Entertainment

RIP To George A. Romero, The Director Who Influenced Most Of The Zombie Movies You Love

Film director George A. Romero died on Sunday after battling lung cancer. He was 77.

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If you’re not familiar with the work of Romero but love horror films and watch zombie shows, then it’s safe to say that you’ve experienced his unique vision.

One of his most famous films is the 1968 classic “Night of the Living Dead.”

Via: SianDC / YouTube

Back when the movie came out, critics didn’t praise the film. In fact, they wrote it off as silly. But as The New York Times reports, the movie “gained an audience at the late-night drive-in and grindhouse circuit.”

As time passed, the film was celebrated for its sharp social commentary.

In interviews, Romero said the lead character, Ben, was not written as black. But Romero felt Duane Jones was the best actor for the role, which added an extra layer of social commentary to the film. Romero told NPR: “We never thought of it being a racial piece at all, never. We were talking much more about how people remain stuck on their own agendas even though there’s something extraordinary going on outside.”

In 1999, more than 30 years since the release of “Night of the Living Dead,” the movie was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Other prestigious films in that registry include Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest,” Robert Altman’s “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” and Elia Kazan’s “East of Eden.”

Romero was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1940 to a Cuban father and Lithuanian mother.

Facebook/Night Of The Living Dead 247

In 2008, Romero spoke to The New York Daily News about what it was like to grow up in the Bronx.

“But because of our name I was labeled a Latino and I was in an Italian neighborhood, so it was difficult but I still had good times.”

He also talked about wanting to visit Cuba, the homeland of his father.

I think I can go back now. Living in Toronto, Canada, I think I can get down there. I’d really love to,” Romero said in 2008. “We went to Cuba right before Castro. [My father] still had his family there. We went a couple of times to visit his family in the summer time when I was off school. I was in my midteens.”

In the 1960s, Romero began his filmmaking career shortly after graduating from the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University.

His first film was a short titled “Expostulations” and was released in 1962. Six years later, he released his groundbreaking film “Night of the Living Dead.” Then came “Dawn of the Dead,” as well as “The Crazies and Martin.”

Romero also directed “Day of the Dead.”

Via: Arrow Video / YouTube

His style of directing and fascination with zombies and the dead have inspired countless of shows and movies we have seen today.

Director Edgar Wright (“Baby Driver,” “Shawn of the Dead”) said all of his movies are inspired by Romero’s vision.

http://www.edgarwrighthere.com/

In a very touching post, Wright talked about how much he looked up to Romero and admired his work.

“I had been infatuated about George’s work before I saw it, scouring through horror and fantasy magazines for stills, posters, and articles way before I was old enough to see his movies,” Wright said. “Without George, at the very least, my career would have started very differently.”

Robert Kirkman, creator of “The Walking Dead,” also credited Romero with inspiring him to create the popular comic and TV series.

Director Zack Snyder (“300,” “Watchmen,” “Batman v Superman”) described Romero as a “master.”

And Jordan Peele, director of the popular horror film “Get Out,” also tipped his cap to Romero.

READ: 17 Perfectly Creepy Horror Movies By Latinos To Watch Before You Die

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A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Culture

A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Social media is where people can show off just about anything they create. This includes art in any and all media, like pancake art. Claudia, the creator behind Nappan Pancake art, is the latest artist watching their art reach the masses.

Claudia, the artist behind Nappan Pancake art, got her start because of the pandemic.

@nappancakes

casi ✨1 año✨haciendo #pancakeart 🥞 #parati #foryou #viral #trend #glowup #art #foryoupage

♬ Inox la bggg – ᗰᗩᖇIE ᗰOI ᑎᗩᖇᑌTO

The artist first started to play around with pancake art last spring break when the pandemic forced businesses and schools to close. Claudia wanted to get more creative with her kids’ breakfasts since they were now always at home.

“I started experimenting with making Pancake art,” Claudia recalls to mitú. “At first I only used the color of the natural dough and a little cocoa. At first, I just used the ketchup dispensers and little by little I learned.”

Claudia uses her pancake art to honor some truly iconic people.

@nappancakes

Responder a @detodoun_poco233 Cepillín ✨🥞✨ en nuestros ♥️ #parati #fy #HijosAdopTiktoks #adoptiktoks #viral #foryou @cepillintv #pancakeart ncakeart

♬ La Feria de Cepillin – Cepillín

Cepillín recently died and the loss was felt throughout the community. He made our lives joyous and fun with his music, especially his birthday song. Some of the creations are done for fans who request to see their faves turned into delicious pancake art.

The artist loves creating the edible works of art.

The journey of becoming a pancake artist has been a fun adventure for Claudia and her children. The more she has practiced, the more she has been able to do.

“Sometimes I scream with excitement and I go to all the members of my house to see it,” Claudia says about her successes. “Other times it’s just a feeling like “disappointment could be better” other times it just breaks or burns and then I just cry but it usually feels very satisfying.”

You can check out all of her creations on TikTok.

@nappancakes

Responder a @reyna100804santoyo siii🥞✨ díganle que me adopte 🥺 @ederbez #adoptiktoks #hijosadoptiktoks #parati #foryou #viral #fy #art #pancakeart

♬ Little Bitty Pretty One – Thurston Harris

With 350,000 followers and growing, it won’t be long until more people start to fully enjoy Claudia’s art. Her children can’t get enough of it and she is so excited to share it with the rest of the world.

READ: Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

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These Terrariums And Fairy Gardens Are A Lil’ Homies Dream Come True

Culture

These Terrariums And Fairy Gardens Are A Lil’ Homies Dream Come True

Lil’ Homies are one toy that we all remember. They little figurines were so much more to us than little toys that we got from toy vending machines. Adrian Ortiz is using them to create something magical and giving people a non-Eurocentric take on terrariums.

Adrian Ortiz is giving Lil’ Homies their own terrariums in which to flourish.

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A post shared by @botanical_homie

Ortiz understands the cultural importance of Lil’ Homies because it was one of the first times he saw himself represented, like so many of us. The toys were a welcomed moment of representation for Ortiz after spending so many years seeing so many white narratives in the media and toys.

“I started making terrariums with Lil’ Homies in them as the figures because I noticed how traditional fairy gardens were always representing white/European figures,” Ortiz told mitú. “I thought about how perfect they were in size. I wanted to dedicate my art page to the idea of people of color existing and participating in nature.”

Ortiz feels supported from his followers as well as his boyfriend. His art has been a welcomed breath of culturally relevant plant art in people’s social media feeds.

The ongoing pandemic gave Ortiz a chance to dive deeper into a hobby he already had: plants.

“I have always been into plants and nature since I was a kid and I began making terrariums and fairy gardens in the past year to deal with the pandemic like so many others,” Ortiz says. “There is something super special about making miniature tiny living worlds. I wanted to make fairy gardens but I ended up with something halfway between terrariums and fairy gardens but with cholos. So I created the ‘Brown People Indoor Miniature Gardening TikTok’ series on my tik tok account.”

Ortiz’s TikTok account, aptly named @botanical_homie, has more than 7,000 followers showing that people are really into the idea of Lil’ Homies living their fairy garden dreams.

The terrariums are another chance for people of color to be represented in the world.

Ortiz was in an arts school for middle and high school. In that time, the school fostered an understanding of racial injustices and introduced Ortiz to the concept of artivism, art as activism. It was, according to Ortiz, a moment when he realized that he wanted to dedicate his art to BIPOC.

“I grew up and live in Colorado and have seen the lack of access BIPOC have to outdoor activities like hiking and mountain climbing,” Ortiz explains. “These are white-dominated sports and activities that some POC never get to experience. I want to create a world where we can be anything and do everything, even if it’s miniature. A utopia for us to take back what is also ours.”

Ortiz is making the terrariums for everyone, even people who struggle to take care of plants.

Covid quarantining has forced so many people to think they make perfect plant parents. Yet, taking care of plants is something that doesn’t com naturally. Ortiz had to spend time trying to figure out what plants are the best for everyone.

“Part of my challenge in creating these terrariums has been figuring out what kind of plants people can keep alive. They all have different requirements so getting plants should always depend on your space and lighting,” Ortiz says. “I come from the generation of YouTube so I always say do research, it’s part of the fun. The biggest thing about having plants that people don’t realize is that you just have to pay attention to them, often. But again it depends, some plants are indestructible.”

Ortiz is happy to be able to create this art and hopes to make them more accessible.

“If you want to support me and my art work you can contact me via Instagram about commissions,” Ortiz says. “Shipping these pieces is not easy or ideal so I appreciate everyone’s patience as I learn and evolve. My goal is to work on larger installations and I’ll be putting out DIY kits in the near future.”

READ: If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

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