overnight,” she is still pushing for real change.

“Wherever I go, I’ll always be proudly representing our Indigenous communities,” she asserted. “We can show people that the only limits are within us.”

Yalitza Sparks A Conversation About The Derogatory Term ‘Prieta’

Things That Matter

Yalitza Sparks A Conversation About The Derogatory Term ‘Prieta’

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Prieta. It might translate literally to brown but the word holds quite a bit of weight in the Mexican community where it is viewed as a racist term for dark-skinned people.

Recently, Roma actress Yalitza Aparicio opened up about having the term used against her as a child and again as she’s obtained celebrity status.

This week, Aparicio spoke out about racism in Mexico in a post called “Recuerdos De Mi México” to her Twitter page and explained why she had reclaimed the word “prieta.”

In a post shared on Twitter, a user by the name of Rosario Estrad @rosario55920512 a poem reclaiming the term prieta read “They call me prieta and think it is an insult. Prieta, like the fertile soil under my bare feet. Prieta, like the night. Prieta, the bronze race.”

“That’s right, I’m brown, pretty brown and with my head held high,” Aparicio wrote in a retweet about the post. “I share this text for those who use this word offensively.

Prieta is a word with different connotations in different cultures and countries.

As Remezcla points out, in Mexico “prieta” is used as a derogatory for Brown or darker-skinned people. The term is most often used by lighter-skinned people and in Caribbean countries and Central America, the term is used in an alternate form “prieto” but still with derogatory undercurrents. Aparicio’s decision to reclaim the word has sparked conversations about whether it is okay for non-Black people (no matter how dark or light) to use or claim the term.

Last month, Aparicio penned a New York Times op-ed about the discrimination she’s been forced to endure in and outside of the Latin American community.

Writing about how her role in Roma gave her a platform that allowed her to speak about racism in the Latin community, Aparicio wrote “At that time, Mexico was experiencing political and social upheaval. National turmoil brought to the fore problems that still persist to this day, namely the normalization of classism, racism, and denigration, along with other forms of segregation and belittlement based on skin color, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or social class.”