Entertainment

Classic Christmas Song ‘Baby It’s Cold Outside’ Gets PC Makeover For 21st Century

We are in a new era in which women are demanding equal pay and saying enough is enough when it comes to sexual abuse. It’s a new stance that stems from the “Me Too” Movement and the “Women’s March” that shows women do not have to take it anymore. If you are woke you cannot be inappropriate. If you’re a fan of the cancel culture, then it’s time to shut out things from the past than don’t get a free pass any longer, including some of your most favorite things.

In light of the “Me Too” movement and canceling men who are too aggressive, John Legend and Kelly Clarkson have released a new version of “Baby It’s Cold Outside” that puts men and women on equal footing.

Credit: johnlegend / Instagram

The old classic Christmas song is part of Legend’s new Christmas special on Dec. 1 called “Christmas Under The Stars” that will air on BYUtv. Legend said it was time to change the original version because that song wasn’t acceptable anymore. Legend wrote the song with actress Natasha Rothwell from “Insecure.”

Before we discuss the new version, here’s the original version, which was written in 1944. 

Credit/ YouTube

The song, written by Frank Loesser, became a hit after it was featured in the 1949 movie “Neptune’s Daughter.” It was performed by Esther Williams and Ricardo Montalbán. It also went on to win an Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 22nd Academy Awards. The scene shows actress Williams attempting to leave and Montalbán’s character is trying to persuade her to stay. 

Here’s a portion of the problematic lyrics:

The neighbors might think, (baby, it’s bad out there)/ Say, what’s in this drink? (No cabs to be had out there)/ I wish I knew how, your eyes are like starlight now (To break this spell), I’ll take your hat, (your hair looks swell)/ I ought to say no, no, no, (mind if I move in closer?)/ At least I’m gonna say that I tried, (what’s the sense in hurting my pride?)/ I really can’t stay, (baby don’t hold out)/ Ah, but it’s cold outside.

Interestingly enough, this song wasn’t supposed to be in the film at all. The movie would have featured another Loesser song called “(I’d Like to Get You on a) Slow Boat to China.” However, the song was replaced because the studio felt it was inappropriate. They instead included “Baby It’s Cold Outside.” So, even back then they understood what would be seen as offensive. However, they had no issue with singing about a woman that is forced to stay with a man.

Here is the new politically correct/ anti-rape version of the song. 

Credit/ YouTube

Here are some of the lyrics. 

“I really can’t stay (Baby, it’s cold outside)/ I’ve got to go away (But, I can call you a ride)/ This evening has been (I’m so glad that you dropped in)/ So very nice (Time spent with you is paradise)/ My mom will start to worry (I’ll call the car and tell him to hurry)/ My daddy will be pacing the floor (Wait, what are you still livin’ at home for?)/ So, really, I’d better scurry (Your driver, his name is Murray)/ But maybe just a half a drink more (Oh, we’re both adults, so who’s keepin’ score?)/

AND

I ought to say, “No, no, no, sir” (Then you really ought to go, go, go)/ At least I’m gonna say that I tried (Well, Murray, he just pulled up outside)/

AND

I simply should go (Text me when you get home)/ Oh I’m supposed to say no (Mm, I guess that’s respectable)/ This welcome has been (I’ve been lucky that you dropped in)/ So nice and warm (But you better go before it storms).

You get the point. 

The obvious difference between the original and the new version is that the male isn’t insisting that she stays. If she wants to leave, he is helping her do just that, and not forcing her to stay. 

Credit: @johnlegend / Twitter

Legend tweeted, “New version of #BabyItsColdOutside! A welcome update or ‘PC Culture run amok & destroying everything great in the history of music?’ (🙄). You decide.”

So what does the world think about this new version for the Me Too era?

Credit: Twitter

It’s actually a mixed bag. Some people like it, some don’t.

At least one person has an issue with the new song because of this lyric…

Credit: @crybabykiani / Twitter

So, we guess Legend is now shaming people who still live at home? Wow.

But if you’re seriously not into the new version, it’s okay, you can still listen to the old one.

Credit: @crissyteigen / Twitter

Then again, it looks like Legend and Clarkson got rid of the old song for good.

READ: John Legend’s New Music Video Centered Around Immigration and Deportation Will Leave A Lump In Your Throat

Our Tías’ Nacimientos Will Never Be The Same Since Mexico Has Outlawed Buying And Selling The Moss

Culture

Our Tías’ Nacimientos Will Never Be The Same Since Mexico Has Outlawed Buying And Selling The Moss

sony_a6000photos / Instagram / Pinterest

Growing up Mexican I looked forward to the Christmas season yes, tbh mostly because of presents but also because it was the time when mom and I got to go way overboard with our Nativity Scene decorations. If you’re Latino, putting up a nacimiento is just as essential a part of Christmas, as putting up a tree. If there’s one cliche that has proven to be true, time and again, it’s that Latino moms tend to be extra AF in everything they do. The representations of Jesus’s birth vary from minimal, to OTT baroque, to hyper-realistic. There’s one element that remains the most important aspect of the nacimiento across the board, in Mexico at least, the moss and other dense green clumps are usually used to adorn the decoration. So, what if we told you that buying and selling moss is actually illegal in Mexico?

Nacimiento, Pesebre, or Belen, are the names that different Latin American countries give to the traditional Nativity Scene representation under the Christmas tree.

Credit: Pinterest

The representation of Jesus’s birth, known as nacimiento in Mexico, pesebre in Colombia and other South American countries, or Belen in Spain, is a centuries-old tradition in the Catholic world. All you really need to tell the story are three basic figures: Virgin Mary, Joseph, and baby Jesus. But why limit yourself? 

You could make the case that the three wise men and the star that guided them to the newborn baby are also essential. Jesus was born in a stable because there was no place at the inns in Bethlehem, so naturally, there should be farm animals around, and hay, and moss —and why not a stream made of cellophane, while you’re at it? 

Nativity Scenes are usually elaborate, over the top extravaganzas that families work tirelessly on for the holiday season.

In Mexico and many other countries of Latin America, nacimientos can turn into elaborate extravaganzas, populated by all manner of animals and plants that you would never find side by side in the real world. Some scenes display pump-operated rivers with real water, others feature waterfalls and ponds. Some include whole cities built around the manger where Jesus was born. The creative license extends to the characters, which range from unrelated biblical figures such as Adam and Eve to random shepherds, farmers, and the devil. It’s clearly not an exercise in authenticity, but it’s festive and fun.

Part of the fun is the use of moss and other types of grass to add to the ‘look’. 

Credit: Pinterest

Moss is used to decorate the scene, but it also has a special symbolism. Spanish moss is of particular importance in the catholic representation of baby Jesus’s birth. A little patch of the gray grass is always placed underneath Satan —to highlight his presence and set him apart from the rest of the crowd. According to tradition, Satan should always be present in a nacimiento to remind us that although the birth of Jesus offers love and the possibility of redemption, sin and evil are always present in the world —and moss plays a big part in his representation.

As soon as November starts drawing to an end and December is around the corner, every mercado in Mexico is flooded by vendors who sell the coveted greenery of the season. 

Credit: @jjoel777 / Twitter

Every city and town has a market where, for about a month between the end of November and the first week in January, a large number of vendors offer items, especially for Christmas.  Some larger cities, like Mexico City, Guadalajara, Morelia, and others, offer several tianguis navideños (Christmas markets) where literally hundreds of vendors set up shop, to sell the infamous moss. 

But as it turns out, selling and/or buying moss is illegal.

Credit: losconfites_organicfarm / Instagram

This type of grass is essential for the survival of Mexican forests. The species is protected by the country, which makes its trade ilegal —and you might want to think twice before you buy it. 

Mosses are actually essential for the health and wellbeing of many ecosystems and all the organisms that inhabit them.

Credit: sony_a6000photos / Instagram

The term moss encompasses any of at least 12,000 species of small land plants. Mosses are distributed throughout the world except in saltwater and are commonly found in moist shady locations. They are best known as those species that carpet woodland and forest floors. Ecologically, mosses capture water and filter it to underground streams, or substrata, releasing nutrients for the use of more complex plants that succeed them. They also aid in soil erosion control by providing surface cover and absorbing water, and they are important in the nutrient and water economy of some vegetation types. Essentially, they are the pulse of forests and ecosystems everywhere.

Protection and conservation are relatively novel concepts in Mexican bryology, the branch of botany that studies mosses. 

Credit: @elbigdatamx / Twitter

Mexico is home to more than 900 recorded species of moss —and much of the country’s territory is yet to be explored thoroughly for more flora. However, local mosses face habitat destruction and over-harvesting as their major threat. 

In 1993, a diagnostic study of mosses that required protection Mexico was conducted, and supported by the federal government as well as other international agencies. At the time, six species were recognized as ‘rare’ or ‘endangered’ and were placed under official protection. 

The Secretariat of Environmental and Natural Resources of Mexico regulates the extraction and trade of moss. 

Credit: @iinfodeac / Twitter

In order to extract moss from its natural habitat, and furthermore, to commercialize it, vendors must follow strict requirements in order to attain a license. According to Mexican Forest Law 001 expedited by SEMARNAT (The Secretariat of Environmental and Natural Resources of Mexico), the extraction of moss is only permitted when the plant is in a mature state and ready for harvest, other conditions require that moss must be extracted in parcels of no more than 2 meters of width and that only 50 percent of each patch of moss may be extracted, etc. 

During this time of year, Mexican police are on high alert. 

Credit: @mimorelia / Twitter

Around the holiday season, police in Mexico double up on their patrolling. Authorities will be on high alert, inspecting those establishments who are authorized to sell moss and searching for those who aren’t. The Secretariat of Environmental and Natural Resources and the Federal Attorney for Environmental Protection will be watching —so you might want to tell your mom and tias to avoid shopping for moss in Mexico this year.

READ: Check Out Some Of The Most Tiny And Adorable Nacimientos

After A Nearly 3 Decade-Long Career, Shakira Is Giving Us A Well Deserved Documentary And We’re LIVING

Entertainment

After A Nearly 3 Decade-Long Career, Shakira Is Giving Us A Well Deserved Documentary And We’re LIVING

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Shakira first gained fame in her native Colombia in the mid 1990s. And as a young millennial who grew up to her music, it’s hard to believe that the singer’s been such an iconic presence in Latinx music for almost three decades now. Shakira has built a name for herself as an entertainment powerhouse, this Latina has changed pop culture and reigns supreme as the hip-shaking queen. This year, she’s back from a vocal injury with a whole documentary —which will be premiering in theaters this month. 

In November 2017, Shakira suffered a vocal cord hemorrhage.

After a vocal injury which forced the singer to postpone her first tour in seven years — and her first since becoming a mother to two sons— Shak is ready to bounce back with a documentary that brushes on her vocal-cord hemorrhage injury, but mainly follows her in her 2017 tour ‘El Dorado’.

El Dorado, in 2017, marked her first U.S. trek in seven years. The run, however, was delayed for several months until Shakira recovered from her injury. 

We’ll get to see the Colombiana perform all of her classics. 

The 30-second trailer for the documentary, opens with shots that capture Shakira’s difficult recovery. But the rest of the trailer is packed with shots teasing the singer’s iconic return as she dances across the stage, plays guitar, beats the drums and sings to her classics “Hips Don’t Lie” and “Whenever, Wherever.”

Shakira took control of 100% of what went down during her ‘El Dorado’ tour.

instagram @shakira

Much like Beyonce did in her Homecoming show and ‘documentary’, this Latina diva took absolute control of every aspect of her live show: from the lighting to the musical arrangements to the choreography. “I want to look sexy as hell, or I cancel this!” yells Shakira with zeal to her crew during rehearsal in a scene of the film —and we can relate on a deep spiritual level.

In contrast to Beyonce though, and other superstars of her level, on this tour Shakira had no backup dancers, “I wanted the freedom to improvise,” she says to the camera during the film. The set design was purposefully minimalistic —inspired, she says, by Anton Corbijn, one of her favorite visual artists, who has directed music videos for U2, Metallica, and Depeche Mode.

The documentary was co-directed by the singer and will feature a lot of clips from her 2018 show in LA.

Shakira co-directed Shakira in Concert with James Merryman, and much of the movie was filmed at the pop star’s August 2018 concert in Los Angeles. The film will also feature behind-the-scenes clips and narration from Shakira.

Latinx music fans will also get to see other singers who have collaborated with Shakira.

instagram @nickyjampr

Fans of reggaeton are in for a treat! The documentary also features a few behind-the-scenes moments of Shakira in the studio with Maluma and Nicky Jam, writing and recording their songs ‘Perro Fiel’ and ‘Chantaje’ together. We’ll get to catch glimpses of her interacting with her family —aka her hottie of a husband, Gerrard Pique— and her band during rehearsals and between concerts. Viewers will even get to see her dancing and singing aboard her private plane, still brimming with adrenaline after performing the nightly two-hour-long show.

El Dorado won’t be available on streaming platforms just yet —the singer has something much bigger planned.

Instagram @shakira

Unlike other pop-star documentaries, El Dorado won’t be immediately available on streaming services or DVD. Shakira wanted her fans to have a communal fan experience by screening it in theaters. Shakira in Concert: El Dorado World Tour will be shown in more than 2,000 theaters in more than 60 countries on the same day. Alongside the film, there will be a live album of the tour coming out this week as well. 

Shakira dedicated ‘El Dorado’ to her fans.

instagram @shakira

The entire project, the film and album, is a gift to fans who have been with her through thick and thin and who, Shakira says, are the true protagonists of El Dorado. “When an artist decides to go on tour, in a way, he or she needs reaffirmation,”  she said. “We need to confirm that there’s people out there loving us, worshipping what you do. . . . [There’s] a very narcissistic motivation behind all of that.”  “When I came out on tour this time, there was none of that. I just wanted to do it for them, because they were there for me.”

Tickets for Shakira in concert are available on the film’s website. Shakira in Concert: El Dorado World Tour will premiere internationally on November 13th