Entertainment

With One Major Benefit Concert, J.Lo And Marc Anthony Raised Millions For Disaster Relief

Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony brought together some of the biggest names in entertainment for Somos Live!, a night of fundraising that resulted in $35 million for disaster relief. Selena Gomez was part of the team that held down the phones. Bruno Mars performed a song in Spanish. Jennifer Lopez was all over the place, making sure everything ran smoothly. Somos Live! was aired simultaneously by both Telemundo and Univision, a first in Spanish-language television history. The concert was also aired on MTV, VH1, BET, and other networks. Here’s a quick recap of the performances that went down at Somos Live!

Seventy singers, actors and other celebrities came together to raise as much money as possible for disaster relief.

The money will go to those affected by recent earthquakes in Mexico as well as those affected by hurricanes in Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida, Mexico, and other Caribbean islands.

Ricky Martin expressed his Puerto Rican pride while performing “Pégate.”

Ricky Martin has been very active since Hurricane Maria and has raised $3 million via crowdfunding efforts, according to People.

“I don’t sleep,” Martin told People. “I’m in creative mode, trying to see how we can bring love and hope to my people in Puerto Rico.”

Demi Lovato sang a rendition of “Hallelujah” that will take you to church.

Lovato, who claims Dallas, Texas as her hometown, was quick to respond after Hurricane Harvey hit her home state. The singer and actor not only went to Houston to volunteer, she donated 50,000 bottles of water. Lovato also set up a fundraising initiative to help the Houston Food Bank and kicked things off by donating $50,000 of her own money.

Bruno Mars gave “Just The Way You Are” a bilingual remix no one was expecting.

Mars is not shy about expressing his love for his Puerto Rican heritage. During Somos Live!, Mars mentioned that although he grew up in Hawaii, he feels connected to Puerto Rico through blood.

Earlier this year, in an interview with Latina Magazine, Mars tackled the rumors that he changed his name for the stage because it was “too Latino.”

“I never once said I changed my last name to hide the fact that I’m Puerto Rican,” Mars told Latina Magazine. “Why would I f**king say that? Who are you fooling? And why would anyone say that? That’s so insulting to me, to my family. That’s ridiculous. My last name is Hernandez. My father’s name is Pedrito Hernandez, and he’s a Puerto Rican pimp. There’s no denying that.”

Jennifer Lopez set the stage on fire, as only she can, by performing one of her earlier hits.

@JLo is pure fire on stage ? (Full Video : Link In Bio) ??#JLo #JenniferLopez #SomosLive

A post shared by John JLover (@johnjlover) on

This “Let’s Get Loud” performance was ???.

She also performed her more recent hit “Ni Tu Ni Yo.”

J.Lo has been a major player in getting disaster relief to Puerto Rico since Hurricane Maria. The singer was open about not being able to communicate with her family in Puerto Rico after the hurricane and stepped up to donate $1 million to help the island recover. J.Lo also joined a star-studded cast to sing on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Almost Like Praying” to raise even more money for Puerto Rico.

Romeo Santos showed up to give his fans a little something.

Santos and Marc Anthony reconnected on the stage to perform their duet “Yo Tambien.” Santos has played a major role in getting supplies to Puerto Rico with the help of the hip-hop community in New York City. According to Fox5NY, he led a donation drive and collected enough supplies to fill up four planes, paid for by Jay Z and TIDAL. The international superstar was able to send 200,000 pounds of relief supplies to Puerto Rico to help with recovery efforts.

Anthony closed out the event with one final call to action for all Latinos to help Puerto Rico.

After singing “Preciosa,” a song that has always been dedicated to Puerto Rico, Anthony called on the crowd to keep fighting for Latinos.

“Thanks a lot everyone. May God bless you. It could be you tomorrow,” Anthony told the crowd at the end of the show. “It could be you tomorrow and you know what, we’ll be there. May God bless you. Long live the Latino race, dammit!”


READ: As People Still Suffer After Hurricanes And Earthquakes, Marc Anthony Is Putting Together A Massive Relief Benefit Concert

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Puerto Rican Boxer Félix Verdejo Sánchez Pleads Not Guilty To Charges Of Killing Of Pregnant Woman

Things That Matter

Puerto Rican Boxer Félix Verdejo Sánchez Pleads Not Guilty To Charges Of Killing Of Pregnant Woman

Puerto Rican boxer Félix Verdejo Sánchez is charged with murdering Keishla Rodríguez Ortiz, who was pregnant at the time. In a virtual court hearing earlier this week, Verdejo Sánchez pleaded not guilty to federal charges related to the murder.

Boxer Félix Verdejo Sánchez is being charged with murder in connection to the death of Keishla Rodríguez Ortiz.

Earlier this month, news broke that Rodríguez Ortiz’s body was found floating in a lagoon. The news shocked Puerto Rico because Rodríguez Ortiz was pregnant when she was killed. Verdejo Sánchez, who is married and has a young daughter, was quickly arrested and charged with murder in connection with her death.

According to an FBI complaint, Verdejo Sánchez is accused of punching Rodríguez Ortiz in the face before injecting her with an unknown substance. She was then tied up and heavy blocks were attached to the bindings before being thrown from a bridge. Verdejo Sánchez then allegedly shot at Rodríguez Ortiz’s body before fleeing the scene.

Verdejo Sánchez and Luis Antonio Cádiz Martínez were both indicted in the crime.

According to reports, Cadíz Martinez helped Verdejo Sánchez commit the crime and has worked as a witness for the FBI as they investigate the murder. Both men have pleaded not guilty to one count of carjacking resulting in death, one count of kidnapping resulting in death, and one count of killing an unborn child. Verdejo Sánchez is also facing one count of carrying a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence.

The two men are facing federal charges that could come with federal death penalties.

The death penalty is illegal in Puerto Rico but special circumstances in the case could mean federal death penalties. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Puerto Rico said in a statement that the crime was done “by payment or the promise of payment.” That is enough to escalate the matter to a federal crime.

“Keishla Rodríguez-Ortiz was taken from a family that loved her, and she and her child were denied the most fundamental right of life, and the joy of knowing what that life could have been,” United States Attorney W. Stephen Muldrow said in a statement. “We hope that this process brings some measure of solace to Keishla’s family. This case also underscores the message of cooperation with law enforcement that I have been repeating to the community – If you have knowledge of criminal activity, even if you are a participant in that activity, do the right thing and come forward to authorities. The prosecutors and the law enforcement agencies that have worked tirelessly, and who continue to assist in the ongoing investigation of this case, are to be commended.”

Rodríguez Ortiz’s death has sparked outrage as the island confronts a spike in femicide since January.

Twenty-one women have been killed in Puerto Rico since the beginning of the year. According to Observatorio de Equidad de Género, 60 women were killed last year in Puerto Rico, which is a 62 percent increase from 2019. Puerto Ricans are demanding justice and answers as the same femicide gripping the rest of Latin America is on the rise.

This story is ongoing and mitú will update on the story as it develops.

READ: Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

Things That Matter

This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

via Getty Images

In the town of Ayahualtempa, Mexico, in the state of Guerrero, reporters see a shocking image whenever they visit. Children armed with guns, trained to defend themselves. The disturbing scene is meant to be shocking. The village of Ayahualtempa is under constant attack. A prominent heroin “corridor”, they are the victims of violence and carnage at the hands of gangsters and the cartel.

In order to gain the Mexican government’s attention, the Ayahualtempa villagers dress their children up as soldiers. Then, they invite the media in.

Ayahualtempa
via Getty Images

When reporters arrive, the children of Ayahualtempa dutifully line up and put on a performance. They march, they show how they would shoot a gun from one knee, or from flat on their bellies. They tell reporters that their mock-violent performance is “so the president sees us and helps us,” as a 12-year-old child named Valentín told the Associated Press.

Because the Mexican government doesn’t protect Ayahualtempa, the display of child soldiers is a form of protest for the small indigenous village. The people of this remote region of Guerrero want protection from the National Guard, and financial help for widows and orphans who have been made so from organized crime.

The villagers don’t trust local authorities, and for good reason. Guerrera is the Mexican state in which 43 teaching students were abducted and killed in an event that is known as the “Iguala mass kidnapping”. Authorities arrested 80 suspects in connection to the event. 44 of them were police officers, working in conjunction with a network of cartels.

Although the demonstrations function largely as a publicity stunt, violence is very much a part of these children’s lives.

via Getty Images

Parents train their children to walk to school with loaded guns, ready to defend themselves against violent gangsters.

The attention-grabbing antics have, to some extent, worked. On one occasion, the government donated some housing material. On another, benefactors gave the community’s orphans and widows scholarships and houses. But as soon as the periodic media storms die down, the federal government continues pretending Ayahualtempa doesn’t exist.

The hypocrisy of the government’s response is frustrating to many. “We’ve normalized that these children don’t eat, are illiterate, are farm workers. We’re used to the Indians dying young, but, ‘How dare they arm them!’” said local human rights activist Abel Barrera to the AP, with a heavy dose of sarcasm.

As for now, until the government moves to protect the community, they say they will continue their demonstrations. “They see that the issue of the children is effective for making people take notice and they think: If that’s what works, we’ll have to keep doing it,” said Barrera.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com