Things That Matter

HBO’s ‘Los Espookys’ Is The Spanish-Language And Comedy-Horror Show That Will Have Your Head Spinning And Heart Full

The launch of HBO’s much-anticipated series “Los Espookys” is almost officially here. The half-hour comedy series, created by Ana Fabrega and SNL alumni Fred Armisen and Julio Torres, has been on our radar ever since first reports of the series being picked up by HBO came through last year. Fans of horror, comedy, and Latin American identity have been waiting with bated breath for the series that has been described as following a group of friends who make a business out of their love for horror by providing it to those who need it.

Finally, after a year of excitedly waiting, the series – which follows a group of friends who make a business out of their love for horror by providing it to those who need it – is here! The show premieres tonight, June 14th.

HBO’s “Los Espookys” is expected to be the show of the summer.

 The comedy, which has already piqued online enthusiasm, has been called “delightfully weird,” “charmingly spooky” and “ wonderfully peculiar” by critics.

Set in an unnamed Latin American country, similar to Mexico, the show tells the story of a group of four oddball friends who launch a horror-productions company together. Individually, they all juggle the typical Latino concerns including family obligations and financial issues.

The show has a small cast, but critics say collectively they are packed with might.

HBO

Brazilian actor Bernardo Velasco (of “Belaventura”) heads up the cast as Renaldo, the group’s leader who is also obsessed with gory makeup. There’s also Andrés (Julio Torres) who is the heir to a chocolate empire, and Ursula, a dental assistant played by Cassandra Ciangherotti. The show’s co-creator, Ana Fabrega, also stars in the show as Tati, a woman who holds a laundry list of odd jobs.

The bilingual six-episode series relies on Spanish subtitles and slang.

HBO

While the show has yet to make its premiere (don’t forget to tune in tonight!) it’s trailer is a huge indicator of the direction mainstream networks are taking when it comes to television: English-only isn’t a thing anymore.

Thanks to shows like “Jane the Virgin,” “One Day at a Time,” and “Vida” American television is changing. The groundbreaking series, all of which strongly feature Spanish subtitles and the various cultures that make up Latin American cultures have slowly but surely exposed U.S. television viewers to the various nuances of Latinidad. All of this, while also providing Latinos with a chance to experience the shows they grew up watching from their own cultural point of view. “Los Espookys,” with its zany tone and pre-premiere buzz proves it will be no different.

Watch the trailer below.

Los Espookys premieres this Friday June 14 on HBO.

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HBO’s ‘Allen v. Farrow’ Documentary Sparks Potential Lawsuit

Entertainment

HBO’s ‘Allen v. Farrow’ Documentary Sparks Potential Lawsuit

Updated Feb. 24, 2021.

Dylan Farrow’s name has been tightly linked to the story she has been telling since 1992.

For three decades her account of being molested by her adoptive father, director Woody Allen, while in her mother Mia Farrow’s attic in Connecticut and molested her when she was seven years old has not wavered. She first told the story at the time of the incident to therapists, then she told police, and years later in 2014, she wrote an oped to the New York Times and again in 2017 for the Los Angeles Times. In 2018 she spoke about the incident in a televised interview with CBS and now she’s telling the same story, which many have cast doubt on in a four-part documentary from HBO titled Allen v. Farrow.

Allen v. Farrow investigates the abuse allegations and subsequent custody battle that gravely affected Farrow’s career but has only recently begun to create problems for Allen.

The new documentary series aired its first episode which examined the ways in which Allen’s behavior toward Dylan struck family, friends, and even a psychiatrist as inappropriate. The episode details how Allen took up an obsessive interest in Dylan after her adoption.

“I was always in his clutches,” Dylan remembered in the first episode. “He was always hunting me.” Dylan goes onto recall instances in which Allen would “direct” her on how to suck his thumb and what to do with her “tongue.” At one point a family friend backs up this behavior saying she’d seen Dylan doing this one time while other family members and acquaintances said they’d also witnessed Allen’s oddly sexual treatment of Dylan.

Allen has always denied the allegations brought forth by Dylan and has largely gotten away from the stain of such claims to continue his career based on the “woman scorned” trope.

Allen has proven to be the exception to the #MeToo movement in Hollywood despite many who claim to support the efforts to end sexual abuse in the industry. Prominent actresses like Scarlett Johansson, Blake Lively, Kate Winslet, Cate Blanchett, and even Selena Gomez worked with Allen in the decades after he was accused of abuse. Gomez starred alongside Timothée Chalamet in Allen’s 2017 film A Rainy Day in New York, which was eventually shelved by the movie’s production company, Amazon Studios after Dylan reiterated her claims in the 2017 op-ed.

Since the 90s, Allen has maintained that Farrow, his former partner of 12 years, conducted a smear campaign against him after she discovered his affair with her 21-year-old adopted daughter, Soon-Yi Previn.

At the time of their tumultuous divorce, which came as a result of the affair, Allen claimed that Dylan had been coached by Farrow. In response to the documentary, Allen denied interview requests for the documentary and described it after the fact as a “hatchet job riddled with falsehoods” and a “shoddy hit piece.”

As a result, Allen v. Farrow v. Skyhorse v. HBO might be up next. 

Skyhorse Publishing, the publisher behind Allen’s latest book, “Apropos of Nothing,” has threatened to sue the makers of the new docuseries for sampling excerpts from the famous director’s audiobook. 

“Neither the producers nor HBO ever approached Skyhorse to request permission to use excerpts from the audiobook,” Tony Lyons, president of Skyhorse said in a statement to the Los Angeles Times. “[W]e believe that its unauthorized use of the audiobook is clear, willful infringement under existing legal precedent . . . We will take the legal action we deem necessary to redress our and Woody Allen’s rights in his intellectual property,” the statement went on. 

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Former Student Accused Of Raping Daisy Coleman Speaks For The First Time Since The Tragic Suicides Of Her And Her Mother

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Former Student Accused Of Raping Daisy Coleman Speaks For The First Time Since The Tragic Suicides Of Her And Her Mother

Updated December 15, 2020.

This story is about suicide. If you or someone you know is in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME to 741741, or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for further help.

In 2016, Netflix debuted the heartwrenching documentary Audrie & Daisy a film that examined the tragic experiences of two high school students. Audrie Pott and Daisy Coleman were two teens at the time of their sexual assaults. Both women were subjected to cyberbullying and abuse after their assaults and forced to heal with little support. But soon after her assault, Audrie Pott was driven to suicide by hanging.

The film showed that Coleman also struggled with suicide ideation after the assault.

Four years after the film’s debut, Coleman (who had become a sexual assault victim advocate) died by suicide.

In a post to her Facebook page in August, Coleman’s mother, Melinda, shared the news: “My daughter Catherine Daisy Coleman committed suicide tonight,” Melinda Coleman wrote. “If you saw crazy messages and posts it was because I called the police to check on her. She was my best friend and amazing daughter. I think she had to make it seem like I could live without her. I can’t. I wish I could have taken the pain from her! She never recovered from what those boys did to her and it’s just not fair. My baby girl is gone.”

Matthew Barnett, 26, who was accused of raping Daisy at a party in 2012 served only four months in jail for dumping Coleman – then 14 – on her mother’s porch in freezing temperatures.

According to DailyMail, Barnett has had the gross fortune of moving on from the ordeal. He has a new girlfriend and a $55,000-a-year job as a project manager for an industrial roofing firm called Delta Innovative Services.

Barnett has never spoken to media outlets about Daisy’s rape allegations or what happened at the party years ago. But after Daily Mail found him living in a Kansas City suburb last week he broke his silence. According to Daily Mail, after being asked about how he felt about the suicides of Coleman and her mother Barnett replied “I don’t really have any comment. It’s just very sad.”

“Barnett said that although he is ‘good’, he has found the experience of being accused of rape difficulty,” according to DailyMail.com and he replied “‘I still struggle with it but I’m okay.'”

In early December Melinda Coleman also died by suicide, according to an organization her daughter co-founded.

According to reports, the heartbroken mother posted about feeling defeated in the weeks before her suicide and after her daughter’s death.

“Albany wins. I’m dead,” Coleman wrote on Facebook on Nov. 18. The comment seemingly referred to the Missouri city that the Coleman family moved to after Daisy endured bullying for coming forward with her rape allegations.

Later on December 5, Melinda Coleman further spoke of her daughter’s suicide writing “4 mos ago today my baby girl left this world with a broken heart and spirit. Out of hope and full of despair. She took all her pain and worked to help others. Many used her and stilll are stealing her pictures and quotes simply for their own gain. The narssacists and users that have nothing to say so they steal her. The line became very blurred on some “friends”, others truly loved her. More than she could see in that terrrible moment. All she could see was the continued harrassment and cruelty and the damage sustained to her poor little body. I’d like to challenge everyone to be kind and lift up others in pain, especially sexual assault survivors and those hopeless in this holiday season. Send out light and love and protect each other and I will protect and pray for anyone who needs it. Let’s make this a Daisy Day filled with light, hope and love. Let’s work toward a justice system that stops failing the victims of rape. Let’s fill today with Daisys light and  love!”

Daisy Coleman co-founded, SafeBAE (a survivor-founded and student-led national organization working to combat sexual assault among middle and high school students) announced Melinda Coleman’s death on its Instagram page.

“We are in shock and disbelief to share with our SafeBAE family, that we lost Melinda Coleman to suicide,” the SafeBAE Instagram post wrote and went on to explain that Melinda lost her husband father in a car accident when Daisy was a child, her son, Tristan from a car accident in Kansas in 2018.

At the time of her assault, Coleman was 14 years old. She was sexually assaulted by a high schooler named Matthew Barnett and was dumped outside of her home wearing only a T-shirt in the dead of winter. The documentary film said Coleman had been left behind in sub-freezing temperatures and that her hair had stuck to the ground.

Barnett was eventually subjected to a felony sexual assault charge for what he did to Coleman but the charge was later dropped.

After, Coleman became a target for bullying.

Filmmakers followed Coleman for two years watching the ways in which Coleman and members of her family were subjected to the trauma of her assault.

“I definitely feel like people have certain views and perceptions about me and about cases like this because they’re uneducated,” then-19-year-old Coleman told People in a 2017 interview. “That’s exactly why I’m going out and trying to educate people on what’s going on in our society.”

Speaking about her experience, Coleman said that she didn’t hold any animosity against her attacker. “I honestly don’t have any vindictive feelings toward him,” Coleman told People. “I feel like all of that negativity that he put onto me was passed down to him at one point, so I felt the need to stop that kind of transaction of negativity and hate… I went through a lot of years of self-loathing and asking myself, Why me? So much ‘woe is me’… I just decided one day that I was done being negative about it. I needed to forgive myself for what happened.”

In 2017, Coleman worked to help others from being subjected to sexual violence for the national campaign SafeBAE — Safe Before Anyone Else.

If you or someone you know might be considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Or text “STRENGTH” to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741.

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