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If You Claim To Be A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Better Be Informed About These 20 Paintings By Her

Throughout her life’s work, Frida Kahlo created paintings that depicted her life, culture, Mexicanidad, indigeneity, grief, and suffering. The serious subject matter of her work has long been lauded by art critics and fans of her work alike.

Here’s a look at Kahlo’s 20 most popular portraits.

1. The Two Fridas

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This oil painting which was part of Kahlo’s Naïve art period depicts two versions of Kahlo sitting side by side together. One wears a white European-style Victorian dress while the other is wearing a traditional Tehuana dress. Some suggest that the two figures are a representation of Frida’s dual heritage.

2. The Broken Column

This oil painting made in 1944 was created by Kahlo shortly after she had spinal surgery to correct chronic problems from a serious traffic accident. In this painting, Frida aligns herself with the martyr Saint Sebastian who was discovered to be a Christian and tied to a tree and used as an archery target.

3. The Wounded Deer

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This painting created around the end of Kahlo’s life was made when her health was on a downward spiral. In this oil painting, Kahlo combines pre-Columbian, Buddhist, and Christian symbols to express her influences and beliefs.

4. Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird

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Kahlo created this self-portrait after her divorce from Diego Rivera and the end of her affair with photographer Nickolas Muray. The painting brings into coordination Frida’s identification with indigenous Mexican culture which greatly affected her painting aesthetic. Kahlo’s use of powerful iconography from her indigenous Mexican roots asserts hers sense of rebellion against colonial forces and male rule.

In this photo, the dead hummingbird around her neck represents a good luck charm. The black panther in the background is a symbol of bad luck and death and the monkey is meant to represent evil.

5. Without Hope

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On the back of this painting which was created by Kahlo in 1954, Kahlo wrote  “Not the least hope remains to me…Everything move in time with what the belly contains.” She created this painting after her father prescribed her to be force fed.

6. Diego and I

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In this painting, Frida reveals the anguish she feels about her relationship with Diego Rivera. The portrait reveals her deep pain and hurt over his infidelity and affair with film actress Maria Felix.

7. Self-Portrait with Monkey

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In Mexican mythology, monkeys are a symbol of lust. In this portrait, however, the monkeys are adoring, loving and nurturing. Kahlo’s decision to depict monkeys is consistent with her constant incorporation of them as companions. In life, Frida kept monkeys as well as many other pets in the garden of her Blue House in Mexico.

8. Self-Portrait as a Tehuana

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This painting which was painted in 1940 was made after she and Diego divorced. The painting has two other names “Diego in My Thoughts” and “Thinking of Diego.” This painting reveals Frida’s consumption with  Diego Rivera, who continued to have affairs with other women throughout their relationship.

Even despite his betrayals, she could not stop thinking about him and portrayed this by painting a small portrait of him on her brow which depicts her obsessive love for him.

9. Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair

Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair

Kahlo painted this self-portrait during a particularly difficult time in her life. Frida’s husband Diego Rivera had long told Frida of how much she admired her long, dark hair, which, are depicted in the tresses on the floor of the painting. After they broke up she cut off her hair. In this picture, she shows herself sitting in an oversized suit that resembles the ones that Rivera often wore.

10. What the Water Gave Me

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What the Water Gave Me (Lo que el agua me dio in Spanish) the artist creates her own biography.  As the scholar, Natascha Steed, points out, “her paintings were all very honest and she never portrayed herself as being more or less beautiful than she actually was.”

11. The Suicide of Dorothy Hale

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Dorothy Hale is an American act and Ziegfeld showgirl who died by suicide in 1938. Kahlo was commissioned to create a portrait of the actress by a friend and to their surprise, she created a severe retelling of her ultimate death.

12. Henry Ford Hospital (The Flying Bed)

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Frida depicts herself in this painting lying in a bed in Henry Ford Hospital naked and bleeding. The painting depicts the discomfort Frida felt during her time in the hospital. In the painting, six objects fly around her. There’s a male fetus which is the son of her and Diego that she lost. There is an orchid which looks like a uterus. The snail is the symbol of how slow the miscarriage and operation took.

13. The Love Embrace of the Universe, the Earth (Mexico), Myself, Diego, and Señor Xolotl

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This portrait comes folded with multiple forms of imagery. In this portrait, Frida shows “twofold face of the Universe, the light and dark background of planets and ethereal fog, is holding a murkier Earth (Mexico), whose breasts are lactating. The Earth (Mexico), with all her vegetation, is subsequently holding Frida Kahlo. Continuing further, Frida is then holding a nude Diego Rivera, whose forehead contains a third eye.

This work is rich in symbolism, with multiple layers of meaning. However, the symbols are not unlike many of Kahlo’s other works. Many art critics have contended that The Love Embrace portrays several of Frida’s life struggles, including but not limited to: womanhood, motherhood and Diego Rivera.”

14. My Grandparents, My Parents and Me

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Frida Kahlo depicts her family in this portrait of a family tree. In this piece, she is a naked girl holding onto a red ribbon that represents of her bloodline.

15. A Few Small Nips (Passionately in Love)

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In 1935, a year after not painting, she created A Few Small Nips, in which she portrays the torture she feels over her pain. In the painting, a bare and bloodied Frida lies on a bed in the face of a knife-wielding killer.

16. Viva la Vida, Watermelons

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Eight days before her death, Frida wrote the words “Viva la Vida – Coyoacán 1954 Mexico” into her drawing of the watermelons.

17. The Wounded Table

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Like many of Frida’s paintings this piece reflects strongly on her Mexicanidad, indigeneity, as well as her grief and loss. The painting is depicted much like Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last SupperMural.  Kahlo is seated at the center of the table and figures that were portrayed in her painting The Four Inhabitants of Mexico City also appear.

18. My Dress Hangs There

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Frida started this painting while living in New York and finished it soon after she and Diego moved back to Mexico. On the back of the  painting in chalk she wrote “I painted this in New York when Diego was painting the mural in Rockefeller Center”.

“The painting is filled with the icons of modern industrial society of United States but implied the society is decaying and the fundamental human values are destructed. In contrast to this painting, her husband Diego Rivera was working on a mural in the Rockefeller Center to prove his approval of the industrial progress in America”

19. Self-portrait in a Velvet Dress

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In this self-portrait, Frida wears a wine-red velvet dress. The painting is one of the most flattering portraits of Kahlo and was created during the start of her career as an artist. In letters, she wrote, about the portrait. “You cannot imagine how marvelous it is to wait for you, serenely as in the portrait.”

20. Girl with Death Mask (She Plays Alone)

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In 1938 Frida painted this portrait which depicts  Frida herself at age of four as she wearsa skull mask. This mask is a tradition for “Day of the Dead” wear and where death is celebrated instead of mourned. The little is depicts Frida holding a yellow flower in her hands which Mexicans put on graves at the “Day of the Dead” festival.


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Frida The Rescue Dog, Who Saved Lives During the 2017 Mexico Earthquake, Retires After 10 Years

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Frida The Rescue Dog, Who Saved Lives During the 2017 Mexico Earthquake, Retires After 10 Years

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After being part of over 50 rescue operations, saving dozens of lives and finding over 40 bodies in disaster areas, Frida, a 10-year-old Labrador retriever, is calling it quits. The Mexican Navy held a ceremony for Frida that was part of “International Rescuer Day” in Mexico this past Sunday. Frida was honored with a toy that the Mexican government said: “symbolized the beginning of her new life.”

Frida became a national hero in Mexico during deadly earthquakes that killed more than 300 people in Mexico City in 2017.

After a disastrous magnitude-7.1 earthquake rocked Mexico in September 2017, the pup became a household name. Two devastating earthquakes shook Mexico just days apart killing more than 300 people, including 205 in Mexico City. The quakes destroyed and caused major damage to multiple structures.

Frida helped in rescue efforts in both disasters as she assisted in finding more than 40 bodies and saving 12 lives. She was famously captured sniffing her way through rubble as part of the Mexican navy’s canine unite. Images showed the K-9 wearing goggles and neoprene booties as she joined first responders looking for the children that died in a school in Mexico City during the earthquake.

In total, there were 15 dogs that were deployed during the search and rescue but Frida quickly garnered the most attention. “Her bark always gave hope, and in moments of pain and uncertainty she brought relief,” Eduardo Redondo, a Deputy Naval Minister, told the BBC.

Frida’s journey as a rescue dog began before the devastating 2017 earthquake.

Ten-year-old Frida was part of multiple rescue missions involving earthquakes not only in Mexico but also in Ecuador in 2016 and Haiti in 2010. Frida was also part of rescue efforts in 2013 after an explosion at the headquarters of Mexican state oil company Pemex. She was also part of the rescue team that helped find victims after the 2012 landslide in Guatemala.

Frida was honored with a statue last year for her rescue efforts.

Frida’s international fame has made her a national symbol of Mexican strength and pride. Last summer she received a bronze statue on her honor, along with her trainer, Israel Arauz, by her side, at a park in Puebla City.

The plaque on the statue reads: “Memorable symbols of strength that Mexicans can have when we decide to unite for a greater cause.”

People on social media expressed their gratitude for Frida on an amazing career.

Credit: @zazulturqueza / Twitter

There has been so much love and appreciation for Frida after news broke that she was calling it a career. People who never knew or even previously heard of her took to social media to share their appreciation for Frida’s work.

“Today Frida, the heroic Mexican Navy rescue dog, retires. She saved many lives and during the Mexico City earthquake of 2017, she became a national hero and symbol of hope. GRACIAS FRIDA!,” one user wrote.

Even actor Chris Evans chimed in on Frida’s retirement asking: “What did we do to deserve dogs?” I think after hearing Frida’s incredible story we are all asking ourselves the same thing.

“Frida stole the heart of all Mexico and thousands more abroad… Her bark always gave hope, and in moments of pain and uncertainty she brought relief,” said Deputy Naval Minister Eduardo Redondo, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP). “Frida, mission accomplished, with honor.”

READ: This Mexican Dog Has His Own Instagram Account And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

Meet Amparo Garrido, The Actress Whose Voice Everyone Has Mistaken For Frida Kahlo

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Meet Amparo Garrido, The Actress Whose Voice Everyone Has Mistaken For Frida Kahlo

This month, the Mexican government announced that it had discovered the first known audio recording of Frida Kahlo’s voice. But after multiple skeptics with ties to Kahlo, including relatives and former students, shared their doubts, it seems clear that the recording isn’t of the famed Mexican painter after all. However, the woman in the clip who was likely mistaken for Kahlo is somewhat of a hidden Mexican badass herself: Amparo Garrido.

A popular dubbing artist, Garrido played the voice of Snow White when Disney dubbed the 1937 classic film in the 1960s. The actress also voiced Bambi’s mother when it too was made for a Spanish audience and played several youthful characters on radio shows at the start of her career. In addition to her work in children’s films and programs, Garrido also worked on El Bachiller, a Mexican radio program in the 1950s. 

On June 13, a clip from El Bachiller was found by archivists from Televisa Radio’s who were digitizing and preserving a collection donated by the late Mexican broadcaster and screenwriter Álvaro Gálvez y Fuentes. In the recording, a voice believed to be Kahlo’s reads from the artist’s 1949 essay “Portrait of Diego,” where she describes her husband, muralist Diego Rivera. “He is a gigantic, immense child, with a friendly face and a sad gaze,” the woman reads.

Garrido, however, believes the voice is hers.

“When listening to this audio I remembered some things and I got excited because I did recognize myself,” she told El Universal.

Garrido was made aware of the recording from her son, who identified his mother’s voice as soon as he heard it.

“When I watched a television program, I heard a voice that I recognized as my mother’s, and in the program they said it was Frida Kahlo, which I thought was very strange, because I noticed that it was a voice of an actress or an announcer, that is, a studied voice, with nuances, ” her son Ismael Eduardo Larumbe added.

When he showed the recording to his brothers, they all agreed with him.

“They also told me that it was my mom. [The audio] is very much in time, form and circumstance when my mom recorded very often with El Bachiller, and her tone, coloratura and intention are practically the same,” he continued.

Larumbe said he is sure it’s not Kahlo’s voice in the recording because “it is a studied voice [and] there is no poet who reads his poems like a declaimer.”

Kahlo’s relatives and former students don’t think it’s the iconized painter, either. 

“As far as Kahlo family knows, there are no records of Frida’s voice,” they said in a statement, according to the Guardian.

Two of her art students, Arturo Estrada Hernández and Guillermo Monroy Becerril, also noted that the voice in the clip didn’t sound like that of their one-time teacher.

“The thing is, I don’t recognize the voice,” Becerril said. “The first time I met her, I noticed she was a woman with a very sweet, cheerful voice … Frida’s real voice was very lively, charming, and cheery. It wasn’t serious or smooth or delicate … it was crystal clear.”

It is also unlikely that Kahlo, who died in 1954, was well enough to voice the recording, which was broadcast the following year.

“That makes things difficult, because in 1954, she was in hospital practically the whole time. And besides, the voice is rather an affected one,” Larumbe said.

As more information surrounding the viral recording of one of the most famous painters of all time come forward, it seems less and less likely that the voice heard is that of Kahlo. But while archivists may not have discovered what they initially believed they did, they did shine a spotlight on another Mexican voice that many of us, who watched Spanish-language Disney classic films in our home countries, enjoyed growing up.

Read: Frida Kahlo’s Former Students Deny Claims That The Recording Thought To Be Her Voice Is Actually Hers

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