Entertainment

This Lesbian Relationship In A Televisa Telenovela Is Setting Off A Firestorm Of Love And Support All Over Social Media

If you watch telenovelas, then you know #Juliantina. If not, let us tell you about Mexican novela “Amar a Muerte,” which aired for four months on Televisa. Juliana and Valentina made the first same-sex couple on a Mexican telenovela and fans want more.

In fact, a petition has garnered over 60,000 signatures asking Televisa for a spinoff series. “It has opened the door for our LGTBQ community to be more visible and accepted,” the petition states about Juliantina. “Its impact in Mexico and Latin America is becoming stronger and stronger.”

While actresses Macarena Achaga and Bárbara López don’t identify as queer, the fandom loves them.

@Sapphire_1225 / Twitter

You’d be hard-pressed to find a fan who finds this problematic, likely because the story seemed authentic. One fan particularly loved that their romance wasn’t meant for male viewers–it was a slow building romance with all the twists and turns of that real lesbian life.

And are pining for more content.

@rian_and_bow / Twitter

One petition signer wrote that the spin-off is important because “We need more stories which identify we with. All our lives we have watched heterosexual novelas. At the same time it will help to make it more normal for parents.”

For lesbians, seeing a lesbian relationship that is mostly about these moments of intimacy is it.

@KadenaStudio / Twitter

We’re not here for hypersexualized lesbian relationships as side plots in shows. The fandom is here to see what Juliantina’s happily ever after looks like.

These bellas have made waves in Latin America.

@fandomburst / Twitter

Televisa gave Mexico a same-sex couple that is hard to hate–even for the haters. The actresses have even been on the cover of Cosmopolitan México.

Actually, they’ve made waves around the world.

Rose and Rosie / YouTube

This British YouTuber couple recorded a reaction video to some of the most iconic scenes from “Amar a Muerte” and that video alone has half a million views.

Of course, this romance could only blossom after the cartel kidnapped Juliana’s mother.

@misguidedpeople / Twitter

It is a telenovela. Still, fans want to see that moment where the two tell their grandchildren their love story. We want “The Notebook” meets Juliantina.

This fan toasted their treasured Ramadan ‘break the fast’ to #Juliantina.

@Tyaz_Reborn / Twitter

During a moment of delayed gratification, this fan was still thinking of Juliantina.

The petition has grown beyond just a spin-off.

@naecoool / Twitter

Jacqueline Marmolejo Contreras wrote on the Change.org petition that, “Que la visibilidad lésbica, así como la LGBT+ en general logre cambiar la heteronormatividad de la sociedad para que se vea el amor sin prejuicios, porque el amor es amor y a través de representaciones como Juliantina se ve y se puede lograr.”

Hundreds of #Juliantina fans are calling on ClexaCon to invite the couple.

@supacoolfool / Twitter

It’s the ultimate convention for all thing LGBTQ+ in Media and Entertainment, and Juliantina don’t have an invite.

Literally every Juliantina fan to Televisa and ClexaCon.

@Griselda856 / Twitter

Is this not a supply and demand market? Fans are yearning for content. Give the fans what they want.

In the meantime, Juliantina has a message for us.

@juliantinalls / Twitter

Or at least, Bárbara López does via Instagram: “Esto es para todas ustedes #juliantinas que sepan que las amo con todo mi corazón y las apoyo, pero sobre todo estoy agradecida con ustedes por darme tanto amor, por permitirme entrar en cada uno de sus corazones y hacerme parte de cada una de sus historias! #loveislove????Este mundo tiene que sentirse libre para amar. Este es un mensaje de agradecimiento y apoyo para cada un@ de ustedes. Gracias @amaramuerteoficial por permitirme darle vida a la Juliana y con ella hacerme más humana. #notgaybutsupportive”

Find “Amar a Muerte” streaming on Televisa.

READ: Univision Makes History, Announces First Telenovela That Will Star Gay Couple In Leading Role

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This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

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This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

via Getty Images

In the town of Ayahualtempa, Mexico, in the state of Guerrero, reporters see a shocking image whenever they visit. Children armed with guns, trained to defend themselves. The disturbing scene is meant to be shocking. The village of Ayahualtempa is under constant attack. A prominent heroin “corridor”, they are the victims of violence and carnage at the hands of gangsters and the cartel.

In order to gain the Mexican government’s attention, the Ayahualtempa villagers dress their children up as soldiers. Then, they invite the media in.

Ayahualtempa
via Getty Images

When reporters arrive, the children of Ayahualtempa dutifully line up and put on a performance. They march, they show how they would shoot a gun from one knee, or from flat on their bellies. They tell reporters that their mock-violent performance is “so the president sees us and helps us,” as a 12-year-old child named Valentín told the Associated Press.

Because the Mexican government doesn’t protect Ayahualtempa, the display of child soldiers is a form of protest for the small indigenous village. The people of this remote region of Guerrero want protection from the National Guard, and financial help for widows and orphans who have been made so from organized crime.

The villagers don’t trust local authorities, and for good reason. Guerrera is the Mexican state in which 43 teaching students were abducted and killed in an event that is known as the “Iguala mass kidnapping”. Authorities arrested 80 suspects in connection to the event. 44 of them were police officers, working in conjunction with a network of cartels.

Although the demonstrations function largely as a publicity stunt, violence is very much a part of these children’s lives.

via Getty Images

Parents train their children to walk to school with loaded guns, ready to defend themselves against violent gangsters.

The attention-grabbing antics have, to some extent, worked. On one occasion, the government donated some housing material. On another, benefactors gave the community’s orphans and widows scholarships and houses. But as soon as the periodic media storms die down, the federal government continues pretending Ayahualtempa doesn’t exist.

The hypocrisy of the government’s response is frustrating to many. “We’ve normalized that these children don’t eat, are illiterate, are farm workers. We’re used to the Indians dying young, but, ‘How dare they arm them!’” said local human rights activist Abel Barrera to the AP, with a heavy dose of sarcasm.

As for now, until the government moves to protect the community, they say they will continue their demonstrations. “They see that the issue of the children is effective for making people take notice and they think: If that’s what works, we’ll have to keep doing it,” said Barrera.

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Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Entertainment

Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Pokémon fans in Latin America are mourning the death of Diana Pérez, the Spanish-language voice of Jessie of Pokémon’s Team Rocket. The voice actress has been voicing the character since 1997.

Diana Pérez, the voice actress of Team Rocket’s Jessie, died at 51.

Lalo Garza, a famed voice actor in Mexico, confirmed the death of the Pokémon voice actress.

“Rest in peace Diana Pérez, a strong, cultured, intelligent, and very talented woman. You are good now, friend. Nothing hurts anymore. Have a good trip,” reads the tweet.

Pérez has been a staple in the Spanish-language Pokémon fandom for decades.

Pérez was more than just he voice of Jessie. The voice actress was the voice of multiple anime characters including Luffy in One Piece and Kagura in Inuyasha. In recent years, Pérez had started branching out to directing, producing, and other branches in the entertainment industry.

Pérez’s death is being mourned by Pokémon fans outside of the Spanish-language fandom.

Sarah Natochenny is the English voice of Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon series, Jessie’s mortal enemy. The death of Pérez has impacted the larger Pokémon community. Pérez was a pivotal part of the Latin American Pokémon community for decades and her loss has devastated fans.

Descansa en paz, Diana.

There have been no plans announced for a replacement to voice Team Rocket’s Jessie. No official cause of death has been released either. Our hearts and thoughts go out to Pérez’s family and the greater Pokémon community mourning her passing.

READ: I Was Today Years Old When I Found Out This Mexican Pokémon

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