Entertainment

Froy Gutierrez Is Supernatural Mexican Eye Candy And This Post Proves It

@froy / Instagram

Froy Gutierrez has played so many different roles in his short 20 years of life that you may see him as Nolan from “Teen Wolf,” Charlie from “Bella and the Bulldogs,” and Josh Flores, Elena’s almost boyfriend, from “One Day at a Time.” Or maybe you’re just into Froy Gutierrez because you’ve seen a photo of him.

Before you just see him as eye candy, get to know the guy a little. Here are 20 facts about Froy Gutierrez that, once you know, you’ll love him for it.

Gutierrez has only been acting for a few years.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

In an interview with Regard Mag, Gutierrez said that, while he started acting as a hobby, he always was “obsessed with storytelling, drunk on it. Even when I was little, I knew that film and TV were immersive in ways that books were not, and spoke in ways that orators could not articulate. Little me would watch and replay the ‘Hercules’ movie daily. As I grew older, that hunger for good storytelling stuck with me. I guess I’ve always been profoundly enamored with this industry.”

Gutierrez grew up between Mexico and Texas.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

While he was born in Dallas, he lived in Guadalajara for five years and is Mexican on his father’s side.

Caption: “happy mother’s day to the coolest cat in town. sincerely, grumpy baby. ➖🧤➖”

He considers his bilingual childhood “more of a privilege than anything else.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He explained to Buzzfeed what it was like to code-switch between America and Mexico: “I’d go to Mexico and have a very ‘American’ accent when I spoke Spanish, then I’d come back to the States and I’d speak English with a Mexican accent. So, it was really funny to be both but neither one at the same time.”

His favorite curse word in Spanish is “cabrón.”

CREDIT: @NewsGutierrez / Twitter

Spanish curse words are better than English curse words. Maybe it is the emotion that comes through when you speak Spanish, or it is the fact that Spanish curse words are the best.

He joined the Dallas Children’s Theater just for fun.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He’s always looked at acting as sort of a hobby and followed that passion. That theater group was how he was discovered and brought into a local musical, “Teen Brain.”

He dropped out of an Economics major in college to take on “Teen Wolf.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram
When Regard Mag asked what he would be doing if he wasn’t an actor, he said, “Before acting, I was studiously aiming for a career as an economist, believe it or not!”

He grew up watching “Teen Wolf.”

CREDIT: @froynextdoor / Twitter

Gutierrez said that acting was always a passion, never a career goal. He never expected to be a star in the show that his friends would break down week after week at lunch.

He always felt like “the new kid” on set.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He started out as a guest and was suddenly on set with all these people he’s seen all over Tumblr for years. He told Buzzfeed, “So in my first couple of episodes I just kept thinking, I am going to keep to myself and do my best work. And if they talk to me they talk to me, and if they don’t they don’t. I definitely felt like the new kid [laughs]!”

He did take some souvenirs from the “Teen Wolf” set.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

Don’t worry, Gutierrez is a good Latino boy and “of course, I checked with the wardrobe people first.” He told Buzzfeed, “Because the show was ending and they were auctioning off everything anyways, they let us pick out things to keep. I kept Nolan’s shoes and the hoodie with his number on the back.”

He was shocked when he finally got to play Josh Flores, a Latino, on Netflix’s “One Day at a Time.”

CREDIT: Netflix

The showrunner, Gloria Calderón Kellet, had made it very clear to him that Josh Flores would be played by a Latina actor, which, according to his interview with Buzzfeed, “is usually not a great sign for me, because they’ll invite me in to read, but then want someone who looks more of a certain way. Still, I went in anyways, and when I got the call that I landed the role I was genuinely shocked.”

He didn’t know who Rita Moreno was at first, but his very excited father schooled him.

CREDIT: @melissavandew / Twitter

Apparently, when he told his father he got the role and gave the list of actors, he said, “Rita Moreno! ¡No manches, güey!” 😂

From Gutierrez’s account, Rita Moreno is the abuela we all deserve.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He told Buzzfeed, “Honestly, she has just done so much for the Latinx community. I remember after the first season wrapped she invited all the young Latinx people on the show to her apartment, she showed us her Oscar and her Grammy, which we got to hold! She was walking us through how the industry works and told us how she dealt with X, Y, and Z situations. “

Recently, Gutierrez has been trying out a career in music.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

It wasn’t until he heard Pure Heroine by Lorde that he felt a deep connection to music. “Music for me comes from a more experimental place more than anything,” he told Buzzfeed. “I find all art forms very compelling, but acting and music for me are the things that I am compelled to the most.”

He just released his first single, “Fix Me.”

CREDIT: @froynextdoor / Twitter

I know what you’re thinking. Another actor trying to make it in music. Truly, you should listen to “Fix Me,” because Gutierrez’s voice has surprising range. The song is an upbeat anthem for folks just trying to get their life together.

His favorite bands in middle school were Linkin Park, Green Day, and Blink-182.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He told Buzzfeed how, “In middle school, I had a lot of feelings of estrangement and loneliness that were very new to me and I very much leaned on some of my favorite bands at the time, like Linkin Park, Green Day, and Blink-182, and drew a lot of emotional courage from them.”

His favorite Selena song is “Como La Flor.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

Boy’s Mexican-American from Texas. Of course he would have a favorite Selena song. He has a favorite Selena song and it’s because his primo used to play it all the time.

Your boy is messy.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

In 2017, he told Regard Mag that when it comes to fashion, he’s not the guy to ask. “I know for a fact that my room is ridiculously messy. All my clothes are from Target and the thrift store by my house. As I’m writing you, I’m wearing gym shorts from my freshman year and a black t shirt I purchased on clearance. I would not be the guy you go to for fashion/style advice.”

He used to work for Build a Bear. 🐻

CREDIT: @froynextdoor / Twitter

He also worked for AT&T, Hasbro, Boy Scouts of America and more.

Caption: “she doesn’t want me cause of my dirty laundry”

He recently starred in a feature film, “A Cowgirl’s Story.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

The film is about a young girl whose parents are fighting in the Afghanistan War. Gutierrez plays Jason, a country teenager being overly pressured by his father to run the family business. This outfit suits Gutierrez and that’s all I know.

Look out for Gutierrez in Season 2 of Hulu’s “Light as a Feather.”

CREDIT: @urfavesasnack / Twitter

Gutierrez will play a character named Ridge in the supernatural thriller. The “Teen Wolf” fandom can celebrate Gutierrez staying in the supernatural realm, though we don’t expect any werewolves to come out to play in this series.

READ: Netflix Canceled ‘One Day At A Time’ And Fans Are Livid With The Network’s Decision

Clandestine Mass Graves Keep Popping Up In Mexico But Many Wonder If The Government Will Do Anything To Identify The Bodies

Things That Matter

Clandestine Mass Graves Keep Popping Up In Mexico But Many Wonder If The Government Will Do Anything To Identify The Bodies

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Ever since then president Felipe Calderon Hinojosa decided to wage a frontal war against the Mexican drug cartels in 2006, gruesome scenes have been found throughout Mexico. Other events such as the capture of El Chapo Guzman and the formation of the Los Zetas cartel has also led to the fragmentation of the cartels. 

Whereas in the 1990s and early 2000s the Sinaloa Cartel and the Gulf Cartel has a strict demarcation of their territories, today there are about a dozen cartels that are fighting for control of the main passageway for drugs into the United States, which is by far the largest and most profitable market in the world. This turf war has led to Dantesque violence and suffering. One of the most heartbreaking legacies of the Cartel Wars is the discovery of dozens of clandestine mass graves sprinkled all throughout Mexico. These deaths are the product of multiple local and geopolitical factors, such as the demand for drugs in the United States, the availability of guns North of the Border and corruption in Mexico. 

A new clandestine mass grave has been found in Jalisco, Mexico: 29 bodies were left in plastic bags.

Credit: Vice en Español / YouTube

Gerardo Solis, Attorney General in Jalisco, said that the discovery is located in the affluent municipality of Zapopan. 13 complete and 16 incomplete bodies were found. At least two of the victims are women and as the site is scrapped more bodies could be found. The bodies were dismembered and dumped inside a total of 119 bags. As reported by Vanguard,  the state’s special prosecutor for missing persons cases, Blanca Trujillo, said: “Different body parts are being examined by forensic anthropologists and analysts to determine to what extent the number is going to increase”. 

The gruesome discovery was made in the state of Jalisco, home of the increasingly powerful Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion or CJNG.

Credit: Mazatlán Post / Screenshot

This cartel is famous for its brutal methods and for the total control they hold over their territory. They are so oblivious to the authorities that they parade through rural roads and highways on trucks marked with their logo. This cartel has been ranked by United States Authorities as one of the five most dangerous criminal organizations in the world. 

This is not the first of such gruesome discoveries: on the contrary, mass graves are a constant in contemporary Mexico.

Credit: fosas-clandestinas-mexico-1110×580. Digital image. Sopitas. 

In Jalisco alone, multiple burial sites have been found in recent months. As reported by Mail Online: “In July, prosecutors found 21 bodies in the yard of a house near Guadalajara. In May, the remains of at least 34 people were found at two separate properties in Jalisco. In March, workers were removing mud and debris to clear a storm drain at another spot on the outskirts of Guadalajara, when they began finding plastic bags with the odor of dead bodies. In the end, they pulled a total of 20 bodies out of the storm drain”. Almost 2,000 clandestine mass graves have been found in Mexico over the past eleven years. Some of the bodies belong to Central American migrants who are trying to reach the United States in hope for better life. 

Some people just disappear and families are left to their own devices when it comes to finding their loved one’s remains.

Credit: Screen capture. El Dia Despues. YouTube 

There are over 40,000 people reported missing in Mexico. Authorities are often negligent and missing persons are never found. After families have given up hope of seeing their loved ones alive, they start looking for remains. It takes years to gather clues. Many mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters take matters into their own hands and look for bones, clothes or any sort of evidence in mountains, forests and deserts. This documentary explores the issue. 

The state of Coahuila has been the site of unspeakable atrocities 

Clandestine mass graves have been found in other states, but Coahuila is infamous for sites, such as the municipality of Patrocinio, that have been described as extermination camps. Families have found multiple remains and clothes that indicate that bodies have been burnt to erase traces. The remains of women and children have also been found.

In 2017, Mail Online reported on the discovery of a site that housed the remains of 3,000 victims: “Activists found the skeletal remains on Saturday after an anonymous tip-off that the area was being used as an ‘extermination center’ by gangsters. They say the bodies were likely dissolved in acid, burned, then broken up with shovels in an attempt to dispose of them. The bodies were burned ‘for hours’, the activists said, with diesel, scrap tires and pieces of wood thrown in to help the blaze.Once the fire was out whatever was left was poured on to the floor where it was smashed to pieces with shovels”.

We have no words for the sheer brutality of these acts.  

2019 has been one of the most violent years, if not the most, for Mexico. But most crimes are not reported.

Credit: Giphy. @ViceEnEspanol

According to The Scottish Sun: “This year, the number of deaths attributed to the drug wars between January and June was recorded at 17,000 – a new record”. Let that sink in: 17,000, enough to fill a small arena. Most disappearances and crimes in general, however, are not reported in fear of being targeted by organized crime or corrupt authorities.

Selena Gomez Announces New Netflix Series ‘Living Undocumented’

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Announces New Netflix Series ‘Living Undocumented’

Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty Images

Selena Gomez continues her reign as a Netflix producer with Living Undocumented. It is always great when celebrities use their platforms to enrich and educate. Gomez has a huge platform and can generate huge numbers. 13 Reasons Why blew Netflix’s expectations out of the water, and I can’t help but think it’s because of Gomez’s enormous Instagram following. The girl has reach. 

As you might have guessed, Living Undocumented is a documentary series that follows the lives of undocumented immigrants as they navigate life under the looming threat of increasingly cruel immigration policies and ICE raids.

Selena Gomez announces Living Undocumented on Instagram

“I am so humbled to be a part of Netflix’s documentary series Living Undocumented. The immigration issue is more complex than one administration, one law or the story you hear about on the news. These are real people in your community, your neighbors, your friends—they are all part of the country we call home. I can’t wait for you guys to see this and hope it impacts you like it impacted me. Available globally October 2,” Gomez wrote.

Living Undocumented 

Living Undocumented will focus on eight undocumented families. Premiering on October 2nd on Netflix, the show will chronicle the families as they face possible deportation. The narratives will range from hopeful to infuriating, but the series will put a human face on a dehumanized group of people. 

It cannot be said again that the United States has always struggled with two contradictory narratives: the one where it is a beacon of hope for the tired, hungry, and poor, versus the one where it has upheld numerous racist and xenophobic immigration policies. This is an issue that predates Trumpito, even if he has kicked it into it’s most degrading form. 

“I chose to produce this series, Living Undocumented because, over the past few years, the word ‘immigrant’ has seemingly become a negative word,” said Gomez. “My hope is that the series can shed light on what it’s like to live in this country as an undocumented immigrant firsthand, from the courageous people who have chosen to share their stories.”

Gomez is joined by executive producers Eli Holzman, Aaron Saidman, Mandy Teefey, Anna Chai, and Sean O’Grady. Chai will also co-direct the series.

“Living Undocumented is designed to illuminate one of the most important issues of our time. But rather than discussing this issue with only statistics and policy debates, we wanted viewers to hear directly from the immigrants themselves, in their own words, with all the power and emotion that these stories reflect.”

Humanizing immigrants is key

People don’t just bring guns into Walmarts to kill 22 innocent humans beings for no reason. It is no secret that President Trump’s dehumanizing language was a catalyst for the El Paso shooting. The suspect whose name shall not be invoked told officers he was looking to kill “Mexicans.” Mexicans — the Latinxs Trump referred to as rapists and criminals. The mass murderer also said he wanted to stop a “Hispanic Invasion,” in his manifesto. Trump called Central Americans “invaders.” 

According to Pew Research Center, this year they found that 58 percent of Latinx adults say they experienced discrimination because of their race or ethnicity. Across all races and ethnic groups, two-thirds of individuals surveyed say that expressing racist views has become more common since Trump was elected. 

This year, at a Trump rally, supporters were cheering about shooting immigrants. 

“How do you stop these people?” Trump asks. Then someone yelled back, “Shoot them.” Trump smiled. The crowd cheered. Three months later, the El Paso shooting took 22 lives.

“The language that criminalizes and makes Latinos out to be evil is affecting our own citizens and it’s going to have both short- and long-term consequences that we are starting to see in the Latino population,” Elizabeth Vaquera, an associate professor at George Washington University who studies vulnerable groups, told the Washington Post.

A Bipartisan Non-Issue Becomes A Partisan Issue

This immigration “issue” started off as a hoax but through Trump’s horrible policies he created this new immigration crisis. In 2017, when Trump took office, migrants arrested at the border were at the lowest level in three decades. 

Three former employees of U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security wrote in Politico, the border crisis is all Trump’s fault.

 “It is Donald Trump himself who is responsible. Through misguided policies, political stunts and a failure of leadership, the president has created the conditions that allowed the asylum problem at the border to explode into a crisis.” 

Public Religion Research Institute survey found that 80 percent of Democrats view the fact that the majority of the United States will be nonwhite by 2045 as a good thing, while 61 percent of Republicans say it is bad. 

The barrage of harmful rhetoric has turned what was not even a problem into a national crisis with opinions straddling partisan lines, and a heightened hatred of Latinx people. Living Undocumented might be exactly what this country needs.