Entertainment

These HBO Movies And Shows Will Keep You Entertained During Your Weekend Binge Watching Sessions

In the last few years, Latinos have been blowing up the entertainment industry. Mexican directors have won four of the last five Oscars in the Best Director category. Netflix has produced one after the other of Spanish-language television series and the hit reboot of “One Day at a Time.” We’re seeing Latinos on screen as detectives, veterans, mothers, abuelitas, and even in animation.

HBO is one of those production companies that sees Latinos as an audience to celebrate, and we’re loving how easy they’re making it for us to find our people with our own genre. We rounded up HBO’s featured list along with all the binge-worthy need-to-knows.

“Psi”

HBO

This show is eclectic as anything, with a protagonist named Carlo Antonini, who is a psychiatrist/psychologist/psychoanalyst. Antonini dabbles in the most unusual cases possible, some of which put his family in danger. With a man whose normal day to day includes all the abnormal, it’s no surprise that his threshold in his personal life isn’t much different.

Watch Antonini juggle dating a street performer, a young Goth who practices vampirism, and so, so much more.

“Cappadocia: Un Lugar Sin Perdón”

HBO

Filmed in Mexico, “Capadocia” first ran in 2008 for three seasons but still remains a solid telenovela thriller. This is more than a story about women in a Mexico City industrial complex. It’s about attorney Teresa Lagos who fights for their rights as she learns that officials are experimenting on the women.

Think of it as the Mexican, novela version of “Orange is the New Black.”

“El Negocio”

HBO

One of the longest standing series on HBO Latino, “El Negocio” stars three, independent women in the sex working industry who show the world that they are in fact, savvy business women who create a brand for themselves. Using marketing, business strategy and their keen intellects, they climb to the top of the business.

“Alice”

HBO

You don’t hear the name Alice too often for Latinos, but it works for esa mujer who essentially falls down an Alice in Wonderland-esque rabbit hole. It all happens when she has to go to Sao Paulo for her father’s funeral. With opportunities abundant, Alice starts a brand new life, with a new world of friends and experiences.

“Destino Deporte”

HBO

This reads like a Spanish “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown” meets sports. You can find yourself in Romanza Gym, the elite boxing gym of Mexico, meet Argentina’s Narvaez boxing family even and meet Mexican parachuter Tono Montano, a blind surfer who uses his other senses to feel the waves.

“Dios Inc.”

HBO

If you couldn’t get enough of “Wild, Wild Country” and all things culty, get yourself some “Dios Inc.” We start by meeting Dr. Salvador Pereyra who returns to Mexico after spending 10 years in the Middle East studying religions. Once his discovery of the tomb of Marduk becomes public knowledge, a sect plagiarizes his work and starts a cult.

Salvador teams up with a young (y tan cute) Sci-Fi writer to stop the cult before something sinister happens.

“Dr. Reggaeton”

HBO

HBO’s biggest Latino hit yet, “Dr. Reggaeton” is a three part series hosted by comedian Frankie Quinones. Each episode features a special guest, like Farruko, Bad Bunny & Jacob Forever. Dr. Reggaeton gets boricua af once he starts reading letters from fans asking for love advice from the doc and his guests.

“Chumel con Chumel Torres”

HBO

He’s the Mexican John Oliver with the insight and humor that only a Latino can bring to the current situation in the United States. He doesn’t stop there though. Chumel reports on all things politics and opinion from the U.S. to Latin America. Prepare for some dark humor, very, very dark.

“El Hipnotizador”

HBO

Led by Argentinian and Emmy-nominated Leonardo Sbaraglia, who plays hypnotist Natalio Arenas, this series is based on an Argentinian cult comic book of the same name. Arenas is barely functioning with a severe case of insomnia when he lands a stage show gig.

Wait until he comes face to face with his professional/personal enemy who hypnotized him into the insomnia in the first place.

“El Jardín de Bronce”

HBO

Set in Buenos Aires, this tells the story of how a young couple’s otherwise normal life was completely turned upside down when their four-year-old daughter vanishes on the metro.

The police have no motives, clues, or witnesses, so it’s up to Fabian and Lila to find their child. A whole decade passes, and the most nauseating plot twists will rivet you for eight, scintillating episodes.

“Epitafios”

HBO

OK, so you finished “Shades of Blue” and you need more detective work on your screen. Try this 2014 series that seems like an alternate ending to “Shades of Blue,” if Harlee never “got healed.”

All you need to know is that a former cop’s shady past with his ex-lover and psychiatrist come to a head when they are forced to team up and find a serial killer who could end it all for them.

“Magnifica ’70”

HBO

This show is everything just for the fashion inspo. Set in Sao Paulo in the 1970s, our eyes are set on a federal film censor, Vicente, who seems to be obsessed with a risque movie, “The Hot Student.” Right off the bat, he censors the movie, but his attraction to the lead actress takes him out of his comfort zone and straight into the city’s red-light district.

“Fantasmagorias”

HBO

Latinos know horror like nobody else, because our moms and abuelitas had the most horrifying cautionary tales you could ever imagine. Find out which ones were just your mami with her big talk and which ones are legendary across Latin America (i.e. Chupacabra, La Sayona, y La Ouija).

This animated series brings those tales that were passed down generation to generation to this generation’s format: 2-D computer animated life. Check out this collection of short films for those work breaks when you’re craving horror, but only have a few minutes.

“Playing for Change”

HBO

This series of short sets (~8 min) interview artists from all over Latin America to create a series of music videos. For one episode, HBO Latino gathered over 70 Cuban artists across the world and asked them to sing “Guantanamera,” and then fused them all together for the iconic song, sung by la gente.

“Heroes Cotidianos”

HBO

OK, so you’re looking for a heartwarmer? This show plays like “Humans of New York,” pero Latinos of the World. All of the people are just regular people doing incredible things to pull people up from poverty, legal detention and more.

Watch women offer relief to immigrants, retired teachers teach astronomy on a school bus transformed astronomical observatory, and so much more. You kind of have to see it to believe it.

“La Vida Secreta de las Parejas”

HBO

We’ve got a sexologist in the house. Sofia Prado runs a center for alternative couples therapy and prides herself on changing couples’ lives, but she has her own drama to untangle. She casually gets caught up in a major corruption investigation, while also holding onto a big secret – her recurring hallucinations.

Set in Sao Paulo, this show won’t fail to entertain you.

“Hijos del Carnaval”

HBO

Can you guess this is based in Rio de Janeiro? We follow the story of Anesio Gebara, a samba school-owning, illegal lottery running and overall intimidating man and his complicated relationships with his sons. By the way, those sons are all in on his slot machine electronic card smuggling business, and worse.

“Profugos”

HBO

You were waiting for a drug lord to enter this list weren’t you? The season opens up with a major drug-trafficking operation bust at the border of Bolivia and Chile. We then follow the story of four fugitive men as they try to pull themselves out of the hole they’re buried in.

“Sr. Avila”

HBO

At first glance, this show doesn’t seem that exciting. Sr. Avila is a middle-class life insurance salesman, father and husband. Claro lives a double life as a hit man. When his business savvy seeps into his second life and he begins to head an organization of contract assassins. His double lives unwittingly begin to merge into one, and the results are, at the very least, entertaining.

“Mujer de Fases”

HBO

Released in 2012, we get to watch 30-something, recently divorced real estate agent Grace begin a new life. You’d think this is a rom-com, but it’s much more comedic than it is romantic as Grace endures a parade of ridiculous love interests with the support of her overbearing mami, Hilda, and her bestie, Selma.

Whatever you’ll be bingeing tonight, we’re happy HBO is helping to reduce the worst part of streaming television: the selection process. Studies show that people spend an average of 45 minutes searching for something to watch before they click play. De nada.


READ: A Trans Latina Is Having Her Quinceanera Aired By HBO As A Docu-Series Exploring The Time Honored Tradition

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‘For Rosa’ Unravels The Madrigal Ten’s Fight For Reproductive Justice After Forced Sterilizations In California

Entertainment

‘For Rosa’ Unravels The Madrigal Ten’s Fight For Reproductive Justice After Forced Sterilizations In California

It’s 1970. Groans of discomfort permeate a Los Angeles County Hospital hallway as a Mexican-American woman is in labor. This is going to be her first child.

Little does she know that it’ll also be her last.

Courtesy of Kathryn Boyd-Batstone.

“This is an example of erasure,” director Kathryn Boyd-Batstone told mitú.

For Rosa, details a harrowing reality for many women of color in 1970s California. Inspired by the 1978 Madrigal v. Quilligan case, the story follows Eva, a mother faced with the pivotal decision to join the Madrigal Ten after discovering she was unknowingly sterilized.

Wanting to highlight each individual experience, Boyd-Batstone described her heroine as “a fictional composite character” inspired by multiple plaintiffs from the Madrigal Ten.

At first glance, Eva’s story prominently resembles the experience of plaintiff Melvina Hernández.

Hernández, at 23, signed a document that allegedly consented to an emergency C-section. Fearmongering by doctors and nurses highlighted a perceieved risk of mortality, pressuring her to sign a document she couldn’t read.

Four years later, she was informed that she had actually signed for a tubal ligation.

The history of eugenics is an ugly one, acting as a form of silent genocide.

In Eva’s case, medical professionals take advantage of her. Doctors and nurses took advantage of her language barrier and the pain of child labor.

The story, while historical, is relevant in the current context of the Trump era’s immigration policies.

Last year, an ICE nurse whistleblower reported the nonconsensual mass hysterectomies of migrant women detained at the border.

In the U.S. and Canada, Indigenous women have continuously been sterilized despite pro-sterilization policies ending in the 1970s.

“Although the court case happened over fifty years ago, we are still in a time where reproductive rights are not respected,” Boyd-Batstone said. “This is not an issue of the past, and so the fight continues.”

California’s eugenics laws disproportionately targeted Latinas.

California was one of the leading states in eugenics-informed practices.

After passing a law in 1909 that allowed medical practitioners to sterilize patients, the motives of cultural erasure became clear.

Hiding behind “good medicine” were racist and xenophobic incentives aimed to eliminate potential “welfare” cases.

Under this discriminatory pretense, Latinas were 59 percent more likely to be forcibly sterilized.

The United States has an extensive history of nonconsensual medical experimentation on Black and Brown communities.

Studies like the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male,” which lasted over 40 years, in part, shaped the mistrust between the Black community and the medical industry.

A mistrust that remains prevalent in the 21st century.

The Madrigal Ten is a testament to the fight for reproductive rights and women of colors’ autonomy.

In 1975, Dolores Madrigal alongside nine other women filed a class-action lawsuit against L.A. County-USC Medical Center for the nonconsensual tubal ligations that occurred during child labor.

A complicated ordeal that received little funding, 26-year-old Chicana Civil Rights attorney Antonia Hernández impressively took on the case. Boyd-Batstone who read the court documents said, “it became obvious that at the time the hospital did not have adequate steps in place to make sure their patients could give informed consent.”

Dr. Karen Benker, the only physician to testify against the hospital, told the New York Times in 2016 that “voluntary informed consent” didn’t exist in the early 70s.

That is until after the National Research Act of 1974 following public outcry from the Tuskegee study.

Following Roe v. Wade, the Madrigal Ten case sought to end the forced sterilizations of women of color, define informed consent and provide consent forms in Spanish at a reading level individuals could understand.

In 2016 PBS released a documentary on the case called “No Más Bebes,” which greatly inspired Boyd-Batstone to create For Rosa.

“The main feeling that stuck with me after watching the documentary was how much strength it must have taken these women to face someone who tried to take their identity and demand accountability,” she said.

Validating women of color’s experiences was essential for Boyd-Batstone. While the film mirrors the malpractices of the medical industry, brought upon by systematic racism and bias, she also hopes that women who have felt “diminished or uneasy around doctors” find the courage to speak out.

For Rosa, sheds light on traditional themes of womanhood and Chicana feminism.

“Stop Forced Sterilization” poster by Rachael Romero, 1977. // Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Simultaneously, the lawsuit took place during the rise in Chicana activism.

As tensions between mainstream white feminism and women of color peaked; Chicana activists put legislative reform and reproductive justice at the forefront. Furthermore, they brought awareness to discrimination as it intersects race, class, gender, and immigration.

Though on the sidelines, the case also harbored on the cultural question of defining femininity.

Worried for the state of her marriage, the correspondence of fertility with femininity felt dense. Heavily ingrained in machismo culture; the pain and frustration of no longer being able to conceive are palpable.

But the strength and courage to speak out defies all odds.

“As women, especially Latina women, I don’t think many stories show us how to do this,” Boyd-Batstone said. “So it was important to me to, one, honor the Madrigal Ten’s bravery but [to also] show young girls what it looks like to stand up and fight for your rights.” 

Though it has been nearly 50 years since the Madrigal Ten case, the fight for women’s autonomy and reproductive rights is ongoing.

Courtesy of Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

On June 7, 1978, the U.S. District Court ruled in favor of the USC Medical Center. Judge Jesse Curtis stated that miscommunication and language barriers resulted in unwanted sterilizations.

Nonetheless, the lawsuit’s impact was potent. The California Department of Health revised its sterilization guidelines to include a 72-hour waiting period and issued a booklet on sterilization in Spanish.

In 1979, California abolished its sterilization law after 70 years.

More than 20,000 people of various races and ethnicities were sterilized during this time.

For Rosa ends with archival footage of Dolores Madrigal and Antonia Hernández announcing the lawsuit. Nevertheless, its timely release is indicative of the continual demands for justice today.

Now more than ever we must remember the narratives of the Madrigal Ten, and other Black and Brown activists who continue to pave the way for change.

“My hope is that For Rosa humanizes the women so that whatever culture or race or gender you are, you can empathize with the women as human beings,” Boyd-Batstone said.

“My hope is that every person who watches understands that these Latina women are deserving of respect.” 

Para Rosa (For Rosa) is available to stream on HBO Max.

READ: Joe Biden Says ‘Healthcare is Not a Privilege, It’s a Right,’ Donald Trump and the GOP Disagree

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Here’s What We Know So Far About The ‘Rebelde’ Reboot Coming To Netflix

Entertainment

Here’s What We Know So Far About The ‘Rebelde’ Reboot Coming To Netflix

Nostalgia has a way of taking us right back to who we were when we saw and heard some of our favorite things. “Rebelde” is definitely one of the top nostalgic moments in most Latino childhoods. Well, get ready because Netflix is bringing “Rebelde” back so you can dive back into the stories that will forever hold a special place in your heart.

“Rebelde” is coming back and this is definitely not a drill.

After years of being off the air, the historic and iconic show “Rebelde” is back and people cannot wait. The original cast has been good at keeping our love for them alive as they toured and created music. Most recently, RBD, the surviving band of original Rebelde members, dropped a new single to make the pandemic a little more tolerable.

We already know who is reprising their role in the reboot.

Celina Ferrer, played by Estefanía Villarreal, is coming back as the principal of the school. The official announcement letter was signed by the Elite Way School alumna.

“EWS is renowned for the excellence of its illustrious student body, young people ready to dazzle the world. In these halls, we have shaped icons who have gone on to entertain millions with their talent, and our classrooms have turned students into stars, ready for the big stage,” reads the letter. “Today, our Board of Directors is proud to present the next generation of young people who will become part of our prestigious institution in the upcoming 2022 school year. We welcome our future students Azul Guatia, Sergio Mayer Mori, Andrea Chaparro, Jeronimo Cantillo, Franco Masini, Lixeth Selene, Alejandro Puente, and Giovanna Grigio, who have been selected from an impressive list of applicants. The new students will start wearing the EWS uniform during orientation, which will start on March 1 of this year, thus preparing themselves for the upcoming 2022 school year at this institution, always committed to educating the leaders of tomorrow.”

Here’s a quick look at the new class.

Azul Guaita

Guaita is best known for her impressive TikTok account. She also starred in telenovelas ‘Mi marrido tiene familia” and “Soltero con hijas.” The 19-year-old Mexican actress has garnered more than 2 million followers on TikTok.

Sergio Mayer Mori

Mayer Mori is son of Mexican actor and producer Sergio Mayer and Uruguayan-born Mexican actress, model, producer and writer Bárbara Mori Ochoa. The young actor was in “Un padre no tan padre” in 2016.

Andrea Chaparro

Andrea is the daughter of famed Mexican actor Omar Chapparo. Hopefully the actress brings her unapologetic grunge vibes to the set in her role.

Jeronimo Cantillo

Cantillo is best known for his role in Verdad Oculta and Los Morales as well as his reggaeton music. The actor is bringing his award nominated acting chops and musical stylings to the highly anticipated Netflix reboot.

Franco Masini

Masini is one of the biggest names attached to the new “Rebelde” reboot. With several projects under his belt and more than 1 million Instagram followers, Masini is definitely bringing a large following to the Netflix show.

Lizeth Selene

Selene has made a name for herself as a musician and model. It is pretty impressive that her first acting job is going to be as part of the newest Rebelde class.

Alejandro Puente

Puente is an actor, writer, and director with a lot of success in Mexico. He is best known for his role as Todd Anderson in the Mexican stage adaptation of “Dead Poets Society.” He also stars in “El Club,” a crime drama television show in Mexico.

Giovanna Grigio

Grigio comes to the Elite Way School with 6 million Instagram followers and a lot of experience. The Brazilian actress has starred in several television shows and movies and will definitely bring some strong talent to the show.

READ: RBD Is Back With A New Single And This Is Not A Drill

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