Entertainment

Here Are The Internet’s 20 Best Reactions To #BRAMEX And Mexico’s Defeat

ICYMI, FIFA’s World Cup is going down in the heart of Russia, and it’s going down. For the seventh consecutive time, Mexico has failed to advance past the round of 16. Mexico started strong, beating Germany, the defending champions, 1-0, but people are starting to wonder if a curse has taken hold over the team.

Mostly, the Internet is vexed as eff over Brazil’s star player, Neymar, and the resulting memes are life-giving. Behold, the best reactions from stans around the world.

1. This dad and his swift allegiance shift:

CREDIT: @clarissa_beth / Twitter

This 17 second video has been viewed 170,000 times by internet users. He literally just walks outside, takes down the Mexican flag, and immediately puts up the Brazilian. 😂

2. Enter: the Neymar Memes

CREDIT: @Tunnyking / Twitter

Mexico’s coach, Juan Carlos Osorio, won’t mention Brazil’s Neymar by name, but did comment on what he believes to be an outrageous amount of playacting in the second half.

“I think this is a very negative example for the world and the world of football and all the children following this game.”

3. Mexican fans immediately took to Photoshop:

CREDIT: @Tunnyking / Twitter

We are a culture rich in creative arts, including digital media, and we’re here for it, especially watching Neymar take his sweet time getting back to his feet every time he hit the ground.

4. By far, the best PS job is of Neymar in a baby chair. 🤣

CREDIT: @Tunnyking / Twitter

At one point, Mexican midfielder Miguel Layun approached Neymar to grab the ball and pressed his cleat onto Neymar’s ankle. Neymar immediately started rocking in a fetal position and started writhing on his back.

5. Brazilians are fiercely defending Neymar’s reaction.

CREDIT: @robinjagal / Twitter

The game had to be paused for several minutes while he was examined, leaving Mexicans (y casi todo) pretty frustrated. Brazilians have come out in full support of Neymar, tweeting out photos of Layun’s foot on Neymar’s ankle.

6. Oh, and Mexico fans are not backing down.

CREDIT: @DynamicSRK / Twitter

Even though Brazil won, Mexico stans continue to mock the Brazilians, tweeting out GIFS of people rolling down a hill as a representation of how Brazilians must be celebrating the win–with lots of drama.

7. Fans are even getting up in Neymar’s Twitter account.

CREDIT: @xfeelinggood / Twitter

Neymar’s first tweet after the victory was, “God bless us and protect us” alongside a picture of himself. Ensue the all caps, Mexicanas enojadas, demands: “And are you going to stop with the drama or when?”

8. They even started applauding Neymar’s performance on the field as only Mexico fans can.

CREDIT: @llopes_danilo / Twitter

I’m sorry, but anything with Leonardo DiCaprio from “The Wolf of Wall Street” is always immediately funny. Que payaso.

9. The Oscars just keep coming.

CREDIT: @jessleal7 / Twitter

Just imagine how the Internet would break if Neymar did win an Oscar after all. Someone send us tape of Neymar practicing when he thinks nobody is watching. I’d like to see how quickly he gets up then.

10. Truly, Mexico fans are talented.

CREDIT: @FerReenteria / Twitter

Although, they argue that the talent is all Neymar, but not for his footwork. Please note, that these are fans that are literally tweeting these photos @neymarjr. 🤭

11. … and don’t have time to spare for the theatrics.

CREDIT: @geesmariana / Twitter

Latinos are at least 40 minutes late to every engagement, but you can watch the beads of sweat drip down Papa’s red face for those grueling 4 minutes. It was a stressful time, OK?

12. The Internet even compared Neymar to mazapán! 🌹

CREDIT: @dfalvarez77 / Twitter

Get it? Because he’s so fragile? Go see for yourself all the Simpsons videos of Neymar high-fiving a teammate and immediately dropping to the ground like a turtle stuck on his back.

13. Every action figure of Neymar should come with a “fragíl” label.

CREDIT: @Jakkobo84 / Twitter
Recall all the figurines on the shelves, folks, because it’s missing a major part of Neymar’s character. Girls, raise your hand if you wish you could attach this label to the male ego in your life:

 🙋🏼🙋🏽🙋🏾🙋🏿

14. Finally, the Internet came up with a solution for Neymar:

CREDIT: @adrianamdhz65 / Twitter

We are just so helpful sometimes, tú sabes? I just can’t wait for the rest of the World Cup to see how Neymar adjusts his “performance.”

15. Brazil fans could be pointing this out, but Mexico didn’t want to waste an evil laugh:

CREDIT: @milanspeach / Twitter

For all the flack that Neymar is getting for the over the top reactions, the truth is that Mexico’s Layún really did step on his ankle. Oh and earlier in the match, he got so impatient with the time it was taking for Neymar to stand up on his own that he literally pulled Neymar up off the ground.

You know, to be helpful. 😇

16. Neymar’s fans, however, are setting the record straight.

CREDIT: @analuazvd / Twitter

As it turns out, Neymar had surgery on that ankle just two months before. But like, that’s soccer, right?

17. Mexico fans stand by goalie Guillermo Ochoa.

CREDIT: @lizardkat18 / Twitter

While, yes, two goals were made against Mexico, Ochoa made eight saves and even shut down a tight play from Neymar. ESPN ranked him as the best playing member of the Mexican team.

18. While Brazilians are mostly celebrating offline, they’re still gloating online.

CREDIT: @legallyliving / Twitter

Anyone out there speak Portuguese? We know this is something about big pitos but comment below if you can tell us what the stans are saying!

19. OK, Brazil, we see you:

CREDIT: @dara_dovale / Twitter

And TBH, even if your favorite team didn’t make it, I’m here to support pretty much any Latino country coming out on top. So pull out your Brazilian fan and switch flags ASAP.

20. Because Mexicanos will always find a reason to party and be happy. 😚🇲🇽

CREDIT: @curiousflow / Twitter

There’s always next year, right?! Imaginemos cosas chingonas en 2022, baby!


Show us how you are celebrating the World Cup by posting photos and videos using #WorldCup2018 and #ShowUsYourColors.

A 25-Year-Old Woman Was Murdered And Skinned, Then Mexican Newspapers Published Photos Of Her Body

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A 25-Year-Old Woman Was Murdered And Skinned, Then Mexican Newspapers Published Photos Of Her Body

SkyNews/ Twitter

In Mexico, the recent brutal mutilation and slaying of a 25-year-old woman are spurning conversations about the country’s efforts to prevent femicide and laws that protect victims from the media.

On Sunday, Mexican authorities revealed that they had discovered the body of Ingrid Escamilla.

According to reports, Escamilla was found lifeless with her body skinned and many of her organs missing. At the scene, a 46-year-old man was also discovered alive. His body was covered in bloodstains and he was arrested.

As of this story wasn’t troubling enough, local tabloids and websites managed to bring more tragedy to the victim and her family by splashing leaked graphic photos and videos of the victim’s body. In a terribly crafted headline, one paper by the name of Pasala printed the photos on its front page with the headline “It was Cupid’s fault.” The headline is a reference to the fact that the man found at the scene was Escamilla’s husband.

According to leaked video footage from the arrest scene, Escamilla’s husband admitted to stabbing his wife after a heated argument in which she threatened to kill him. He then claimed to have skinned her body to eliminate evidence.

Mexic City’s mayor, Claudia Sheinbaum, revealed that prosecutors will demand the maximum sentence against the alleged perpetrator.

“Femicide is an absolutely condemnable crime. It is appalling when hatred reaches extremes like in the case of Ingrid Escamilla,” Sheinbaum wrote in a tweet according to CNN. According to reports, Mexico broke records in 2018 when its homicide record reached over 33,000 people that year.

The publication of Escamilla’s mutilated body has sparked discussions regarding the way in which reports about violence against women are handled.

Women’s rights organizations have lambasted the papers that originally published photos of Escamilla’s body and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador also expressed criticism of the media’s response to the brutal slaying.

In a press conference on Thursday, President López Obrador expressed his determination to find and punish anyone responsible for the image leaks. “This is a crime, that needs to be punished, whoever it is,” he stated.

Conservationists At Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve Are Being Murdered And Investigators Aren’t Sure Why

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Conservationists At Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve Are Being Murdered And Investigators Aren’t Sure Why

Alan Ortega / Getty

Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve is one of the world’s most famous wildlife hotspots. Hundreds of thousands come each year to view the annual migration of millions of beautiful butterflies that call Mexico’s Michoacan state home during the winter.

However, this iconic and majestic habitat for one of the world’s most endangered animals is now the backdrop for a dramatic murder mystery that is unfolding in international headlines. Two conservationists have been discovered dead just days apart and investigators still aren’t sure why.

A second victim has been pronounced killed by authorities in Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly reserve.

Credit: Alan Ortega / Getty

One of the world’s most beautiful wildlife spots is now the backdrop for a dramatic double murder after two nature activists are discovered dead at Mexico’s El Rosario monarch butterfly sanctuary.

The deaths of Homero Gomez Gonzalez, manager of the butterfly reserve, and Raul Hernandez Romero, a tour guide at the sanctuary, have sent shockwaves across the world of wildlife conservation.

Hernandez Romero’s body was discovered on Saturday near the highest point of the mountainous sanctuary, which sits 9,000 feet above sea level in the state of Michoacan, about 130 miles west of Mexico City, according to a statement from the Michoacan state prosecutor’s office. Hernandez Romero’s family reported him missing on Friday, officials said.

The new victim was found just days after the first victim’s body was found after being missing for 16 days.

Credit: Alan Ortega / Getty

Authorities discovered his body about three days after the Hernandez Romero’s body was found in a pond near the Central Mexico town of El Soldado, prosecutors said.

An autopsy performed in the presence of State Human Rights Commission representatives determined Gomez Gonzalez died from “mechanical asphyxiation” after suffering head trauma and being submerged in water.

Gomez Gonzalez, whose family reported him missing two weeks ago, was one of the region’s most prominent conservation activists and a vocal defender of the monarch butterflies. He had launched a campaign against illegal logging that threatens the butterflies nesting grounds.

Although petty crime and theft is common in these parts of Mexico, authorities don’t believe this to be the case in Gonzalez’s death. He was found with about $9,000 pesos (or about $500 USD) on him when his body was discovered.

Mexico’s Monarch butterfly preserve is a UNESCO Biosphere reserve that draws hundreds of thousands of tourists each year.

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Each winter, millions of monarch butterflies make their home at the El Rosario reserve in Mexico — one of the best places in the world to see them. Local guides lead tourists up the mountainside on foot and horseback to where the monarchs cluster in fir and pine trees. Their bright orange wings flit amid the mild weather of Michoacán, and signs ask for silence as visitors enter the nesting areas.

The El Rosario sanctuary is part of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, which was enshrined as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008, calling the overwintering concentration of butterflies there “a superlative natural phenomenon.” It noted that more than half of overwintering colonies of the monarch butterfly’s eastern population are found in these specific areas of Mexico.

But the same forests that draw butterflies to migrate thousands of miles each winter are under threat from illegal logging and clandestine avocado farms.

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Officials in the state of Michoacán said they were unsure if the two deaths were linked – or related to the men’s work in the butterfly reserve. The state has seen a rising tide of violence in recent years, and the region around the monarch butterfly reserve has been rife with illegal logging, despite a ban imposed to protect the monarchs, which winter in the pine- and fir-covered hills.

Some illegal clearcutting is also carried out to allow for the planting of avocado orchards – one of Mexico’s most lucrative crops and an important part of Michoacán’s economy.

The deaths again called attention to the disturbing trend in Mexico of environmental defenders being killed as they come into conflict with developers or local crime groups, who often have political and police protection.