Entertainment

Korean Boy Band BTS Opened A Pop-Up Shop In Mexico City And Fans Were So Thrilled

So BTS is a big deal. And in Mexico it’s no different, the country is home to some seriously dedicated fans.

Chicos and chicas alike are obsessed with the Korean boy band but sadly the group has only given one concert in Mexico City, back in 2015.

So this was the announcement that everyone had been waiting for.

Credit: TheMostWantedMX / Twitter

Though for those not living near CDMX, they were disappointed the collection wouldn’t immediately be available online.

But now the BT21 store is officially open in Mexico City and people are losing their minds.

Credit: @glossjn / Twitter

Many on Twitter we’re anxiously waiting in-line and live-Tweeting the play by play for those of us that couldn’t be there.

There was already a lot of hype leading up to the actual opening.

Credit: BT21 / Instagram

Like they had to tweet out this reminder to stay calm, bring water, and be prepared to wait.

Pretty much everyone agreed that the line for the pop-up shop was bigger than the lines to go to an actual BTS concert.

Now imagine the line at Mexico’s next BTS concert. But it’s obvious their fans in Mexico are dedicated and come hail, sleet, snow, or rain, it wouldn’t matter, they’d still show up in droves.

People were taking photos and posing with whatever they could.

And thankfully, the shop thought ahead and provided plenty of life-size cutouts of each of the singers along with all sorts of cute decorations.

But most were after the dolls created by each member of BTS.

Tata, RJ, Mang, Chimmy, Cooky, Shooky, Koya are the names of the animated characters created by Jungkook, Taehyung, Jimin, Namjoon, Jin, Hoseok and Yoongi, members of the K-Pop band.

Many took to Twitter to share their hauls from the pop-up.

Credit: @BeyondTheSweett / Twitter

How cute is this stuff?!

Some realized that the Mexico City store even had things that other stores didn’t.

Credit: @glossjn / Twitter

Translation: “oooh they have things that they don’t have in the Times Square store! Kinda jealous but Mexico deserves it.”

Many on Twitter were just speechless that a BT21 store had arrived in the Mexican capital.

Credit: @LeslieAhe / Twitter

After nearly four years without a BTS concert in the city, many were shocked that they would open up a shop in the city.

The fact that BTS had chosen Mexico City as the first location for a pop-up in all of Latin America lends some serious cred to the city.

Credit: @music_is_bts / Twitter

The all boy Korean band has only been to Mexico City once before but they’ve played Sao Paulo several times.

Many from outside the country may not have realized but BTS is basically at the level of la Virgen de Guadalupe in terms of fandom.

Credit: @carimegalaxxy / Twitter

And few would actually line up in numbers like they did for this pop-up shop.

Which leaves us wondering, when will BTS do their next show in Mexico?

READ: BTS Is Making Millions Of Dollars On Their Career But Groups Are Sharing Stories Of The Abuse Rampant In The K-Pop Industry

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Mexico City Celebrates Its 500th Birthday Amid A Pandemic And Mounting Violence

Culture

Mexico City Celebrates Its 500th Birthday Amid A Pandemic And Mounting Violence

Most of us are looking to 2021 with optimism, but for Mexico, this upcoming year won’t just be about saying goodbye to 2020. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) says 2021 will be the “year of independence and greatness” for Mexico, celebrating not only 500 years since the founding of Mexico City, but also 200 years since Mexico achieved its independence from Spain.

As Mexico City turns 500, the city faces many challenges and reasons to celebrate.

Pretty much the entire world was waiting for 2021 to arrive, so that we could all say adiós to 2020. But few places were as eager to welcome 2021 as Mexico was.

You see, it was in 1321 that the ancient city of Tenochtitlan (modern day Mexico City) was founded by the Aztecas, in 1521 the city was conquered and rebuilt by Spanish conquistadors, and in 1821 the nation gained independence from Spain. So you can see why 2021 is such a major year for Mexico.

President AMLO presented a plan to commemorate two centuries of Mexico’s Independence, the 700th anniversary of the founding of Mexico-Tenochtitlan and the 500th anniversary of the fall of the city that became the country’s capital city.

“Next year is the year of the Independence and the greatness of Mexico,” the president said, joined by Mexico City Head of Government Claudia Sheinbaum. In a detailed report on the year’s celebrations, IMSS head Zoé Robledo pointed out that the whole program includes 12 national events including tributes to national heroes, commemoration of relevant dates, exhibitions, parades and the traditional Independence celebration known as El Grito. Other events and celebrations are also expected in 65 cities across 32 states, starting on Feb. 14 in Oaxaca and ending on Sept. 30 in Michoacán.

The nation’s capital has been hard hit by the Covid-19 pandemic and faces other serious challenges.

Like many major cities, Mexico City has been severely impacted by the pandemic. It’s the epicenter of the health crisis in Mexico with more than 500,000 confirmed cases and nearly 25,000 deaths. In recent weeks, hospital occupancy has surpassed 90% meaning there’s little to no room for people to be treated. Meanwhile, the government has come under fire for a lack of any economic security to those who have been forced to go without work as the city of more than 20 million people was placed under lockdown. 

In addition to the health crisis, a growing issue of cartel violence has plagued parts of the capitol – a city once thought immune to the cartel wars that rage in other corners of the country. In 2020, violence in the capital broke records with brazen attacks on elected officials and bloody turf wars between long standing gangs and the Cártel Jalisco Nueva Generación.

But the city also has many reasons to be optimistic in 2021.

Mexico City remains the epicenter of progressivism in the country and that can be seen in the many policies put forward in recent months. With a focus on protecting women’s safety and health and empowering the LGBTQ community, Mexico City is emerging as a safe space for some of the country’s most maligned citizens. 

The city is also undergoing a rapid transformation to a greener society with bans on single-use plastics and a move towards greener policies. From the city’s southern districts to its historical center, the city is also seeing major beautification works to help increase its draw to international tourists – of whom the city has come to rely on for the much needed tourist dollar.

“2021 will be a remarkable year for the city — a city that welcomes all and provides a home for people of all ages and nationalities, which has resulted in a unique cultural hybrid,” says Paulina Feltrin, director of marketing and communications at The St. Regis Mexico City. “I hope this becomes another reason for international and domestic travelers to come celebrate with us.”

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There Are Literally No Tampons Available In Mexico City Since They Were Banned For Environmental Reasons

Fierce

There Are Literally No Tampons Available In Mexico City Since They Were Banned For Environmental Reasons

Few people would argue against the fact that tampons are 100% absolutely an essential item. In fact, many governments are trying to make tampons (among other feminine care products) more accessible to women by offering them for free or low-cost.

However, Mexico’s capital city has taken a different approach by outright banning the sale of tampons. The move comes as a second part to Mexico City’s recent ban on single use products for environmental reasons. And although many are applauding the city for taking drastic action to curb the use of wasteful products, many critics point out that the government should of provided alternatives for women.

Mexico City has banned tampons as part of its ban on single use products.

As of this week, it has become impossible to find tampons in any part of Mexico City’s bustling metropolis. The city that’s home to more than 20 million people no longer sales the single-use plastic tampons that so many women have come to rely on.

The ban comes as a result of the ban on single-use plastics that took effect January 1. The newspaper Milenio reported that it was unable to locate the feminine care products anywhere in the capital but noted that they are widely available in neighboring México state, where disposable plastics remain legal.

Mexico City Environment Minister Mariana Robles asserted in January that single-use plastics, among which are disposable cutlery, cups and straws – and tampons with plastic applicators – are “not really essential.”

Alessandra Rojo de la Vega, a Mexico City lawmaker with the Green Party, said that menstrual cups are an “excellent alternative” to tampons, adding that they are environmentally friendly.

“Let’s incentivize their use to reduce contamination,” she said, asserting that the government should distribute them to women free of charge. But those on Twitter had no patience for lawmakers telling women what menstrual products they should and shouldn’t use.

The city’s environmental minister has argued that single-use plastic tampons aren’t really essential.

Despite officials saying that single-use tampons aren’t really essential, many women across the capital clearly disagreed with the “nonessential” classification and have taken to social media to voice their opposition to their prohibition.

“Stop legislating with privilege, tampons are essential products,” one Twitter user said in a post directed to Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum.

“Suggesting the use of a menstrual cup is not the solution,” Twitter user Miss Maple said in a post directed to Mayor Sheinbaum and the Mexico City government.

“I can’t believe how idiotic we are in Mexico,” tweeted Daniela García, a journalist in Nuevo León, above a link to a news report on the absence of tampons on the shelves of Mexico City stores.

“As if women didn’t [already] confront all kinds of problems, now the government imposes a new one on them – no tampons,” tweeted Carlos Elizondo, an academic at the Tec de Monterrey university.

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