Entertainment

J Balvin Wants To Help Soothe Your Mental Health With Free, Bilingual Meditations

This may just be the biggest understatement ever, but 2020 has been one hell of a year – and it’s just now barely half way over. Apart from some of the incredible music artists have dropped this year, it’s been one crisis after another.

With everything going on and the increased isolation and loneliness, you’re likely feeling a combination of apprehensive, frazzled, angry, and confused.

Thankfully, there are plenty of very simple ways out there to find some balance and calm those nerves. The beloved J Balvin, along with famed alternative medicine advocate Deepak Chopra, has launched a new program that’s aimed at just that: helping us find balance and wisdom in these uncertain times.

J Balvin joins forces with Deepak Chopra to launch a free, bilingual 21-day meditation program.

Meditating can be an intimidating practice to start on your own, especially if its acceptance in your community isn’t widespread. Which let’s face it – it’s not exactly common in the Latino community.

Enter J Balvin and Deepak Chopra who have launched a 21-day meditation series.

J Balvin says that meditation saved his life and the hope is that the daily practice will change the lives of all who participate, too. 

“The world is offering us a reset and J Balvin is the perfect partner to help us reach a critical mass of expanded global awareness,” said Deepak Chopra of the partnership in a company press release. “Together we will set the stage for a more peaceful, inclusive, just, sustainable, healthy and joyful world for all. I am indebted to Jose and our Spanish speaking community for this collaboration.”

In an essay for People, J Balvin opened up about his struggled with mental health and how meditation has helped him.

Credit: JBalvin/ Instagram

J Balvin penned an essay for People, in which he opens up about his own struggles with mental health. He shares how he’s experienced both anxiety and depression, and that meditation has been one of the tools he’s used to help manage his mental health. If you’re looking for ways to help improve your mental health and build out a self-care routine, we recommend meditating.

On mental health, Balvin adds: “What makes mental health universal is that it does not discriminate. Mental health doesn’t care about your age, your race, your background; none of those things. It doesn’t care what you look like, or who you’re dating, or how much money you have in the bank. Of course it’s different for each of us. But it affects all of us.”

And speaking more about mental health awareness in the Latino community, Balvin says: “…because I am Latino — I know there can be a certain stigma in my community when it comes to mental well-being. Many Latino men will not want to talk about depression, because they fear it is not a manly thing, or that they will then be known as loco. But I don’t hesitate to say that I have been depressed.”

These are strong words and are so important for many of us to hear, to know that we’re not alone.

Deepak Chopra is a famed author and alternative medicine advocate.

Chopra is a popular author and alternative medicine guru in the English-world. He’s written several books about consciousness and meditation and he had a partnership with Oprah for her 21-Day Meditation series.

Deepak Chopra says that he’s excited to reach a new audience and to be able to work alongside J Balvin, a man who has been very open with his own struggles.

The 21-Day program is free and available in both English and Spanish.

Credit: deepakchopra/ Instagram

The program, Renew Yourself: Body, Mind & Spirit is a 360 look at rejuvenation and will be available through Chopra’s website. With a strong track record of success, the 21-Day Meditation program encourages participants to move beyond old, limiting beliefs and patterns for 20 minutes each day, opening with guided wisdom and storytelling from Balvin, followed by a meditation session with Chopra. Renew Yourself: Body, Mind & Spirit is free for longer than 21 days, typically 5-6 weeks, and at the end, listeners can purchase the meditation to have on-going access to both Chopra and J Balvin.

In addition to the daily meditations, you’ll also recieve a daily message and journaling prompts to complete each day. “Together we will set the stage for a more peaceful, inclusive, just, sustainable, healthy, and joyful world for all,” Chopra said in the press release.

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Michelle Obama Says That She Has ‘Low-Grade Depression’

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Michelle Obama Says That She Has ‘Low-Grade Depression’

Scott Olson / Getty

Since leaving her life in the White House, former first lady Michelle Obama has been unabashedly open about her personal life. From writing about her marriage in her recent book Becoming to speaking out about our current president, Obama is unleashing her truth in so many ways. Recently, she revealed during an episode of her podcast that, like most of us, she’s been dealing with “some form of low-grade depression” thanks in part to recent events.

During last week’s Wednesday episode of her eponymous podcast, Obama talked with journalist Michele Norris about her mental health saying “Barack and I, we’ve lived outside of the norm of regular life for quite some time, and what we learned early on in the White House is — in order to stay sane and feel like the human that you once were — is that you have to have a schedule and a routine.”

Speaking out about her current mental state Obama revealed that she has struggled to keep up with her usual regimen. 

“I’m waking up in the middle of the night, ‘cause I’m worried about something or there’s a heaviness,” she explained. “I try to make sure I get a workout in. Although there have been periods throughout this quarantine where I just have felt too low.”

“It is unusual,” Obama went on. “And it’s a direct result of being out of body, out of mind. Spiritually, these are not fulfilling times. I know that I am dealing with some form of low-grade depression. Not just because of the quarantine, but because of the racial strife, and just seeing this administration, watching the hypocrisy of it, day in and day out, is dispiriting.”

Later on in the podcast, Obama explained she’d “be remiss to say that part of this depression is also a result of what we’re seeing in terms of the protests, the continued racial unrest, that has plagued this country since its birth. I have to say that waking up to the news, waking up to how this administration has or has not responded, waking up to yet another story of a Black man or a Black person somehow being dehumanized, or hurt, or killed, or falsely accused of something, it is exhausting. And it has led to a weight that I haven’t felt in my life, in a while.”

According to research, Obama’s not the only one feeling the “psychological toll” of the pandemic and BLM events.

The Lancet Psychiatry, revealed that soon after the release of the video taken during George Floyd’s killing, rates of depression and anxiety among Black Americans skyrocketed at ones much greater than any other group.

According to The Washington Post “The rate of black Americans showing clinically significant signs of anxiety or depressive disorders jumped from 36 percent to 41 percent in the week after the video of Floyd’s death became public. That represents roughly 1.4 million more people.”

To cope, Obama explained that she’s tried to be kind to herself in moments when she’s feeling down.

“You have to recognize that you’re in a place, a bad place, in order to get out of it,” she explained in the episode. “You kinda have to sit in it for a minute, to know, oh, oh, I’m feeling off. So now I gotta feed myself with something better.”

If you or someone you know is experiencing depression please call the National Depressive/Manic-Depressive Association Hotline at 1-800-826-3632 or the Crisis Call Center’s 24-hour hotline at 1-775-784-8090. 

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Latinas Talk: Therapy Hangovers

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Latinas Talk: Therapy Hangovers

Scott Olson / Getty

For all of the societal issues and pressures that Latinas are currently dealing with today, no doubt it’s important for us to have access to mental health tools. Seeing a psychiatrist or therapist can help with managing the strange times we are currently experiencing or, at the very least, help us to cope with them. But diving deep into personal traumas and issues can have different effects for different people. For some, the period after a session can be brutal, like a therapy hangover. For others, it can be insightful and empowering.

Recently, in an effort to normalize therapy, we asked Latinas how they typically feel right after a session and the responses were pretty insightful.

Check them out below.

The period after the session can be emotional.

“Once a week! There is always work to be done on myself and navigating that with the right therapist makes a huge difference. As someone with depression and anxiety, I have to protect myself in these emotional times while also have a space to heal from past traumas.” – carina.s.cruz

It can make some people feel on top of the world.

“I don’t talk to a therapist anymore but I remember feeling so good after my sessions, my therapist was amazing and some days I miss having those sessions.” – lxandreaa

Sometimes it can feel like its the best part of the week.

“I used to do biweekly, but now I switched it to weekly. It’s honestly the best part of my week. I can let me guard down and I don’t have to pretend that everything is ok. It’s nice to have an hour to openly process my grief and get valuable insight that leaves me feeling stronger and empowered.” – alexis.eileennn

So helpful that sometimes it’s worth doubling up on sessions.

“Weekly! And if she plans a two-week vacation, two times a week! 😆 I’ve been going to her for five years. I can’t imagine my life without her rn.” – likekatiebutwithanh

But ultimately for many Latinas, the period after a session can be empowering.

“Every two weeks! I feel empowered. I feel lighter. I feel like I have a solid compass in hand helping me on my journey. It helped to find someone who understood BIPOC trauma and generational racism so that I didn’t have to validate my experiences at the onset. My only regret is that I didn’t do therapy earlier in my life.” – feliciagonzalezbrown 

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