Entertainment

This Is The Trippiest Commercial I’ve Seen But Somehow Cardi B And Reebok Make It Work And I Can’t Stop Watching

Reebok / YouTube

She has never shied away from getting the biggest, baddest, sharpest and most decorated nails around. But now Cardi B has been taken to the next level in the nail game with nails that come to life with just a thought and can act as new limbs.

In the latest campaign for her brand partnership with Reebok, released Tuesday, the rapper takes viewers to the beauty salon. 

Cardi B highlights her famous nails in latest ad with Reebok and it totally works.

Credit: @DailyMailCeleb / Twitter

A sneaker deal is a rapper’s rite of passage. And Cardi B has famously partnered with Fashion Nova and Steve Madden in the past, but last November she announced she would partner with Reebok, the classic sneaker and athletic-clothing brand.

On Tuesday, the company released a new advertisement, and at its center is the “Press” rapper. It’s absurdist, attention-grabbing, and completely Cardi B.

The video is next level Cardi B realness.

Credit: Reebok / YouTube

While chatting with a friend under hair dryers everyone in the shop is alerted to Cardi’s one untied sneaker. Without missing a beat, she wills her already long, pink, jewel encrusted nails to do the task for her.

The video sees her nails grow a few feet and work independently to tie up her shoe before retreating back to a more normal length. 

With a freshly tied pair of Reebok’s Classic Club C, she turns to a customer and simply says ‘nailed it.’ Living!

These are the hot tenís she’s rocking in her new commerical that she also played a part in designing.

Credit: @CardiBCrew / Twitter

Reebok spoke on the collab with Cardi, and said, “The film is a salute to Cardi’s own life experience, which saw her challenge expectations to become a self-made maven and incorporates boundary-pushing nail art that has become an iconic feature of her style.”

As for the shoes, Reebok describes vintage Club C’s as , “Take it down to pure essence with clean lines and a classic lineage. A Union Jack symbol along the side profile calls up heritage style. No excess, no riffraff. Made for icons.

And the shoes are currently on sale for $75.

People are absolutely living for her ad with the sneaker brand.

Credit: @CardiBCrew / Twitter

Even though it looks like, at least on Twitter, people didn’t even realize the rapper had a collab with Reebok.

But her ad seems to be working because people are already posting screenshots of them buying Cardi’s new shoes.

While some are calling the ad absurd and totally attention grabbing. But ain’t that straight up Cardi B?

Credit: @TheCuty / Twitter

I wouldn’t want anything less from Cardi B.

READ: The Debut Trailer For ‘Hustlers’ Opens With J.Lo Showing Constance Wu How To Pole Dance And It’s Already The Sexiest Scene I’ve Seen In A Movie In A Long Time

The Real-Life ‘Hustler’ Isn’t Thrilled Over J.Lo’s Depiction Of Her and Said Cardi B Should Have Played Her

Entertainment

The Real-Life ‘Hustler’ Isn’t Thrilled Over J.Lo’s Depiction Of Her and Said Cardi B Should Have Played Her

Jennifer Lopez cannot believe the incredibly positive reviews she’s getting over her lead role in the film “Hustlers.” She was so moved that she cried on national TV. Last week while being interviewed by Hoda Kotb, Lopez expressed her emotional reaction over the surprising reviews for her role, which some critics say could get her an Acadamy Award nomination. Here’s just a snippet of what film critics are saying about the film that made a big debut this weekend. “Hustlers asks what a movie like Goodfellas looks like with women at the center of the story,” one film critic said. “If nothing else, we get to see Jennifer Lopez command the screen as easily as Ramona does the stage, offering up a seductive awards-worthy performance that makes us remember why she became a movie star in the first place,” another said

There is at least one person who isn’t raving about Lopez’s role, and that’s the one who inspired the film. 

Samantha Barbash, the woman who inspired “Hustlers,” said she would have liked to have seen Cardi B in the lead role instead of Jennifer Lopez. 

Credit: Instagram/@iam_missfoxita

The 45-year-old said in an interview with Hollywood Life that rapper Cardi B should have portrayed her instead of the veteran actress, even though this is Cardi’s first film. “I said it from day one, even to the producer. Cardi doesn’t have the acting skills that Jennifer does, but Cardi could relate more to who I was because even though she wasn’t in the same club, we were in the same industry,” she told the lifestyle website. “If Cardi took some acting lessons and shadowed me, I’m sure that she would have played a better role for my character.”

Barbash goes on to say that she is flattered that Lopez wanted to play her in a movie but stresses that the film got several things wrong about her. 

Credit: Instagram/@iam_missfoxita

For starters, Barbash wasn’t a stripper at all. The film, based on a 2015 New York magazine article, shows Lopez as a stripper who ends up drugging wealthy bankers and robs them of their money. However, Barbash said she was never a stripper. Barbash actually worked at a strip club in New York City as a hostess. Yes, the other stuff about the drugs and taking their money is correct, but seeing Lopez play her a stripper didn’t sit well with her. Barbash also said that Lopez never reached out to her in order to learn about her mannerisms, which is what actors do when they’re portraying real-life characters. Even when the real-life character is deceased, actors still study old footage to learn more about the role they are playing. You may recall the extensive research Lopez said she did to portray Selena Quintanilla. She even slept in her bed to get into deep character.  

Earlier this year, Barbash said she would release her own memoir about the ordeal (which she did) that got her 5 years probation and said she planned to sue the filmmakers. 

Credit: Instagram/@iam_missfoxita

“This is a living nightmare,” Barbash said in April in the New York Post after videos leaked of Lopez on a stripper pole. “So now I’m going to have to do a lawsuit. I’m getting a gag order.” Bruno Gioffre, also said back then, that Barbash was “considering all legal avenues with the possibility injunctive relief, including a lawsuit.” The movie was made despite her legal threats. Today, Barbash is an entrepreneur and owns her own spa business. 

We can see why she would have preferred to see Cardi B in the title role. 

Credit: Instagram/@iamcardib

The Bronx rapper did admit to drugging men and robbing them, just like the characters did in the movie “Hustlers.” In 2017, Barbash was charged for conspiracy, assault, and grand larceny in exchange for five years probation

In March, Card admitted on social media that during her stint as a stripper in New York she too did what the “Hustlers” did in the movie. “I had to go strip, I had to go, ‘Oh yeah, you want to f*ck me? Yeah, yeah, yeah, let’s go to this hotel,’ and I drugged n*****s up and I robbed them. That’s what I used to do.” 

Soon after that post, Cardi said she it was wrong of her to do that and has since tried to make a better life for herself. 

READ: Critics Think Jennifer Lopez Gave An Oscar-Worthy Performance In ‘Hustlers’

 
 
 

Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

Culture

Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

NailzImage by Michelle Yip / Flickr

Acrylic nails have been a long-time fashion staple. Many of us have those early memories of a tía, a vecina, mom, etc., rocking the long red nails. Today, fake nails are not just a passing fad, but they have become an essential part of pop-culture, wearable art. Most famously, Cardi B (who has worn acrylics since before she was famous and has remained loyal to her same nail artist Jenny Bui) is one of the celebrities that has captivated the world which her famous “sets” which, no doubt, has inspired millions of fans.

Acrylic nails have always and will continue to be a woman’s strongest style accessory.

Credit: iamcardb / Instagram

One of the most iconic sets is part of a special exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. Back in the 90s, Lil Kim (the original Queen Bee) asked her manicurist – celebrity nail artist Bernadette Thompson – to add something different to the nail design for a photoshoot for the Junior M.A.F.I.A. single “Get Money.” Thinking on her feet, Thompson cut up a dollar bill and…the rest is history. Thompson is credited with moving nail art into the world of high fashion since she often had to fight against editors of Vogue, and other big-name fashion magazines, to feature the nail designs worn by the artist.

They can tell any story you want and make any statement you can imagine.

Credit: Pinterest

However, acrylics have been here long before celebrities and Instagram. One of the most famous manicures has even held Olympic gold, thanks to Hall of Famer, Florence Griffith Joyner. “Flo Jo” – still considered the fastest women in history – not only was she an iconic Olympian, but she was also known for her distinctive fierce style and nails.

Credit: Pinterest

If we look at the history of nail art, India is the first to put color on the map in 5000 B.C. and are credited with being the ones to dip fingertips in red henna, a practice which is still seen today.

Different cultures across the world have incorporated acrylic nails.

Credit: Pinterest

But where did the concept of acrylic nails come from? The earliest traces can be found somewhere around 3000 B.C between Egypt and China. We can thank ancient Egyptians for almost every aspect of the beauty and cosmetics that we use today. They also introduced the notion of associating red with power and nobility. Noblemen and women would use berries to add red hues to their nails and if anyone from the lower class was caught with red nails, they were put to death. It is believed that the ancient royal Egyptians used ivory, gold, and bone to create extensions of their nails. Shorter nails implied that you needed your hands available to work, therefore, longer nails became a symbol of status, wealth and non-laboring hands.

Around the same time period, the ancient Chinese were the first to make a “permanent color stain” that would taint nails the same as nail polish does today. Here is also where we have the closest example to modern-day acrylics. The earliest dynasties created elaborate “fingernail guards” which gave the appearance of exaggerated long nails. The nail extensions were made of gold and precious gems; and as with the ancient Egyptians, long nails became a symbol of a someone that did not need their hands free for manual labor and therefore became a symbol of the ruling class. The ornate nails were usually worn on one hand, covering each finger (except the thumb) and only the most elite wore fingernail guards on both hands.

Credit: Pinterest

In both Egypt and China, higher-ranking men and kings also sported the acrylics and nail polish. When King Tut’s tomb was discovered in 1922, among his treasures they found the royal red nail coloring still in a sealed bottle, and the paint was still good.

Ancient Greece also got in on early acrylic nails. They believed in the healing energy of the moon and favored the appearance of moon shape nails. Greek women would place pistachio nut shells over their nails and in order to give a pleasing round appearance.

In South America, the Incas of Peru, are said to have been the first to have actually created nail art, by adding a decorative element – an eagle – to their nails.

Credit: Pinterest

Over time, artificial nails were slowly making their way throughout Europe and eventually made their way across the ocean.

In 1934, Dr. Maxwell Lappe – a dentist from Chicago – was working on a remedy to help his patients who bit their nails. Mixing two dental acrylic products – liquid and powder – he created Nu Nails. The mixture was thick and heavy, meant to create a hard nail protective covering.

However, these are the first official artificial nails documented in modern history.

Credit Pour L’ Image / Facebook

During the 1930s, starlets –  like Greta Garbo –  often tried to create their own “nail extensions” by wrapping foil around their fingers and then painting the foil red.

In 1957, twenty years after Nu Nails, another dentist – Dr. Frederick Slack – made a breakthrough. As the story goes, he broke his own nail and in order to create a temporary fix, he used dental acrylic and aluminum foil, and accidentally invented the first sculpted acrylic nail. The Slack family went on launch the modern acrylic nail industry and has since created several innovative products, including the first non-yellowing bonding formula, which is still used today.

The nail game is constantly growing and evolving.  Today, we are in an acrylic boom again, nails are not only a part of our fashion, but they can also be part of the larger conversation.

Your set can reflect your politics, religion, heritage etc.

Credit: Pinterest

Acrylic nails and nail art aren’t going anywhere, they have been here since the days of B.C. and will most likely continue to always be part of our human story. Although women of color in the United States are often chastised for wearing long and elaborate nails, it has never stopped us from doing so, nor should it. We are walking in the traditions of ancient royals and nobility – men and women – so continue to hold your head high, pick your colors, add some bling and don’t be shy; tú dale, and make the ancient world proud…live boldly.

READ: Cardi B’s Blinged Out Nails Have Inspired Reebok New Dazzling Limited-Edition Shoe