Entertainment

These 10 Latino Films Needs To Be On Your Binge List For After Thanksgiving Dinner

Get ready for lots of food, lots of family, and lots of home time because it’s Thanksgiving weekend. Whether you’re hosting a feast, traveling to see family and friends or just enjoying some time off from work, one of the biggest holidays of the year deserves good TV and movies to go along with the turkey and stuffing. Think of a Thanksgiving binge-watch as a side you can’t overcook.

1. Coco

this movie focuses on the need to honor one’s family and tugs at your heartstrings. Perfect to snuggle up on the couch and watch with a hot cup of chocolate abuelita and recalentado.

2. Bellas de Noche

Or ‘Queens of the night’ in English, follows the story of five of the most famous showgirls in Mexico during the 1970s and 1980s (a time were nightclubs, cabarets and theaters dominated nightlife) as they reminisce on their past glory and fame.

3. Latin History for Morons.

John Leguizamo dives into the deep and heartbreaking history of Latinos in the Americas and traces 3,000 years of Latin History with his signature style of humor.

4. Cristela Alonzo: Lower Classy

Comedienne Cristela Alonzo tackles Latino stereotypes, social norms and her mother’s tough-love parenting style. In her comedy special, Cristela reminds everyone why she is a boss babe, and one of the top Latinx comedians to watch.

5. Pachamama

his one is for the whole familia. The writers of the film Pachamama weaved a beautiful and timeless journey-to-hero story about a boy who goes on an adventure to achieve something greater than he is and showing that we could all believe in a little more magic.

6. Neruda

he movie introduces audiences to a flawed, opinionated Pablo Neruda (Luis Gnecco), the poet and senator who was forced into hiding in 1948 after the Chilean government swung from left to right. But it also includes a made-up figure, the ambitious investigator Óscar Peluchonneau (Bernal), to play the serious and rigid foil to Neruda’s flamboyant and creative personality.

7. Residente

This one’s perfect for the Calle 13 fans out there. Follow Residente, as he trots the globe learning more about the places he comes from and how his ancestors brought him to where he is today.

After having taken a DNA test, the 24-time Grammy Award-winning and Nobel Peace Summit Award recipient seeks to learn more about himself through the lens of others.

9. Aquarius

In this not-so-subtle jab at Brazil’s real estate boom, Clara (Sonia Braga), a longtime resident of a housing complex in Recife, Brazil, refuses to leave when developers come to take away her home. The businessmen may resort to cruel methods to try and push her out, but Clara is steadfast. As she begins to reminisce about her memory-filled years there, her fight to stay becomes a mission.

10. Our Last Tango

Once a renowned couple in the Buenos Aires tango scene, the dancers María Nieves Rego and Juan Carlos Copes split professionally after their marriage shattered. But after years apart, they reunite to reflect on their 50-year relationship for this Argentine documentary, which blends talking head interviews with stylish modern-dance and tango interpretations of Rego’s childhood and the couple’s relationship.

‘One Day At a Time’ Filming Without Audience Over Coronavirus

Entertainment

‘One Day At a Time’ Filming Without Audience Over Coronavirus

One Day At A Time / Netflix

Ay yay yay looks like One Day A Time has caught the fever.

Sí mi gente, your beloved “One Day A Time” series has caught onto the coronavirus scare. According to Deadline the comedy series from Pop TV has been audience-free since Tuesday.

In light of the coronavirus pandemic, the beloved primetime multi-camera sitcom has decided to forgo forego taping in front of live audiences.

Pop TV

According to a statement from ViacomCBS’ Entertainment & Youth Brands their “top priority is the safety of our guests and staff. All of our LA based shows including Comedy Central’s Lights Out With David Spade and Tosh.0 will film without an audience starting Monday, March 16th. There have been no developments at Lights Out or Tosh.0 to cause concern for audience members who have plans to attend tonight’s tapings. MTV’s Ridiculousness will also tape without an audience beginning today and Pop TV’s One Day at a Time has been doing so since Tuesday. These decisions have been made out of an abundance of caution and concern regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus.”

Earlier this year, when news that Netflix had canceled the critically acclaimed show “One Day at a Time” hit Twitter, many were feared the entire site would be burned down.

Pop TV

News that the beloved comedy-drama, which followed the life of a Cuban American family, had officially been canceled spurned various criticisms of Netflix and backlash from the show’s fanbase. Netflix users decried the decision accusing the site of giving POC viewers low priority and nearly no visibility through its shows. Some canceled their Netflix accounts altogether and even started hashtags to do the same. To say the least, fans were devastated.  

So when the TV channel PopTV announced that fans had convinced them enough to save the series and buy it for their own, Latino viewers were beyond elated. Here’s hoping fans of the series get a chance to attend live productions soon!

Korean Dark Comedy ‘Parasite’ Becomes The First Non-English Language Movie To Win The Oscar For Best Picture

Entertainment

Korean Dark Comedy ‘Parasite’ Becomes The First Non-English Language Movie To Win The Oscar For Best Picture

parasitemovie / Instagram

The Academy Awards last night brought many surprise wins and losses. “Parasite,” a Korean dark comedy about the class struggle in South Korea, swept with four major awards. The movie took home the Oscar for Best Director, Best International Film, Best Original Screenplay, and the most sought after Best Picture. The night was history-making as “Parasite” is the first non-English language movie to win Best Picture.

Director Bong Joon-ho made history last night with his film “Parasite.”

“Parasite” was competing for the award against “1917,” “Jojo Rabbit,” “The Irishman,” “Little Women,” “Marriage Story,” “Ford v Ferrari,” “Joker,” and “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.”

Director Bong Joon-ho made history with his film. “Parasite” is the first-ever non-English language film to win the award for Best Picture. There have only been 11 non-English movies nominated for Best Picture out of the 563 that have been nominated in the Academy’s history. The award is the only one where all Academy members are allowed to cast a vote for and is presented to the producers of the film. Last year’s winner was “Green Book.”

The unexpected and welcomed victory is an important moment in Oscar’s history and people are taking notice.

In a time when certain voices are being oppressed, the elevation of these kinds of stories and communities is important. Representation matters and film is one way we can show other cultures and participate in major cultural conversations.

Compared to the rest of the movies nominated for Best Picture, “Parasite” had the lowest production budget.

Credit: @NorbertElekes / Twitter

The film, which cost about $11 million to produce, became Bong Joon-ho’s first film to gross over $100 million worldwide. The movie earned $167.6 million worldwide with $35.5 million made in the U.S.

“I feel like a very opportune moment in history is happening right now,” producer Kwak Sin Ae said through a translator.

The historic moment has angered some people who wish the award went to an American film.

Credit: @jakeh91283 / Twitter

Earlier during the award season, Bong Joon-ho stated that the Best Picture award was a local award. The statement, which caught everyone’s attention, was an unintentional drag of the Academy while also painting an honest picture of the award’s history.

The U.S. is how to the largest Korean diaspora community in the world. Around 2.2 million people in the U.S. identify as being of Korean descent. The Korean community makes up about 0.7 percent of the U.S. population. South Koreans make up 99 percent of those with Korean heritage living in the U.S.

Yet, a larger chorus of voices are praising the film and celebrating the historic win.

Credit: @allouttacain / Twitter

What do you think about “Parasite” winning the Oscar for Best Picture?

READ: Awkwafina Became The First Asian-American Woman To Win A ‘Best Actress’ Award, But People Are Still Mad At The Golden Globes—Here’s Why