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If You Claim To Be A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Better Be Informed About These 20 Paintings By Her

Throughout her life’s work, Frida Kahlo created paintings that depicted her life, culture, Mexicanidad, indigeneity, grief, and suffering. The serious subject matter of her work has long been lauded by art critics and fans of her work alike.

Here’s a look at Kahlo’s 20 most popular portraits.

1. The Two Fridas

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This oil painting which was part of Kahlo’s Naïve art period depicts two versions of Kahlo sitting side by side together. One wears a white European-style Victorian dress while the other is wearing a traditional Tehuana dress. Some suggest that the two figures are a representation of Frida’s dual heritage.

2. The Broken Column

This oil painting made in 1944 was created by Kahlo shortly after she had spinal surgery to correct chronic problems from a serious traffic accident. In this painting, Frida aligns herself with the martyr Saint Sebastian who was discovered to be a Christian and tied to a tree and used as an archery target.

3. The Wounded Deer

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This painting created around the end of Kahlo’s life was made when her health was on a downward spiral. In this oil painting, Kahlo combines pre-Columbian, Buddhist, and Christian symbols to express her influences and beliefs.

4. Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird

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Kahlo created this self-portrait after her divorce from Diego Rivera and the end of her affair with photographer Nickolas Muray. The painting brings into coordination Frida’s identification with indigenous Mexican culture which greatly affected her painting aesthetic. Kahlo’s use of powerful iconography from her indigenous Mexican roots asserts hers sense of rebellion against colonial forces and male rule.

In this photo, the dead hummingbird around her neck represents a good luck charm. The black panther in the background is a symbol of bad luck and death and the monkey is meant to represent evil.

5. Without Hope

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On the back of this painting which was created by Kahlo in 1954, Kahlo wrote  “Not the least hope remains to me…Everything move in time with what the belly contains.” She created this painting after her father prescribed her to be force fed.

6. Diego and I

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In this painting, Frida reveals the anguish she feels about her relationship with Diego Rivera. The portrait reveals her deep pain and hurt over his infidelity and affair with film actress Maria Felix.

7. Self-Portrait with Monkey

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In Mexican mythology, monkeys are a symbol of lust. In this portrait, however, the monkeys are adoring, loving and nurturing. Kahlo’s decision to depict monkeys is consistent with her constant incorporation of them as companions. In life, Frida kept monkeys as well as many other pets in the garden of her Blue House in Mexico.

8. Self-Portrait as a Tehuana

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This painting which was painted in 1940 was made after she and Diego divorced. The painting has two other names “Diego in My Thoughts” and “Thinking of Diego.” This painting reveals Frida’s consumption with  Diego Rivera, who continued to have affairs with other women throughout their relationship.

Even despite his betrayals, she could not stop thinking about him and portrayed this by painting a small portrait of him on her brow which depicts her obsessive love for him.

9. Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair

Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair

Kahlo painted this self-portrait during a particularly difficult time in her life. Frida’s husband Diego Rivera had long told Frida of how much she admired her long, dark hair, which, are depicted in the tresses on the floor of the painting. After they broke up she cut off her hair. In this picture, she shows herself sitting in an oversized suit that resembles the ones that Rivera often wore.

10. What the Water Gave Me

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What the Water Gave Me (Lo que el agua me dio in Spanish) the artist creates her own biography.  As the scholar, Natascha Steed, points out, “her paintings were all very honest and she never portrayed herself as being more or less beautiful than she actually was.”

11. The Suicide of Dorothy Hale

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Dorothy Hale is an American act and Ziegfeld showgirl who died by suicide in 1938. Kahlo was commissioned to create a portrait of the actress by a friend and to their surprise, she created a severe retelling of her ultimate death.

12. Henry Ford Hospital (The Flying Bed)

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Frida depicts herself in this painting lying in a bed in Henry Ford Hospital naked and bleeding. The painting depicts the discomfort Frida felt during her time in the hospital. In the painting, six objects fly around her. There’s a male fetus which is the son of her and Diego that she lost. There is an orchid which looks like a uterus. The snail is the symbol of how slow the miscarriage and operation took.

13. The Love Embrace of the Universe, the Earth (Mexico), Myself, Diego, and Señor Xolotl

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This portrait comes folded with multiple forms of imagery. In this portrait, Frida shows “twofold face of the Universe, the light and dark background of planets and ethereal fog, is holding a murkier Earth (Mexico), whose breasts are lactating. The Earth (Mexico), with all her vegetation, is subsequently holding Frida Kahlo. Continuing further, Frida is then holding a nude Diego Rivera, whose forehead contains a third eye.

This work is rich in symbolism, with multiple layers of meaning. However, the symbols are not unlike many of Kahlo’s other works. Many art critics have contended that The Love Embrace portrays several of Frida’s life struggles, including but not limited to: womanhood, motherhood and Diego Rivera.”

14. My Grandparents, My Parents and Me

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Frida Kahlo depicts her family in this portrait of a family tree. In this piece, she is a naked girl holding onto a red ribbon that represents of her bloodline.

15. A Few Small Nips (Passionately in Love)

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In 1935, a year after not painting, she created A Few Small Nips, in which she portrays the torture she feels over her pain. In the painting, a bare and bloodied Frida lies on a bed in the face of a knife-wielding killer.

16. Viva la Vida, Watermelons

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Eight days before her death, Frida wrote the words “Viva la Vida – Coyoacán 1954 Mexico” into her drawing of the watermelons.

17. The Wounded Table

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Like many of Frida’s paintings this piece reflects strongly on her Mexicanidad, indigeneity, as well as her grief and loss. The painting is depicted much like Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last SupperMural.  Kahlo is seated at the center of the table and figures that were portrayed in her painting The Four Inhabitants of Mexico City also appear.

18. My Dress Hangs There

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Frida started this painting while living in New York and finished it soon after she and Diego moved back to Mexico. On the back of the  painting in chalk she wrote “I painted this in New York when Diego was painting the mural in Rockefeller Center”.

“The painting is filled with the icons of modern industrial society of United States but implied the society is decaying and the fundamental human values are destructed. In contrast to this painting, her husband Diego Rivera was working on a mural in the Rockefeller Center to prove his approval of the industrial progress in America”

19. Self-portrait in a Velvet Dress

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In this self-portrait, Frida wears a wine-red velvet dress. The painting is one of the most flattering portraits of Kahlo and was created during the start of her career as an artist. In letters, she wrote, about the portrait. “You cannot imagine how marvelous it is to wait for you, serenely as in the portrait.”

20. Girl with Death Mask (She Plays Alone)

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In 1938 Frida painted this portrait which depicts  Frida herself at age of four as she wearsa skull mask. This mask is a tradition for “Day of the Dead” wear and where death is celebrated instead of mourned. The little is depicts Frida holding a yellow flower in her hands which Mexicans put on graves at the “Day of the Dead” festival.


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A Homeowners Association Tried To Keep A Boricua Who Fought For Our Country From Flying Her PR Flag

Culture

A Homeowners Association Tried To Keep A Boricua Who Fought For Our Country From Flying Her PR Flag

screenshot taken from Orlando Sentinel

When hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans came together to demand former Gov. Ricardo Rosselló to resign following leaked chats that revealed political corruption and a series of sexist and homophobic messages, Frances Santiago wanted to stand in solidarity with her people. Living in Kissimmee, Florida, she wasn’t able to protest with her country folk on the archipelago but she demonstrated symbolically by placing her red, white and blue Puerto Rican flag outside of her home. 

Now, the Central Florida Boricua is facing a battle against her own community leaders. Three weeks after putting up the flag, the homeowner received a letter from the Rolling Hills Estates Homeowners Association requesting her to take it down. 

Santiago, an Army veteran who served 14 years as a medic, including two tours in Iraq, says she refuses to remove the flag.

“I fought for this, to be able to do this. So, I don’t see a problem with flying my flag here,” the woman told Orlando-area news station WFTV.

According to HOA bylaws, all flags are outlawed. However, the board made an exception for US flags, sports flags and flags used to honor first responders and fallen officers. Considering these edicts, Santiago is unsure why the group is asking her to remove the flag, as Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States.

“Puerto Rico is part of America. What’s the big issue with us having our flag there,” she said.

HOA president Norma McNerney told  WFTV that she’s not asking the Santiago family to remove the flag because it’s from Puerto Rico; however, she did not comment on the island being the colonial property of the US and, thus, meeting the association’s criterion. 

“We treat all owners the same. If you travel through our community, you will see the only flags are those regulated by the state,” McNerney said.

Puerto Ricans have historically been banned from displaying their flag. 

While many tease that Boricuas exhibit their bandera on anything and everything, from their cars and house goods to their clothes and accessories, owning a Puerto Rican flag wasn’t legal until 1957. Nine years prior, on June 10, 1948, la Ley de La Mordaza, better known as the gag law, made it a crime to own or display a Puerto Rican flag, sing a patriotic song or speak or write of independence. The legislation, signed into law by Jesús T. Piñero, the United States-appointed governor, aimed at suppressing the growing movement to liberate Puerto Rico from its colonial ties to the United States. Anyone accused and found guilty of disobeying the law could be sentenced to ten years in prison, be fined $10,000 or both.

Additionally, in Kissimmee, which locals nicknamed “Little Puerto Rico” because of its vast Puerto Rican population, there has been pushback from community members who are not pleased with the demographic changes. City-Data forums warn people interested in moving to Central Florida to beware of Puerto Ricans, who commenters refer to as “roaches,” “criminals,” and the N-word, while news of attacks against Boricuas has become more common. Florida is home to more Puerto Ricans in the contiguous US than any other state. Most of the population resides in the Orlando-Kissimmee area. The region has been the top destination for Puerto Ricans escaping the financial crisis since 2008 and displacement following Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017. But it is also the prime journey stop for diasporic Puerto Ricans from New York, Chicago, New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Massachusetts. The area is among the largest and fastest-growing Puerto Rican communities in the country.

As such, Central Florida Boricuas have rallied around Santiago. An online petition created by the Florida Puerto Rican group Alianza for Progress is asking the HOA to cease their discriminatory practices against Santiago and is already close to meeting its goal of 1,600 signatures. At the time of writing, it is short just 51 names.

Santiago and her husband Efrain have insisted that they have no intention of bringing the flag down.

“[The flag] will stay there and we’ll deal with it; we’ll exhaust every avenue possible,” Efrain said. “We have our house, you see, up to standards. We’re not doing anything wrong. We’re not doing anything to our neighbors by flying our flag.”

While the Santiagos haven’t presently been issued any fines for the violation, they said they do have a lawyer and are prepared to take this fight to protect their freedom further. “I’m proud of my roots, who I am, [where] I come from. We’re not offending anyone. None of the neighbors were offended with us putting the flag there,” Efrain said.

Read: The Governor Of Puerto Rico Was Caught In A Chat Using Grotesque Homophobic And Sexist Language And The Entire Island Is Calling Him To Resign In Massive Protests

This Peruvian Queen Has Been Brought Back To Life In An Ultra-Realistic Sculpture And People Cannot Believe She’s Not Real

Things That Matter

This Peruvian Queen Has Been Brought Back To Life In An Ultra-Realistic Sculpture And People Cannot Believe She’s Not Real

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Have you ever wondered what your ancestors looked like — if you shared the same cheekbones, hair texture, skin tone or smile? Sure, some of us have seen illustrated reimaginings of our ancient forebearers, but there still remains a longing to know what they might have looked, felt or sounded like in real life. In Sweden, one man is using his artistic talents and archeological knowledge to give us a glimpse of our primordial relatives.

Oscar Nilsson is a sculptor and archaeologist who specializes in reconstructing faces.

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Since the 1990s, he’s been using his skills to hand-sculpt the faces of people who lived hundreds to thousands of years ago. Through his company, O.D. Nilssons, the creative works with various museums to help restore faces of people whose remains were discovered during archaeological excavations.

In the past two decades, Nilsson has revived more than a dozen primitive individuals. He has restructured a young woman from the Stone Age, who lived in what is now Brighton, United Kingdom about 5,500 years ago. His reimaginings show that people who originally inhabited the area weren’t white but rather a deep brown that resembles those from North Africa. He recreated the face of an 18-year-old girl who lived in modern-day Greece about 7,000 years before Christ; a malnourished, anemic man who lived during the Bronze Age about 3,700 years ago; and a well-built man with a “Suebian knot” who lived in Britain about 2,400 years ago in the Iron Age.

In addition to the unnamed progenitors, Nilsson has also used unearthed remains to restructure the faces of leaders of the past world. Through his work, he has brought to life Birger Jarl, the ruler of Sweden from 1248 until his death on Oct. 1, 1266, as well as Estrid Sigfastsdotter, a rich woman who lived in XI century AD near Stockholm and died around the age of 80 at a time when the life expectancy was about 35 years old.

One of our favorite Nilsson reconstructions, however, is that of Huarmey Queen, a Wari monarch woman from what is today northwest Peru.

Credit: odnilsson.com

In 2012, a Polish archeological group found a burial of the indigenous Wari culture, which would later become the Incan Empire. The tomb carried the remains of 58 noblewomen of different ages, all buried with “extraordinary luxuries.” Huarmey Queen, for instance, was entombed with jewelry, gold ear flares, a silver goblet, a copper ceremonial axe and expensive textiles, among other splendors. In his sculpture, the woman is seen aged, with peppered hair and wrinkled skin. She has deep brown eyes, sharp cheekbones, lightly golden skin and large gauges in her ears.

Nilsson is able to make his restorations through a process that requires much time, patience, skill as well as anatomical, archaeological and historical understanding. The sculptor uses skulls discovered during archaeological digs as his base. He digitally scans the remains in an effort to perfectly map the craniums, using a 3D printer to rebuild them. With his knowledge of anatomy, he then overlays the restructured skulls with muscles. Using DNA analysis of the corpse as well as the surroundings of the site where the remains were found, he adds details like skin, hair, eye color and clothing.

In his work, he uses skin-pigmented silicone, actual human hair — which he inserts strand by strand — and prosthetic eyes. The entire process for one face restructure takes about 200 hours.

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“The human face is a motif that never ceases to fascinate me: the variation of the underlying structure as well as the variety in details seem endless,” he says on his website. “And all the faces I reconstruct are unique. They are all individuals.”

As a university student, the artist studied archaeology, hoping to become a forensic artist. The man, who says he is fascinated by faces and history, told the DailyMail that he “wanted to see what the people from history look like.”  

Through his collaborations with museums, which hire him to recreate faces for various historical exhibitions, he is also able to give people a glimpse of what their own ancestors looked like. For him, his human-like sculptures are both a window into the past as well as a way to engage youth in history.

“I hope people get a feeling of ’I know this guy,’” he said. “It is the most effective way to make history relevant, especially to the younger generations.”

Read: The Aztecs Built It Out Of Human Skulls And Archeologists Are Starting To Uncover Its Mysteries

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