Entertainment

She Saved Lives During the 2017 Mexico Earthquake And Now After 10 Years Of Bravery She’s Getting Her Retirement Party

After being part of over 50 rescue operations, saving dozens of lives and finding over 40 bodies in disaster areas, Frida, a 10-year-old Labrador retriever, is calling it quits. The Mexican Navy held a ceremony for Frida that was part of “International Rescuer Day” in Mexico this past Sunday. Frida was honored with a toy that the Mexican government said: “symbolized the beginning of her new life.”

Frida became a national hero in Mexico during deadly earthquakes that killed more than 300 people in Mexico City in 2017.

After a disastrous magnitude-7.1 earthquake rocked Mexico in September 2017, the pup became a household name. Two devastating earthquakes shook Mexico just days apart killing more than 300 people, including 205 in Mexico City. The quakes destroyed and caused major damage to multiple structures.

Frida helped in rescue efforts in both disasters as she assisted in finding more than 40 bodies and saving 12 lives. She was famously captured sniffing her way through rubble as part of the Mexican navy’s canine unite. Images showed the K-9 wearing goggles and neoprene booties as she joined first responders looking for the children that died in a school in Mexico City during the earthquake.

In total, there were 15 dogs that were deployed during the search and rescue but Frida quickly garnered the most attention. “Her bark always gave hope, and in moments of pain and uncertainty she brought relief,” Eduardo Redondo, a Deputy Naval Minister, told the BBC.

Frida’s journey as a rescue dog began before the devastating 2017 earthquake.

Ten-year-old Frida was part of multiple rescue missions involving earthquakes not only in Mexico but also in Ecuador in 2016 and Haiti in 2010. Frida was also part of rescue efforts in 2013 after an explosion at the headquarters of Mexican state oil company Pemex. She was also part of the rescue team that helped find victims after the 2012 landslide in Guatemala.

Frida was honored with a statue last year for her rescue efforts.

Frida’s international fame has made her a national symbol of Mexican strength and pride. Last summer she received a bronze statue on her honor, along with her trainer, Israel Arauz, by her side, at a park in Puebla City.

The plaque on the statue reads: “Memorable symbols of strength that Mexicans can have when we decide to unite for a greater cause.”

People on social media expressed their gratitude for Frida on an amazing career.

Credit: @zazulturqueza / Twitter

There has been so much love and appreciation for Frida after news broke that she was calling it a career. People who never knew or even previously heard of her took to social media to share their appreciation for Frida’s work.

“Today Frida, the heroic Mexican Navy rescue dog, retires. She saved many lives and during the Mexico City earthquake of 2017, she became a national hero and symbol of hope. GRACIAS FRIDA!,” one user wrote.

Even actor Chris Evans chimed in on Frida’s retirement asking: “What did we do to deserve dogs?” I think after hearing Frida’s incredible story we are all asking ourselves the same thing.

“Frida stole the heart of all Mexico and thousands more abroad… Her bark always gave hope, and in moments of pain and uncertainty she brought relief,” said Deputy Naval Minister Eduardo Redondo, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP). “Frida, mission accomplished, with honor.”

READ: This Mexican Dog Has His Own Instagram Account And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

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9 Films, Docs and Series About Latinas to Watch Before Women’s History Month Comes to an End

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9 Films, Docs and Series About Latinas to Watch Before Women’s History Month Comes to an End

Whether you want to celebrate Women’s History Month with a movie night or appreciate media about powerful mujeres year-round, you’re probably looking for a few films, documentaries or TV series to add to your streaming queue right now. Regrettably (and shamefully), most of the lists cropping on entertainment news sites don’t feature projects made for, by or about Latinas. With that in mind, we’ve put together some titles centering narratives about Latina trailblazers and heroines from Latin American and U.S. history. So clear your weekend cal and purchase all of your fave movie theater snacks, because you can watch (most of) these films, documentaries and series right from your computer screen.

1. Dolores

If you’re looking for documentaries about Latina heroines, start with Dolores, the 2017 film about the life and activism of Chicana labor union activist Dolores Huerta. The doc, executive produced by Carlos Santana and Benjamin Bratt, and directed by Bratt’s brother, Peter, delves into how the 90-year-old co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (later named the United Farm Workers), her famous “Sí se puede” rallying cry and her role in the women’s rights movement. Including interviews with Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and more, Dolores celebrates the history and ongoing activism of one of the country’s most critical civil rights leaders. Watch Dolores on Amazon Prime.

2. Isabel: The Intimate Story Of Isabel Allende

Isabel: The Intimate Story Of Isabel Allende, a three-part docuseries about the famed Chilean author and feminist, is one of the most exciting new drops. The HBO Max series, directed by Rodrigo Bazaes, premiered on March 12, just in time for Women’s History Month. Like all good biopics, Isabel reveals the person behind the icon, portraying Allende’s path from a young woman fighting her way into a male-dominated industry to the most-read Spanish-language author of all time. As the niece of assassinated Chilean President Salvador Allende, the series also gets political, bringing light to her life under the regime of General Augusto Pinochet as well as her own feminist activism. Watch Isabel on HBO Max.

3. Knock Down the House

Knock Down the House portrays the political rise of a Latina icon in the making: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. While the 2019 documentary by Rachel Lears revolves around the 2018 congressional primary campaigns of four progressive women, Ocasio-Cortez, Amy Vilela, Cori Bush and Paula Jean Swearengin, the Puerto Rican now-congresswoman is the only one who wins her race (though Bush won in the next election cycle) and thus much of the film focuses on her story. A first-time candidate with a passion for social justice, a degree in international relations and economics, and a job in bartending, the doc shows how a regular, degular, shmegular girl from the Bronx unseated one of the most powerful Democrats in Congress with a progressive platform and a focus on community. Watch Knock Down the House on Netflix.

4. Lorena: Light-Footed Woman

In 2017, María Lorena Ramírez’s name made international headlines when the young woman defeated 500 other runners from 12 different countries at the Ultra Trail Cerro Rojo in Puebla, Mexico. Ramírez didn’t just stand out because of her speed but also because she ran without professional gear. Instead, she donned the traditional clothes of the Tarahumara, Indigenous people in Chihuahua, Mexico, including a floral skirt and a pair of huaraches. Capturing the world’s attention, Ramírez became the focus of the 2019 documentary Lorena: Light-Footed Woman, which was directed by Juan Carlos Rulfo. The short doc beautifully tells the tale of a young woman’s athletic training in the mountains where she grew up to become a celebrated long-distance runner while staying true to her culture and traditions. Lorena: Light-Footed Woman is streaming on Netflix.

5. Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied!

In Honduras, the most dangerous country in the world for land defenders, Berta Cáceres’ life was taken because of her commitment to the environmental justice struggle. Back in the Central American country, Berta’s assassination hasn’t been forgotten and neither has her fight. The 2017 short doc Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied!, directed by Sam Vinal, shows how her work lives on among Indigenous Lenca and Afro-Indigenous Garifuna people of Honduras, who continue to struggle against capitalism, patriarchy, racism and homophobia, for our land and our water. Watch Berta Didn’t Die, She Multiplied! on Vimeo.

6. Celia

Celia reveals the story of one of the most powerful voices and greatest icons of Latin music, Afro-Cubana salsera Celia Cruz. The Spanish-language novela, produced by Fox Telecolombia for RCN Televisión and Telemundo, starts at the beginning, when Cruz was an aspiring singer in Havana, and takes viewers through to her time joining La Sonora Matancera, leaving her homeland with her would-be husband Pedro Knight and gaining massive superstardom as the “Queen of Salsa.” Watch Celia on AppleTV+.

7. Beauties of the Night

In the first half of the 20th century, showgirls dominated the entertainment scene in Latin America. Their glamorous looks and luxe performances were enjoyed by audiences of all ages and genders. But around the 1970s, as VHS pornos took off, these scantily clad talents started to lose work and, as a result, their lucrative incomes. Oftentimes, these women came from low-income backgrounds and didn’t have a formal education, forcing many of the vedettes to also feel like they’ve lost their sense of purpose and impelling some to take on work they didn’t feel good about in order to stay afloat in the industry. In Beauties of the Night, directed by María José Cuevas, we see some of Mexico and South America’s leading showgirls, Olga Breeskin, Lyn May, Rossy Mendoza, Wanda Seux and Princesa Yamal, and how their lives transformed as the work they were once famous for lost its reverence. Watch Beauties of the Night on Netflix.

8. Frida

The 2002 biographical drama film Frida shares the professional and private life of one of the most famous woman artists of all time, Frida Kahlo. Directed by Julie Taymor and starring Salma Hayek, the Academy Award-nominated film touches on many aspects of the late Mexican artist and feminist’s life, from her life-altering accident in 1922 and her tumultuous relationship with muralist Diego Rivera to her bisexual identity, political affiliations and, of course, her time-defying art and self portraits. Watch Frida on Amazon Prime.

9. Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go For It


With a career spanning 70 years, Rita Moreno is one of the most famous and beloved actresses of all time. The only Latina to have won all four major annual U.S. entertainment awards, an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony, her own life is certainly worthy of a film; and in 2021, director Mariem Pérez Riera gave the Puerto Rican star what she deserves with Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go for It. The documentary, which premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival on January 29, 2021, features interviews with Moreno, Eva Longoria, Gloria Estefan, Normal Lear, Whoopi Goldberg and more. More than just a celebration of all the barriers Moreno broke, the film also delves into her personal life, including the racism she endured on her road to stardom, the sexual violence she experienced in Hollywood, her struggle with mental health and suicidal ideation and her fight for multidimensional roles for people of color. While Rita Moreno: Just A Girl Who Decided To Go For It isn’t streaming yet, it is set to air on PBS’ American Masters later this year.

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A Woman Saves A Dog During The Texas Snow Storm Using Tortillas

Entertainment

A Woman Saves A Dog During The Texas Snow Storm Using Tortillas

Texas recently dealt with one of the worst winter storms in its history. Millions were left without water and power for days and Sen. Ted Cruz was caught up in a scandal after being caught going on a Mexican vacation. One pup is catching everyone’s attention after being rescued thanks to tortillas.

One lucky dog in San Antonio was saved from the cold by a caring woman with tortillas.

Kristina Salinas-Labrador was out buying tortillas for her family on Thursday when she spotted a dog in the freezing cold in San Antonio, Texas. Instead of driving by, Kristin stopped her car and spent 30 minutes luring the dog to the warmth of her car using tortillas. Kristin told the WOAI reporter that he stopped to save the dog’s life because he was skinny and could likely die from the cold weather that crippled much of Texas.

According to her interview with WOAI, Kristin saved the dog because she felt like helping during the hard times Texans are facing.

“Dogs, they don’t know what’s going on; cats, pets, they don’t know what’s going on,” Kristin told the reporter. “So, we try to help them out – one dog at a time. I’m hoping the next person will stop, too, and help the different strays.”

This isn’t the first time that Kristin or her wife have picked up a stray animal.

Nicole Salinas-Labrador, Kristin’s wife, told NBC News that the dog’s name is now Taco. Nicole admitted that she and her wife often stop for stray dogs and cats when they see them while out and about. Nicole joked that her wife used her “Mexican ways” to get the dog in the car, according to NBC News.

The couple is taking care of Taco until they can find a forever home for the sweet pup.

Credit: San Antonio, TX – Lost Dogs, Cats & Pets / Facebook

“Hello everyone! Thank you for sharing and for your interest! He was scanned for chip and he doesn’t have one. And no one has still claimed him,” Nicole wrote in a comment under the Facebook post. “He is with me and my family for now. He is getting fully vetted today and making sure he is in perfect health. Anyone that is interested in adopting him feel free to PM me. This process will def take some time.. I do extensive background checks to make sure any stray that is in my care goes to the absolute best forever home. Any questions feel free to message me.”

READ: Sen. Ted Cruz Makes Quick U-Turn From Mexico After Outrage He Abandoned His Frozen Texas

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