Entertainment

People Are Confused How Kevin Spacey Is Joyfully Singing ‘La Bamba’ In Spain After Sexual Assault Case Dropped

Since Massachusetts prosecutors dropped criminal charges against Kevin Spacey for allegedly groping an 18-year-old busboy in Nantucket, Spacey has been doing some international travel. He performed a spoken-word poem in Rome about a boxer making a comeback, a blatant metaphor for what we imagine he hopes for his own acting career.

Then, Sunday night, band Tuna de Derecho de Sevilla shared several videos to their Instagram page of Spacey performing “La Bamba” with the band in the streets of Sevilla.

Apparently, Spacey was at a restaurant at La Plaza Nueva with friends when a member of the band approached him for a photo.

Credit: tunaderechosevilla / Instagram

It was 2 a.m., which, for Spaniards, is about the end of dinnertime and the beginning of a fun night. Band members told People that they went to the bar to sing for a pre-wedding party when they spotted Spacey. Band member Miguel Segura Cabellero told People, “I walked over to him and explained why we were there and asked if we could take a quick photo with him. He said ‘Yes, of course.’ To begin with, everybody was looking at him, but after a while everything became normal.”

At some point during the introduction, Spacey got up and started singing with the band.

Credit: tunaderechosevilla / Instagram

He picked up an instrument and starting strumming along to the tunes of The Beatles’ “Twist and Shout” and “La Bamba.” A crowd started to form, and fans started to dance alongside Spacey as he strummed along, twisted and shouted, and enjoyed the spotlight for a few moments. The band reported that Spacey was at the bar with a few of his friends.

It seems like Spacey is having a grand ole time on his vacation from #MeToo.

Credit: tunaderechosevilla / Instagram

La Tuna Derecho de Sevilla posted several videos to their Instagram Sunday night, captioning the videos with “Buena noche que pasamos en compañía de Kevin Spacey 👏🏻🍺” In other words, ‘it’s a good night when spent in the company of Kevin Spacey.’ Chillingly, that has not been the case for Spacey’s victims.

But Spacey’s alleged bad behavior isn’t confined to American borders.

Credit: @DanB6398 / Twitter

London’s Metropolitan Police have questioned Spacey over six individual allegations of sexual assault starting as far back as 1996. Spacey worked in London as the artistic director of London’s Old Vic Theatre for over ten years. In an internal investigation, the theater found “20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behavior” by the actor.

Spaniards are reportedly seeing Kevin Spacey clubbing in Madrid, and enjoying a true vacation from the bad press and recent criminal charges that were brought and dropped against him earlier this year.

CNN reports that District Attorney Michael O’Keefe said the case was dropped “due to the unavailability of the complaining witness.”

Credit: @tiffany_blewss / Twitter

Heather Unruh, a former Boston TV news anchor, alleged in November 2017 that Spacey groped her 18-year-old son at the bar he was working in Nantucket in 2016. A year later, charges were filed. In January 2019, Spacey pleaded not guilty. The victim told police that he was texting and sending Snpachat messages when Spacey reaching inside his pants and groped his genitals for a solid three minutes. The victim was a busboy at the bar and had approached Spacey for a photo together. He told police that he lied to Spacey and told him he was a 23-year-old college student when he was in fact 18-years-old. The two drank heavily together and then Spacey assaulted him. When Spacey went to use the bathroom, the victim fled.

The day the allegations broke, Spacey took to social media to share a video that he alleges was “in character” as Frank Underwood from “House of Cards.”

Credit: Kevin Spacey / YouTube

“Of course, some believed everything and have just been waiting with bated breath to hear me confess it all,” Spacey said in the video, allegedly in character as Frank Underwood. “They’re just dying to have me declare that everything said is true and that I got what I deserved. Wouldn’t that be easy if it was all so simple? Only you and I both know it’s never that simple, not in politics and not in life. I can promise you this: If I didn’t pay the price for the things we both know I did do, I’m certainly not going to pay the price for the things I didn’t do.”

READ: Brock Turner’s Victim, Who Wrote Of Her Horrifying Rape By A Dumpster In An Impact Statement, Is Publishing A Book

The Jogger Who Groped a Reporter On Live TV Has Been Identfied and Banned From Further Events

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The Jogger Who Groped a Reporter On Live TV Has Been Identfied and Banned From Further Events

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Another day, another woman publicly degraded. If you’re a woman in America, statistically, you’ve more than likely experienced some form of street harassment. Although street harassment is an under-discussed and under-researched topic, thankfully, activists are beginning to shine a light on the pervasive practice that is part of the foundation of rape culture. 

Recently, a video has been making the rounds on social media that clearly illustrates the reality for many women. On Saturday morning, a video was posted to Twitter of WSAV reporter Alex Bozarjian being assaulted on live television. The video shows Bozarjian smiling in front of a crowd of joggers who are running the annual Enmarket Savannah Bridge Run in Georgia. Runners stream behind her, occasionally interrupting her reporting and making goofy faces to the camera. 

But things take a dark turn when one male jogger comes up behind Bozarjian and slaps her on the butt before continuing on his run.

Bozarjian is visibly rattled by the incident, her face appearing shocked as she struggles to regain her composure, stumbling over her words before continuing to do her job. A concerned viewer, Twitter-user @GrrrlZilla, recorded the incident and posted a video of it to her Twitter account. “We watch @WSAV in our house every single morning,” she said in a follow-up Tweet. “Their staff is like extended family to us. I’m furious about this.”

The video quickly made waves on Twitter, accruing over 11 million views, 6,000 retweets and 2,000 comments.

People immediately called for the perpetrator to be identified and charged with assault. Soon enough, Bozarjian addressed the incident on her own Twitter, posting a statement directed at the man who assaulted her: To the man who smacked my butt on live TV this morning: You violated, objectified, and embarrassed me. No woman should EVER have to put up with this at work or anywhere!! Do better. “

Even Robert Wells, the director of the Savannah Sports Council, responded to the video, publicly apologizing to her for her experience. “Alex, what happened today is 100% unacceptable,” he said Bozarjian’s tweet. “You have my assurance we will identify him.”

Soon, the jogger who assaulted Bozarjian was identified by internet sleuths as Georgia man Tommy Callaway, who spends his down-time as a youth minister. 

Savvy internet users discovered his identity by cross-referencing the number on his bib with the Run’s records. On Sunday, the Savannah Sports Council tweeted that they had identified the man and revealed his identity and information to Bozarjian and her news station. The organization also tweeted that they would be banning Callaway from all of their races. 

Additionally, a spokesperson from the Savannah Police Department stated that they talked to Bozarjian and are “definitely going to be working with her in any capacity on how she’d like to move forward with this incident”.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource center, 63% of sexual assaults are not reported to police. And according to The Office of Civil Rights & Sexual Misconduct, there are a myriad of reasons women don’t report assault, the explanations ranging from the fear of the justice system to feeling that the crime was not “serious enough”

Considering the statistics when it comes to women reporting assault, the swift action taken here by officials and authority figures is encouraging. If more authority figures took the suffering of women seriously, there would be a lot less women that are too afraid to come forward with their own stories. 

The outpouring of support on Twitter for Bozarjian was truly inspiring.

People are finally fed up at seeing women being assaulted in front of their eyes and the perpetrators thinking they can get away with it unpunished. 

This person was filled with empathy for the reporter who was violated when she was simply trying to work.

As a viewer, it’s not easy to see a woman coming to terms with her own violation in front of thousands of people.

This person had a few choice words for the Twitter users who claimed that this stunt was “just a joke”:

It’s apologists like this that keep rape culture alive and flourishing.

Some people even took to the Twitter thread to share their own stories of street harassment and assault:

The silver lining to this is that at least people recognize how pervasive abuse like this is.

Arguably what’s most infuriating about this is the audacity of this man’s behavior 

People don’t commit acts like this on camera unless they’ve been getting away with similar behavior for a long time. To him, his actions are normal. 

Uber Says There Were More Than 3,000 Sexual Assaults Reported In Its App Last Year And Here’s What They Plan To Do

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Uber Says There Were More Than 3,000 Sexual Assaults Reported In Its App Last Year And Here’s What They Plan To Do

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Uber has been grappling sexism and sexual assault controversies for years now. After revealing its first safety report, the car service disclosed that users reported 3,045 sexual assaults, of those 235 were rapes, during rides last year. There were also nine murders and 58 people were killed in car accidents. 

The number of outright tragedies reported is less than one percent of total Uber rides, which reached 1.3 billion rides in the United States in 2018, according to the company. Nevertheless, officials at Uber were unsettled by the number of crimes and tragedies. 

Uber relies on the fact that it is accessible and ubiquitous to drivers and riders.

Like other ride-hailing apps, including Lyft and Via, the lynchpin of Uber’s business model is an egalitarian approach to who can use it. This means regulations are often ditched in favor of allowing any driver with a car to work for the company. It means these drivers aren’t screened, and in New York City they don’t require a Taxi medallion like traditional yellow cab drivers. 

When employees (and customers for that matter) aren’t properly audited, sexual assaults, attacks, and murders can become all too common. Uber maintains that the crimes and tragedies aren’t a reflection of Uber’s policies but of society’s. 

“The numbers are jarring and hard to digest,” Tony West, Uber’s chief legal officer told the New York Times. “What it says is that Uber is a reflection of the society it serves.”

When the New York Times checked Uber’s safety record against the New York Police Department’s registery of sex crimes and rapes on the city’s transit systems, 553 assaults were reported in 2018. 

There were trends among which crimes drivers committed and which were committed against them. 

While 92 percent of rape victims were riders, murder victims tended to be drivers, riders and other parties. However, both drivers and riders reported other forms of sexual assault at about the same rate, according to Uber’s report. The report categorizes sexual assault into 21 categories that range from unwanted touching to attempted rape to rape. 

“Confronting sexual violence requires honesty, and it’s only by shining a light on these issues that we can begin to provide clarity on something that touches every corner of society,” the company’s chief legal officer, Tony West, said in the executive summary of the report. “The moment is now for companies to confront it, count it, and work together to end it.”

In April a woman filed a $10 million lawsuit against Uber claiming she was sexually assaulted by her driver and as a result is suing the company for negligence and consumer protection violations, according to The Verge. At least 31 drivers have been convicted of various related offenses like assault, rape, false imprisonment and other crimes, according to CNN. Last year, a pedestrian was killed after being hit by a self-driving Uber car. In 2017, an engineer at the company exposed Uber’s corporate culture as sexist leading to an investigation where dozens of employees were fired. 

Uber has begun implementing more steps to protect passengers and drivers.

Uber’s reputation has been overshadowed by seemingly countless incidences of sexual assaults and the report has not pacified all of their critics. Nevertheless, many are praising the company for disclosing such information warts and all. 

“The more that the public is aware, the more the company and everyone else has to respond,” Jeanne Christensen, whose law firm represented rape victims in cases against Uber, told the New York Times. “It’s such a part of daily life that everyone is going to take it. We’re already at that point. So now they just have to make it as safe as possible.”

Uber has been taking steps over the past 21 months to document and prevent more safety violations. In the app, they added a panic button so that passengers can directly call 911 and provide them with their location. Riders can also use check-ins if their driver appears to be taking a suspicious route. 

“All of those steps are starters because these ride-hailing companies have been abjectly failing in their duty to protect against predators or criminals,” Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal told the New York Times

The company has partnered with the National Sexual Violence Resource Center to determine its best course of action. Since 2017, the company has tripled the staff of its safety team with continued expansion expected. In 2020, it will roll out a hotline with the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. 

“The numbers in the report are not surprising because sexual violence permeates all aspects of our society, whether that’s ride-share or Metro or taxi or a workplace,” Allison Randall of the National Network to End Domestic Violence told Washington Post. “This is definitely the start of a conversation.”