Entertainment

These 10 Latino Films Needs To Be On Your Binge List For After Thanksgiving Dinner

Get ready for lots of food, lots of family, and lots of home time because it’s Thanksgiving weekend. Whether you’re hosting a feast, traveling to see family and friends or just enjoying some time off from work, one of the biggest holidays of the year deserves good TV and movies to go along with the turkey and stuffing. Think of a Thanksgiving binge-watch as a side you can’t overcook.

1. Coco

this movie focuses on the need to honor one’s family and tugs at your heartstrings. Perfect to snuggle up on the couch and watch with a hot cup of chocolate abuelita and recalentado.

2. Bellas de Noche

Or ‘Queens of the night’ in English, follows the story of five of the most famous showgirls in Mexico during the 1970s and 1980s (a time were nightclubs, cabarets and theaters dominated nightlife) as they reminisce on their past glory and fame.

3. Latin History for Morons.

John Leguizamo dives into the deep and heartbreaking history of Latinos in the Americas and traces 3,000 years of Latin History with his signature style of humor.

4. Cristela Alonzo: Lower Classy

Comedienne Cristela Alonzo tackles Latino stereotypes, social norms and her mother’s tough-love parenting style. In her comedy special, Cristela reminds everyone why she is a boss babe, and one of the top Latinx comedians to watch.

5. Pachamama

his one is for the whole familia. The writers of the film Pachamama weaved a beautiful and timeless journey-to-hero story about a boy who goes on an adventure to achieve something greater than he is and showing that we could all believe in a little more magic.

6. Neruda

he movie introduces audiences to a flawed, opinionated Pablo Neruda (Luis Gnecco), the poet and senator who was forced into hiding in 1948 after the Chilean government swung from left to right. But it also includes a made-up figure, the ambitious investigator Óscar Peluchonneau (Bernal), to play the serious and rigid foil to Neruda’s flamboyant and creative personality.

7. Residente

This one’s perfect for the Calle 13 fans out there. Follow Residente, as he trots the globe learning more about the places he comes from and how his ancestors brought him to where he is today.

After having taken a DNA test, the 24-time Grammy Award-winning and Nobel Peace Summit Award recipient seeks to learn more about himself through the lens of others.

9. Aquarius

In this not-so-subtle jab at Brazil’s real estate boom, Clara (Sonia Braga), a longtime resident of a housing complex in Recife, Brazil, refuses to leave when developers come to take away her home. The businessmen may resort to cruel methods to try and push her out, but Clara is steadfast. As she begins to reminisce about her memory-filled years there, her fight to stay becomes a mission.

10. Our Last Tango

Once a renowned couple in the Buenos Aires tango scene, the dancers María Nieves Rego and Juan Carlos Copes split professionally after their marriage shattered. But after years apart, they reunite to reflect on their 50-year relationship for this Argentine documentary, which blends talking head interviews with stylish modern-dance and tango interpretations of Rego’s childhood and the couple’s relationship.

The Trailer For ‘The Last Days Of American Crime’ Is A Pulse-Pounding Thriller You Need

Entertainment

The Trailer For ‘The Last Days Of American Crime’ Is A Pulse-Pounding Thriller You Need

Netflix / YouTube

Édgar Ramírez is one of the most handsome men in Hollywood, tbh. It helps that he is good at what he does as well. The Venezuelan actor and former journalist is in a new movie from Netflix called “The Last Days of American Crime.”

Imagine the story of the last crime ever committed in the U.S.

Netflix’s “The Last Days of American Crime” is a visual retelling of the famous graphic novel. The story is one of crime, big government, and action rolled into one film. Édgar Ramírez plays criminal Graham Bricke and he is after that proverbial last score before committing a crime in the U.S. becomes impossible.

The criminals in the movie are fighting against the implementation of a device the hinders criminals motionless. The device emits a sound that freezes them in their place preventing them from committing any crimes. Bricke experiences the device when robbing a bank and his brother dies.

The rest of the story is one of pursuing the ultimate final heist and getting revenge. The movie will leave you on the edge of your seat while you watch the criminals do everything in their power to make sure their last score is the best and most historic.

“The Last Days of American Crime” is out June 5 on Netflix.

Netflix has been delivering some stellar content with Latino actors in the leads. The trailer for “The Last Days of American Crime” promises a crime thriller with all of the emotional ups and downs you can handle.

READ: Edgar Ramirez Shocked Jimmy Fallon When He Shared Details From The Set Of ‘The Assassination Of Gianni Versace’

From Churros To Buñuelos And Atole— 12 Latino Comfort Desserts To Get You Through This Weird Quarantine Season

Culture

From Churros To Buñuelos And Atole— 12 Latino Comfort Desserts To Get You Through This Weird Quarantine Season

josie_delights / guatemala / Instagram

Updated on May 13, 2020, originally published on November 20, 2019.

Sure, it’s summertime but there’s nothing wrong with tapping into the holiday season for some good o’l comfort food. Especially these days. Latinos don’t settle for just one dessert option, we have plenty to choose from and you best believe a few tías will bring different ones. From pastel de tres leches to churros and all the drinks that go with them, there are some wonderful treats in store. Yes, more often than not, a good cafecito will pair up perfectly with your postre, but how about a Mexican ponche? Or a Guatemalan Atol? We rounded up our fave cold-weather desserts for the summer that every Latino should whip up for quarantine!

1. Alfajores

Credit: nosjuntapaula / Instagram

These soft, delicate and buttery cookies are held together by the addicting caramel sauce, an elixir of the gods; dulce de leche. This option goes perfectly with a good old cafecito and chisme. That sobremesa is sure to get lit with all that sugar pumping up the tías and abuelitas. 

2. Arroz con leche

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A foolproof winter classic. Arroz con leche is the ultimate Latino comfort dessert any time of year tbh. Try it calientito with a good amount of cinnamon and raisins. Provecho!

3. Buñuelos —Colombianos and Mexicanos

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The Colombian iteration isn’t quite a sweet treat as it’s filled with cheese, but the addition of brown sugar, butter and tapioca make it a dessert in our book. As for the Mexican version, they’re usually made during the winter holidays. Mexican Buñuelos are made of fried dough, covered in cinnamon sugar and if you’re not about fried dough covered in cinnamon sugar, idk what to tell you, there’s something wrong going on.  

4. Chocoflan

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Also known in Mexico as ‘Impossible Cake’, this delicious mass of goodness combines two great things into one god-sent hybrid. If you love flan, but would also like to have a slice of chocolate cake, Latina moms everywhere say; “¿Por qué no los dos?” The rich dense chocolate, topped with creamy vanilla flan, drizzled with a thick layer of cajeta is, quite literally, what dessert dreams are made of. 

5. Churros

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There’s something so satisfying when biting into a warm, doughy, crunchy and sugary churro. You can find these delicious treats all over Latin America, and they’re particularly yummy when paired with a cup of hot chocolate! Extra points if you stuff them with cajeta or chocolate. 

6. Flan

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Almost every Latin American household will have its own version of flan. From Puerto Rico to Costa Rica and everywhere in between, Latinos love flan. The creamy vanilla-flavored concoction is basically irresistible. 

7. Natilla Colombiana

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This Colombian custard dessert is very traditional during Christmas, but we like to think that it’s also good at any time of the year. Natilla is a rich, custard-like dessert traditionally served alongside the deep-fried cheese buñuelos we told you about earlier. You’ll definitely have to forget about la dieta if you want to have this option. 

8. Suspiro de Limeña

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Its name literally translates to “Sigh of the lady from Lima.” This Peruvian dessert is definitely sigh-inducing. The creamy, caramel-like custard, topped with a Port flavored meringue is an extra sweet treat for this cold season. The dessert originated in the city of Lima, and it is said that it gained its name after a poet said it tasted soft and sweet, like the sigh of a woman.

9. Pastel de Tres leches 

Credit: tallerdenoemi / Instagrm

This quintessentially Latino cake is made with three types of milk: evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk and whole milk. This is definitely not for the lactose intolerant. The cake soaks up all these liquids, making it a super decadent treat. If you’ve never had this traditional Latino dessert, prepared to be delighted, and have the coffee pot a-ready. 

10. Ponche Navideño

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Traditional Mexican fruit punch is a hot, delicious concoction. Made with more than ten fruits including apple, tamarind, jamaica, tejocotes, raisins. This punch is spiced with cinnamon, clove, and piloncillo. It’s basically Christmas in a cup.

11. Camotes en dulce 

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Mexican candied sweet potatoes are a must. Día de los Muertos, on Nov. 1, marks the beginning of Camote season. ‘Camotes Enmielados’ is made of sweet potatoes, simmered in a cinnamon and piloncillo syrup. This dish makes for the perfect fall treat. 

12. Guatemalan Atol

Credit: guatemala / Instagram

Made of ground corn, the flavors of this drink range from cinnamon to black beans to chocolate to cajeta. Guatemalan Atol, or Atole in Mexico, is a drink made differently in many countries of Latin America, but there’s one thing that remains the same everywhere, and that is that it’s a fall-winter staple you can’t miss out on.