Entertainment

La Santa Cecilia Are Covering The Songs That Made Your Parents Cry

There’s a familiar warmth that a place like Mexico City can provide when you’re deep in love — the  rich colors, friendly faces, and lively music can amplify your feelings. If you’ve never had the pleasure of experiencing that joy or tender sadness that love brings when your heart is ripped in two, La Santa Cecilia is showing you exactly what that feels like through their new visual album “Amar Y Vivir.”

New Singles out NOW!! Link in bio!! #AmarYVivir #leñadepirul #LaSantaCecilia #cdmx #boleros #rancheras #bohemios

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The Los Angeles-based band is releasing a new live album that was recorded in 12 different locations in Mexico City, such as the Zócalo and Parque México, and each song will be accompanied by a music video. You know, just like Beyoncé did with “Lemonade,” except “Amar Y Vivir” is more like limón con sal y chile. The entire album covers of classic songs from Mexico and Latin America.

Here’s the album’s title track, which has been recorded by Vicente Fernandez, Julio Jaramillo and Los Angeles Negros:

Credit: LaSantaCeciliaVEVO / YouTube

“‘Amar y Vivir’ is a collection of songs that are very near and dear to our heart, and to the history of the band, and to us as musicians,” vocalist La Marisoul said in a statement to Billboard. “These are the songs that we learned from our parents; the songs we heard at parties. We learned how to play music with these songs, and I learned how to be a singer through these boleros and rancheros. These are the songs that we always return to when we’re in a family gathering or just us amongst the band. These are always the songs we play, enjoy and sing together.”

And, “Leña De Pirul” written by Tomás Méndez.

Credit: LaSantaCeciliaVEVO / YouTube

The Grammy award-winning band haven’t stopped working since their debut album in 2009. In 2014, they won a Grammy for “Treinta Días.” Last year, they released their six album titled “Buenaventura.”

For this new album, La Santa Cecilia is collaborating with with Mexican singer Eugenia León, Mon Laferte of Chile, Comisario Pantera, Rebel Cats, Caña Dulce Caña Brava, and Mariachi de América de Jesús Rodríguez de Hijar.

Here’s a trailer of the entire visual album:

The band is currently on tour in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. On May 19th they play at El Lunario del Auditorio Nacional in Mexico City.

READ: This Music Video For ‘Fast And Furious 8’ Will Make You Want To Pack Your Bags And Visit Cuba

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Things That Matter

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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Dimelo Flow Talks Career Beginnings, Working With Sech, Daddy Yankee and Representing Panamá at The Global Music Stage

Latidomusic

Dimelo Flow Talks Career Beginnings, Working With Sech, Daddy Yankee and Representing Panamá at The Global Music Stage

Welcome to Spotlight, where we do a deep dive in the careers of artists, producers, songwriters and more people making an impact in the Latin music industry.

Dimelo Flow, the Panamanian producer behind hits like “Relación Remix” and “Otro Trago“, talked to us about how he started off as a basketball prospect turned club DJ, and how his love for music led him to become a producer. Now he’s not only working with the biggest names in Reggaeton like Daddy Yankee, J Balvin, and Bad Bunny, but has his sights on making global records and putting Panamá on the map.

Watch the full interview below:

During our Spotlight interview, Dimelo also talked to us about his creative process, knowing exactly how to craft the perfect remix and where to locate each artist to create the perfect synergy on a track.

Dimelo also touched on reinventing his sound and collaborating with fellow Panamian artist Sech for his upcoming album ‘42.’

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The Avengers project cemented Dimelo Flow, Sech, Dalex, Justin Quiles, Feid and Lenny Tavarez as a force in reggaeton and took their careers to new heights. Dimelo said that they are already working on a follow-up to The Academy.

He talked to us about sliding into Tyga’s DM’s and now he wants to produce for mainstream artists, naming his dream collabs to work with Post Malone, Drake, and Travis Scott.

READ: Run Away From That Toxic Relationship with Dalex’s New Single “Feeling”

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