Entertainment

Juan Gabriel’s Son Is Suing Univision And Telemundo For $100 Million

In Florida this morning, the son and daughter-in-law of the late Juan Gabriel filed a lawsuit against Univision and Telemundo for $100 million. Ivan Aguilera and his wife Simona allege that both Spanish-language networks broadcasted “fictitious, defamatory stories” about them, which included multiple stories on Joao Aguilera, who claimed to be the son of Juan Gabriel.

Ivan states that these networks profited off the legacy of his late father by exploiting lies and damaging their reputation, Fortune reports.

The lawsuit states that “Joao was not part of Juan Gabriel’s family unit during Gabriel’s life, did not participate in any family functions during Gabriel’s life, and waited more than 25 years, until Gabriel passed away, to say anything about his supposed relationship to Gabriel. Joao has come forward in the press and the courts to make a dubious posthumous claim that Gabriel was his biological father.”

Several programs produced by Univision, including “Primer Impacto,” are listed in the lawsuit.


One of the allegations by Joao that is listed in the lawsuit states that Ivan, cremated his father – against his wishes, “because they wanted to get rid of the body to avoid DNA testing.” Ivan claims that “In reality, Gabriel instructed in writing that his body be cremated.”

“Univision published a series of sensationalistic stories, covering Joao’s claims as if it were a soap opera or Spanish ‘telenovela,’ and broadcasting them for their value in generating ratings and clicks, and titillating Univision’s viewers and readers, despite the incredible and knowingly false nature of the claims. Any responsible journalist would carefully check allegations, such as that the Plaintiffs are thieves, or that they had no relationship with Gabriel, before publishing them,” the lawsuit states.

To read the court document filed by Ivan Aguilera click here.


[H/T] Juan Gabriel’s Son Files $100M Defamation Suit Against Univision And Telemundo

READ: People On Twitter Can’t Handle Juan Gabriel’s Death…And We Totally Relate

Do you think Ivan is right for suing Telemundo and Univision? Share this story and let us know by commenting below!

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This Is Why Alberto Aguilera Valadez Took The Stage Name Juan Gabriel

Entertainment

This Is Why Alberto Aguilera Valadez Took The Stage Name Juan Gabriel

Juan Gabriel is without a doubt one of the most iconic and influential entertainers out of Mexico ever. His songs have been covered by some of the most popular musicians in the world, including Roberto Jordan, Rocío Dúrcal, José José, among many others. However, before reaching fame as JuanGa, he was known only by his original name, Alberto Aguilera Valadez.

So why after breaking into the music industry using his original name did he decide to change it? 

JuanGa wasn’t always known as Juan Gabriel, here’s why he made the change.

Like so many of the world’s most famous artists, Juan Gabriel – or Alberto Aguilera Valadez – didn’t have the easiest upbringing. In fact, he faced many problems during his childhood as the youngest of his brothers. He didn’t get to spend much time with his mother since he was enrolled in boarding school so that she could focus on work. And Alberto lost his father at a very young age, so he never actually had the opportunity to even meet him. 

In an interview on The Story Behind The Myth, Juan Gabriel explained why he had been named Alberto: “They named me Alberto because at that time the telenovela called El Derecho de Nacer was in fashion, and the main character was Alberto Limonta.” However, when he grew up and lived at the Escuela de Mejoramiento boarding school in Ciudad Juárez when he was a child, he met Juan Contreras, a piano and guitar teacher who taught him music.

“He told me that I had an ear for music and that he was going to teach me,” recalled Divo de Juárez in an interview. Juanito, as the singer called him, became his greatest confidante. “The times I was with Juanito, he would talk to me and listen to me and I would cry because my mother was not going to come see me or because I was locked up.”

And Juan Gabriel wasn’t the singer’s first stage name.

Upon finishing boarding school, Alberto started looking for a career in music. In 1965, he appeared on the nightly talk show, Noches Rancheras in Ciudad Juárez and the show’s host began to call him Adán Luna, which would be the singer’s first stage name. 

However, over the years and with the opportunity to record his first album, Alberto Aguilera Valadez decided to change the name of Adán Luna to Juan Gabriel. The origin of this name is derived from two of the most important men in his life and whom he was most fond of.

The first, Juan, is in honor of the teacher that the Divo de Juárez met in the boarding school where he lived when he was a child, while Gabriel was his father’s first name.

Throughout his successful career, Alberto Aguilera Valadez managed to establish himself as one of the best artists in Mexico, despite the fact that he died almost 5 years ago, his legacy continues.

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Mijente Is Petitioning For Univision And Telemundo To Change Their Bias Approach To The BLM Protests

Things That Matter

Mijente Is Petitioning For Univision And Telemundo To Change Their Bias Approach To The BLM Protests

Update: The Black Lives Matter protests aren’t going anywhere. Cities and states are listening and bowing to pressure from protesters demanding a radical change to policing. Yet, while the rest of the country watches the peaceful protests, Univisión and Telemundo are being called out for perpetuating racial bias in their coverage. Mijente is demanding some change.

Mijente is calling on Univisión and Telemundo to do better with their BLM coverage.

The Latino community is plagued with anti-Black racism and sentiment. We all heard it while we were growing up from our parents and grandparents. It was in the form of microaggressions of the “mejorar la raza” variety. Well, now it is 2020 and it is time to hold our community accountable for their words against the Black community. Some are taking their fight to Univisión and Telemundo accusing them of perpetuating the same anti-Black racism in their coverage of the BLM protests.

“These two networks are the main source of information for millions of Latino households,” reads the petition demanding that Telemundo and Univisión do better in their reporting. “By producing news programming and content that focuses on negative depictions of protesters, that fails to cover the systematic causes of anti-Black police violence, and that makes no effort at centering the voices of Black people in their coverage the networks have contributed to the Latino community’s skewed and incomplete understanding of the current crisis. Their coverage feeds into anti-Black stereotypes that have historically existed in the Latino community, which in the extreme can and have been used as justification for anti-Black violence and which serves to further divide us.”

If you want to sign the petition, you can click here.

Original: In the wake of videos showing the arrest and death of George Floyd, protests have erupted across the country.

The video capturing Floyd’s death shows the 46-year-old African-American struggling to breathe under the harsh restrained of a police officer who used his knee to keep Floyd pinned to the ground by his neck. As Floyd struggled, bystanders pled with the arresting police officers to allow him to breathe.

Along with the protests and various outcries from political figures and celebrities across the country, media outlets have been thorough in their reports of the protests. Coverage has ranged from reports directly at the scene of protests as well as interviews with protestors and Black Lives Matter advocates and allies. Over the weekend, many outlets have also focused on the ways in which the protests have taken shape across the country with a small percentage of participants looting stores and being forced to battle against police who have resorted to using tear gas and violence to combat rioters.

Unfortunately, outlets like Telemundo and Univision have chosen to cover the events taking place by sensationalizing the violence taking place.

The two outlets, known for their coverage of Latino-related news, also have a common history of juggling racial issues along with biases within its newsrooms. It turns out, in a time when their Black audiences need them most, the two media outlets have failed once again. Over the weekend, users on Twitter were quick to call out both Telemundo and Univision for their fear-inducing coverage of the protests that have taken place over the weekend.

Speaking about the biased coverage one users’ post to Twitter sparked thousands of comments and retweets.

“I find it interesting that hispanic media like Univision & Telemundo are so selective on whats broadcasted in regards to the protests and riots going on knowing thats where the majority of our latin/hispanic parents depend on 4 info,” a user by the name of @valeriabty_wrote. “Turn that shit off n teach ur parents instead!”

Others were quick to point out the coverage is pretty par for the course when it comes to the Latinidad.

“I am a black Puerto Rican and I could not agree more, we Afro Latinos have little to no visibility within the Latino community. Colorism is alive and kicking in the community,” another user wrote.

Here’s hoping Telemundo and Univision find a way to change their approach to coverage and support the Black community.

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