Entertainment

As Coachella Weekend Two Starts, Some Want Concertgoers To Respect Those Cleaning Up After Their Day Of Partying

@CourtMejias / Twitter

Coachella is in its second weekend and people are excited about the exceptional lineup. Yet, while most festival-goers enjoy the music and decoration, few pay attention to the people who clean up after the festival ends for the night. Now, Twitter users are spreading the word about the people who make the festival the enjoyable and Instagramable experience it has come to be.

The Desert Sun reports that Coachella Vally farm workers are picking up night shifts to clean up the festival.

Credit: @Eloisalv / Instagram

According to the Desert Sun, some farm workers in the Coachella Valley work their full day in the fields and end the day with a night shift cleaning up the festival grounds. The workers start just after midnight when the last festival-goers leave the grounds and their shift ends at 3:30 a.m. with the grounds perfectly cleaned.

“Like a magic act,” Enriqueta Magaña, the team leader for those working double shifts, told the Desert Sun.

Festival-goers are using social media to give attention to the hard-working people who make the festival the dream getaway it is for all the Instagram posts.

Credit: @riogrande / Twitter

According to the Desert Sun, festival attendees have nothing nice to say to the people cleaning up the grounds of the Coachella festival. The partiers look down on the people working till 3:30 a.m. because their job involves them picking up the trash the partiers throw about.

“They don’t want to be near us,” Magaña told the Desert Sun. “They say, ‘They’re the ones who pick up the trash. They’re dirty.’”

Some concerned Coachella visitors want to make sure that the workers are being properly compensated for the hard and late work.

The Desert Sun reports that Goldenvoice, the company that produces Coachella, sold 250,000 tickets to the 2017 festival. In total, the festival pulled in $114.6 million. The farm workers pulling a second shift to clean the grounds reportedly get paid the minimum wage of $11 an hour.

The manual laborers sacrifice more than just their aching feet and sore backs to do the work. Between the day-long shift on the fields and the festival clean up, the laborers could work up to 48 hours during the three days of the music festival.

“What we do is nothing more than changing the trash bags,” Magaña told the Desert Sun. “This is not tiresome — you do this in your own house.” She added, “it’s tiresome for the people who aren’t used to staying awake past midnight.”

This conversation happens on the backdrop of Latinos finally getting a stronger representation at the festival that takes place in a Latino community.

Credit: @saldivarjolene / Twitter

The community around Coachella is one of hard working Latino laborers. They have provided the produce we eat every day and then turn around and clean up the mess from festival goers to insure a clean and fun experience. The lack of Latino representation at the festival in a place steeped in the culture is disappointing.

Fortunately, this year is giving Latinos a chance to shine in their own community. Specifically, Los Tucanes de Tijuana rocking out at Coachella was one highlight Latinos won’t forget. Now, if only the laborers who make sure the festival grounds are clean and ready for Coachella revelers could get the same respect and support.

READ: This Is Why You Saw Yalitza Aparicio’s Face All Over Coachella

One Again, Twitter Is Divided About A Racial Topic—This Time It’s About A Festival Charging White People More Than PO

Entertainment

One Again, Twitter Is Divided About A Racial Topic—This Time It’s About A Festival Charging White People More Than PO

@AFYDet \ Twitter

Afrofuture Fest, a Detroit-based music festival, thought they had a bright idea when they decided to charge Non-People Of Color $10 more than their Black and Brown participants. Recently, outrage over the charge discrepancies has led users to accuse the festival’s part planners of planning a “reverse Jim Crowe era” event.

Ultimately all of this has led the event to backtrack on their earlier effort to charge people with different skin colors different prices.

The Detroit-based music festival recently debuted ticket prices based on the buyer’s skin color on Eventbrite and the backlash has been severe.

Afrofuture Fest is a Detroit-based event that is being hosted by local art and social collective Afrofuture Youth. According to the Afrofuture Youth website, they have good intentions.

The program aims to provide students with resources that will allow them to craft a “new, more equitable world.” In their attempts to achieve this however the collective planned to host AfroFuture Fest on 3 August by charging people of color and white people different prices. AfroFuture Fest‘s Eventbrite page featured an Early Bird POC Ticket for $10 and an Early Bird NONPOC Ticket for $20.

Of course, it didn’t take long for the differing prices to get picked up and go viral.

According to The Independent, the event’s listing said equality “means treating everyone the same.” and that the event’s “ticket structure was built to ensure that the most marginalized communities (people of colour) are provided with an equitable chance at enjoying events in their own community (black Detroit). Affording joy and pleasure is unfortunately still a privilege in our society for POC and we believe everyone should have access to receiving such.”

News of the event’s charging practices went viral on social media when rapper Tiny Jag pulled out of the event and cited the unequal prices in tickets.

In an interview with CNN, Tiny Jag said she had been unknowingly added to the event but decided to support the collective’s cause by performing, however, once she learned of the prices, Jag said she felt “triggered.” According to JAG, she identifies herself as biracial and group up with a white grandmother.

“I didn’t think we were near that thinking that something like that could be progressive,” she told CNN. “We have never seen hate work, I don’t understand.”

In a Twitter post about the incident, the rapper issued a statement saying that the charges do not “reflect the views of myself or the Tiny Jag team.”

Eventbrite has also spoken out against the charges.

The U.S.-based event management and ticketing website told CNN that they do not “permit events that require attendees to pay different prices based on their protected characteristics such as race or ethnicity.”

They also said that they had notified the creator of the event about the violation and asked that the event’s prices be altered. “We have offered them the opportunity to do this on their own accord; should they not wish to comply we will unpublish the event completely from our site,” Eventbrite told CNN.

Of course, users online have split opinions about the event and the criticism its charges have received.

While many of the complaints about the ticketing prices have come from conservatives, many have been quick to defend the prices saying that the event was attempting to achieve equity.

Others have said that basing prices on skin tone pushes us further away from equality.

As is typical for Twitter, everyone has opinions and what one party finds racist the other finds right.

After all of the backlash, on Sunday evening, Afrofuture Fest tweeted that they had reversed their decision on ticketing prices.

The group said that they had “received threats from white supremacists” who were attacking children with “racist comments” on social platforms.

The ticketing formula has since changed on Eventbrite to include a $20 general admission fee and a “suggested donation for nonPOC.”

This Is Why You Saw Yalitza Aparicio’s Face All Over Coachella

Fierce

This Is Why You Saw Yalitza Aparicio’s Face All Over Coachella

Twitter / @bdelossantos1

Latinx and Latin American artists made history at this year’s Coachella. At the massive music festival in Indio, Calif., heavy-hitters like Cardi B, Selena Gomez, J Balvin, Bad Bunny and Ozuna lit up stages with their Spanish-language bangers. But our musicians weren’t the only ones attracting audiences. Yalitza Aparicio — or rather a cutout of the actress’s face — also gained attention.

According to Remezcla, Jesus Nuñez, a fan of the “Roma star,” brought a giant cardboard cutout of Aparicio’s look from the Oscars to the event. Nuñez, who is the son of Mexican immigrants and was raised in Baja California, was inspired by the indigenous actress’s story of survival and wanted to highlight her in a crowd of tens of thousands.

“The reason why I was inspired to make the sign with the image of Yalitza was because of her story. It doesn’t matter where you’re from or what your culture is, you can achieve a lot of things as long as you propose to do it. Despite all her success, she’s still down to earth,” he told the news site through email.

Aparicio’s presence at Coachella is significant for another reason: real indigenous representation. Attendees of Coachella, and festivals like it, have long been criticized for wearing native headdresses. You know the photos: The almost-always white girl sporting a feathered ornamental covering on her head and getting called out via social media. This time, there was an actual indigenous woman in the crowd, and she was donning a smile and a graceful hand wave.

The cardboard version of the actress was a big hit at the festival, with fans asking to take photos with her. Aparicio’s welcoming grin could be found participating in the La Chona Challenge at Los Tucanes de Tijuana’s performance, taking photos with fans during Mon Laferte’s set and enjoying Bad Bunny’s show.

Stars, they really are just like us.

Read: Latinos Showed Their Power On The Stages Of Coachella 2019

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