Entertainment

Froy Gutierrez Is Supernatural Mexican Eye Candy And This Post Proves It

Froy Gutierrez has played so many different roles in his short 20 years of life that you may see him as Nolan from “Teen Wolf,” Charlie from “Bella and the Bulldogs,” and Josh Flores, Elena’s almost boyfriend, from “One Day at a Time.” Or maybe you’re just into Froy Gutierrez because you’ve seen a photo of him.

Before you just see him as eye candy, get to know the guy a little. Here are 20 facts about Froy Gutierrez that, once you know, you’ll love him for it.

Gutierrez has only been acting for a few years.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

In an interview with Regard Mag, Gutierrez said that, while he started acting as a hobby, he always was “obsessed with storytelling, drunk on it. Even when I was little, I knew that film and TV were immersive in ways that books were not, and spoke in ways that orators could not articulate. Little me would watch and replay the ‘Hercules’ movie daily. As I grew older, that hunger for good storytelling stuck with me. I guess I’ve always been profoundly enamored with this industry.”

Gutierrez grew up between Mexico and Texas.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

While he was born in Dallas, he lived in Guadalajara for five years and is Mexican on his father’s side.

Caption: “happy mother’s day to the coolest cat in town. sincerely, grumpy baby. ➖????➖”

He considers his bilingual childhood “more of a privilege than anything else.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He explained to Buzzfeed what it was like to code-switch between America and Mexico: “I’d go to Mexico and have a very ‘American’ accent when I spoke Spanish, then I’d come back to the States and I’d speak English with a Mexican accent. So, it was really funny to be both but neither one at the same time.”

His favorite curse word in Spanish is “cabrón.”

CREDIT: @NewsGutierrez / Twitter

Spanish curse words are better than English curse words. Maybe it is the emotion that comes through when you speak Spanish, or it is the fact that Spanish curse words are the best.

He joined the Dallas Children’s Theater just for fun.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He’s always looked at acting as sort of a hobby and followed that passion. That theater group was how he was discovered and brought into a local musical, “Teen Brain.”

He dropped out of an Economics major in college to take on “Teen Wolf.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram
When Regard Mag asked what he would be doing if he wasn’t an actor, he said, “Before acting, I was studiously aiming for a career as an economist, believe it or not!”

He grew up watching “Teen Wolf.”

CREDIT: @froynextdoor / Twitter

Gutierrez said that acting was always a passion, never a career goal. He never expected to be a star in the show that his friends would break down week after week at lunch.

He always felt like “the new kid” on set.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He started out as a guest and was suddenly on set with all these people he’s seen all over Tumblr for years. He told Buzzfeed, “So in my first couple of episodes I just kept thinking, I am going to keep to myself and do my best work. And if they talk to me they talk to me, and if they don’t they don’t. I definitely felt like the new kid [laughs]!”

He did take some souvenirs from the “Teen Wolf” set.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

Don’t worry, Gutierrez is a good Latino boy and “of course, I checked with the wardrobe people first.” He told Buzzfeed, “Because the show was ending and they were auctioning off everything anyways, they let us pick out things to keep. I kept Nolan’s shoes and the hoodie with his number on the back.”

He was shocked when he finally got to play Josh Flores, a Latino, on Netflix’s “One Day at a Time.”

CREDIT: Netflix

The showrunner, Gloria Calderón Kellet, had made it very clear to him that Josh Flores would be played by a Latina actor, which, according to his interview with Buzzfeed, “is usually not a great sign for me, because they’ll invite me in to read, but then want someone who looks more of a certain way. Still, I went in anyways, and when I got the call that I landed the role I was genuinely shocked.”

He didn’t know who Rita Moreno was at first, but his very excited father schooled him.

CREDIT: @melissavandew / Twitter

Apparently, when he told his father he got the role and gave the list of actors, he said, “Rita Moreno! ¡No manches, güey!” ????

From Gutierrez’s account, Rita Moreno is the abuela we all deserve.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He told Buzzfeed, “Honestly, she has just done so much for the Latinx community. I remember after the first season wrapped she invited all the young Latinx people on the show to her apartment, she showed us her Oscar and her Grammy, which we got to hold! She was walking us through how the industry works and told us how she dealt with X, Y, and Z situations. “

Recently, Gutierrez has been trying out a career in music.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

It wasn’t until he heard Pure Heroine by Lorde that he felt a deep connection to music. “Music for me comes from a more experimental place more than anything,” he told Buzzfeed. “I find all art forms very compelling, but acting and music for me are the things that I am compelled to the most.”

He just released his first single, “Fix Me.”

CREDIT: @froynextdoor / Twitter

I know what you’re thinking. Another actor trying to make it in music. Truly, you should listen to “Fix Me,” because Gutierrez’s voice has surprising range. The song is an upbeat anthem for folks just trying to get their life together.

His favorite bands in middle school were Linkin Park, Green Day, and Blink-182.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

He told Buzzfeed how, “In middle school, I had a lot of feelings of estrangement and loneliness that were very new to me and I very much leaned on some of my favorite bands at the time, like Linkin Park, Green Day, and Blink-182, and drew a lot of emotional courage from them.”

His favorite Selena song is “Como La Flor.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

Boy’s Mexican-American from Texas. Of course he would have a favorite Selena song. He has a favorite Selena song and it’s because his primo used to play it all the time.

Your boy is messy.

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

In 2017, he told Regard Mag that when it comes to fashion, he’s not the guy to ask. “I know for a fact that my room is ridiculously messy. All my clothes are from Target and the thrift store by my house. As I’m writing you, I’m wearing gym shorts from my freshman year and a black t shirt I purchased on clearance. I would not be the guy you go to for fashion/style advice.”

He used to work for Build a Bear. ????

CREDIT: @froynextdoor / Twitter

He also worked for AT&T, Hasbro, Boy Scouts of America and more.

Caption: “she doesn’t want me cause of my dirty laundry”

He recently starred in a feature film, “A Cowgirl’s Story.”

CREDIT: @froy / Instagram

The film is about a young girl whose parents are fighting in the Afghanistan War. Gutierrez plays Jason, a country teenager being overly pressured by his father to run the family business. This outfit suits Gutierrez and that’s all I know.

Look out for Gutierrez in Season 2 of Hulu’s “Light as a Feather.”

CREDIT: @urfavesasnack / Twitter

Gutierrez will play a character named Ridge in the supernatural thriller. The “Teen Wolf” fandom can celebrate Gutierrez staying in the supernatural realm, though we don’t expect any werewolves to come out to play in this series.

READ: Netflix Canceled ‘One Day At A Time’ And Fans Are Livid With The Network’s Decision

Mexico’s Beaches Are Still Full Of Crowds Celebrating Semana Santa Despite Calls For Social Distancing

Things That Matter

Mexico’s Beaches Are Still Full Of Crowds Celebrating Semana Santa Despite Calls For Social Distancing

@YucatanPareja / Twitter

Although Mexico’s President has come under fire from much of the international community for his relaxed approach to confronting the Covid-19 crisis, many municipalities and states are taking an aggressive stance to halt the pandemic.

In fact, all of Mexico’s more than 6,000 miles of coastline have been closed. That means zero access to beaches – a major draw for millions of local and international tourists.

Officially, all of Mexico’s beaches are closed.

Credit: @localesoaxaca / Twitter

Deputy Health Minister Hugo López-Gatell told a press conference on Thursday that the closure order applies to every beach in the country until the end of the national emergency on April 30.

“The order has been given. It obliges state and municipal authorities to take coherent measures and suspend tourist activity on beaches, be it international or local tourism,” he said.

Other states had already begun to close beaches earlier this week.

Those closures impacted some of the county’s most popular tourist attractions, including Baja California Sur, Baja California and Oaxaca, where local authorities closed down the country’s only nudist beach, Zipolite. Like beaches throughout Mexico, Zipolite is a big draw during the Semana Santa (Easter Week) vacation in April.

Authorities in Tamaulipas and Sonora had also begun to close beaches before the order, and Guerrero announced Wednesday that its beaches would be closed beginning Thursday.

“The state government makes this delicate decision in an unsatisfactory setting: we have had to choose between protecting life and suspending economic activity,” the state government said in a press release.

These authorities recognize that the economy – although it will be impacted – will recover.

Credit: Secretaria de Salud / Gobierno de Mexico

It said that the economy will always be recoverable as long as the human factor still exists and urged citizens to stay at home and practice other methods of social distancing.

But not everyone seems to have got the memo – as miles of beaches remained full of vacationers.

Credit: Pixabay

Even though it’s been proven that social distancing is our greatest tool against the growing pandemic, some are choosing to ignore these guidelines. And as a result, their risking the health of millions.

Over the weekend, people decided to defy the government’s order to stay at home and instead enjoy a day out at the beach in the Gulf coast state of Veracruz. The newspaper Milenio reported that Playa Villa del Mar near the port city of Veracruz was packed on Friday, Saturday and Sunday with both revelers and vendors offering products such as swimming suits, food and alcoholic beverages.

President López Obrador on Friday ruled out any possibility of implementing “draconian measures” such as a curfew to contain the spread of Covid-19, while he said two weeks ago that he wanted to avoid a complete shutdown of the economy because it would disproportionately hurt the poor.

As if people needed another reason to stay clear of beaches – other than you know, a global pandemic – wild animals are making a comeback in less populated areas.

Credit: @infolliteras / Twitter

Videos have captured the animals in Quintana Roo, where the resorts of Cancun and Riviera Maya are located.

One video, which has been watched 120,000 times on Facebook, shows a huge crocodile swimming along a canal between balconies. The people filming express their shock at the animal as he swims past without stopping for the people watching him.

Another video captured a jaguar roaming the streets of Tulum. According to local media, the big cat was spotted near the Grand Sirenis Riviera Maya Resort & Spa.

The Coronavirus Is Getting Its Own Beer And Concha At This Mexico City Panadería And We Can’t Help But Laugh A Little

Culture

The Coronavirus Is Getting Its Own Beer And Concha At This Mexico City Panadería And We Can’t Help But Laugh A Little

@lacornetanegra / Twitter

No one can accuse Mexicans of having no sense of humor. Whether it be reactions to cartel violence, an ineffective government plagued by corruption, or a global pandemic – many Mexicans turn to memes and humor to confront real issues. Enter the CoronaBeer and ConchaVirus.

Yes, the Coronavirus has ravaged communities around the world. And Mexico itself hasn’t escaped the crisis – more than 2,000 cases have been reported so far and it’s expected to get much worse.

Entrepreneurs are trying to find some common ground and an opportunity with a very scary reality.

Martha Rivas is part of the team who created the now viral “Conchavirus.” She says, in an interview with UnoTV, that the creation came from “a genuine concern about how to face this crisis due to the coronavirus.”

The creators of this peculiar product found in the “Conchavirus” how to cope with the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus. They’re bringing in the pesos like never before.

Yes, the ConchaVirus is real.

Credit: @lacornetanegra / Twitter

The “Conchavirus” was created in Mexico City’s bustling Iztapalapa district by a team of creative panaderos/as. The interesting looking confection is made with red icing, concha dough, and a lot of creativity. The team behind the now viral pan dulce, hand decorate each and every concha to make sure that it is best representative of the illustrations of the virus, provided by doctors and scientists.

For anybody wondering – a large Conchavirus is going for $6.50 pesos (or about 25¢ USD). There’s also apparently the “Manta-ConchaVirus,” but that’s…a whole other story.

It’s so real, it even got its own segment on a local news channel.

After the publication of a photo that went viral on social media, chilangos – or residents of Mexico City – began a crazed search search for the conchas. This viral moment has already been reflected in the huge growth of sales.

Meanwhile, Corona has suffered a major decline in sales because of the namesake virus.

Credit: @GabrielFrancoJr / Twitter

I mean, remember when rumors started flying around that some people actually thought the virus and iconic Mexican beer brand were somehow linked? Yea, it was a thing.

And yea, Corona beer already existed long before the pandemic but this CoronaBeer is totally different.

Obviously there isn’t much too celebrate right now given the on-going health crisis, but one beer makers hopes what when all is said and done – people will toast to good health with his new brew.

A brewery in Mexico’s state of Hidalgo has appropriated the name of the deadly virus and used it for a product he hopes will bring people together – Coronavirus Beer.

Isaac Palafox, the entrepreneur, owns a chain of cafés and was already serving the beer but it didn’t yet have a name. He describes the beer as an English-style brew with hints of chocolate, molasses and coffee extract.

“This drink is already being produced and sold in my cafes, but it didn’t have a name, until now,” he said, adding that the coffee he uses to make the beer is toasted by artisanal roasters whose methods date back to the year 1900 and incorporate practices brought to Hidalgo by German immigrants to the region.

But Mexican businesspeople aren’t the only ones looking to capitalize on the coronavirus. The newspaper El País reported that six brands in Spain have made trademark requests for names related to Covid-19, including T-shirts that read, “I survived the coronavirus.”