Entertainment

She Saved Lives During the 2017 Mexico Earthquake And Now After 10 Years Of Bravery She’s Getting Her Retirement Party

After being part of over 50 rescue operations, saving dozens of lives and finding over 40 bodies in disaster areas, Frida, a 10-year-old Labrador retriever, is calling it quits. The Mexican Navy held a ceremony for Frida that was part of “International Rescuer Day” in Mexico this past Sunday. Frida was honored with a toy that the Mexican government said: “symbolized the beginning of her new life.”

Frida became a national hero in Mexico during deadly earthquakes that killed more than 300 people in Mexico City in 2017.

After a disastrous magnitude-7.1 earthquake rocked Mexico in September 2017, the pup became a household name. Two devastating earthquakes shook Mexico just days apart killing more than 300 people, including 205 in Mexico City. The quakes destroyed and caused major damage to multiple structures.

Frida helped in rescue efforts in both disasters as she assisted in finding more than 40 bodies and saving 12 lives. She was famously captured sniffing her way through rubble as part of the Mexican navy’s canine unite. Images showed the K-9 wearing goggles and neoprene booties as she joined first responders looking for the children that died in a school in Mexico City during the earthquake.

In total, there were 15 dogs that were deployed during the search and rescue but Frida quickly garnered the most attention. “Her bark always gave hope, and in moments of pain and uncertainty she brought relief,” Eduardo Redondo, a Deputy Naval Minister, told the BBC.

Frida’s journey as a rescue dog began before the devastating 2017 earthquake.

Ten-year-old Frida was part of multiple rescue missions involving earthquakes not only in Mexico but also in Ecuador in 2016 and Haiti in 2010. Frida was also part of rescue efforts in 2013 after an explosion at the headquarters of Mexican state oil company Pemex. She was also part of the rescue team that helped find victims after the 2012 landslide in Guatemala.

Frida was honored with a statue last year for her rescue efforts.

Frida’s international fame has made her a national symbol of Mexican strength and pride. Last summer she received a bronze statue on her honor, along with her trainer, Israel Arauz, by her side, at a park in Puebla City.

The plaque on the statue reads: “Memorable symbols of strength that Mexicans can have when we decide to unite for a greater cause.”

People on social media expressed their gratitude for Frida on an amazing career.

Credit: @zazulturqueza / Twitter

There has been so much love and appreciation for Frida after news broke that she was calling it a career. People who never knew or even previously heard of her took to social media to share their appreciation for Frida’s work.

“Today Frida, the heroic Mexican Navy rescue dog, retires. She saved many lives and during the Mexico City earthquake of 2017, she became a national hero and symbol of hope. GRACIAS FRIDA!,” one user wrote.

Even actor Chris Evans chimed in on Frida’s retirement asking: “What did we do to deserve dogs?” I think after hearing Frida’s incredible story we are all asking ourselves the same thing.

“Frida stole the heart of all Mexico and thousands more abroad… Her bark always gave hope, and in moments of pain and uncertainty she brought relief,” said Deputy Naval Minister Eduardo Redondo, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP). “Frida, mission accomplished, with honor.”

READ: This Mexican Dog Has His Own Instagram Account And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

Man Arrested For DUI After Police Chase With His Pit Bull Driving Down The Freeway

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Man Arrested For DUI After Police Chase With His Pit Bull Driving Down The Freeway

Jennifer C. / Flickr

A man was arrested for a DUI after police chased the man down the freeway while his dog was “driving.” The man, identified as Alberto Tito Alejandro, was arrested after the car he was in crashed. The incident happened in Lakewood, Washington, about 40 minutes south of Seattle.

During a statewide lockdown due to COVID-19, a 51-year-old man led police on a high-speed chase.

The chase down Interstate 5 reached more than 100 miles per hour. The police attempted to pull Alberto Tito Alejandro over after he hit two cars on the freeway without stopping. The man continued to drive down I-5 until police were able to corner the 1996 Buick and bring the high-speed chase to a stop. Police said that several people had called 911 to report the driver driving erratically.

When the police tried to corner the car, they made a shocking discovery.

Police noticed that the pit bull was in the driver’s seat as the dog’s owner was in the passenger seat steering and working the pedals. According to police who were there for the arrest, the man claimed that he was just teaching his dog how to drive. Police described the pit bull as a “very sweet girl.

The discovery is something that even the police did expect.

“I wish I could make this up,” trooper Heather Axtman told CNN. “I’ve been a trooper for almost 12 years and wow, I’ve never heard this excuse. I’ve been in a lot of high speed chases, I’ve stopped a lot of cars, and never have I gotten an excuse that they were teaching their dog how to drive.”

Watch the video of the high-speed chase below.

READ: Couple Livestream High-Speed Chase After Trying To Smuggle Group Of Undocumented Men

This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

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This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

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Frida Kahlo’s Death Has Long Been The Subject Of Debate —This Play Unpacks The Painter’s Last Week Of Life 

This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art

This Play Explores The Last Week Of Frida Kahlo’s Life —And The Mystery Will Have You On The Edge Of Your Seat

There have been many movies, television dramas and stage productions based on the life and works of Mexico’s most famous artist Frida Kahlo, but none of these stories had ever explored the woman’s last week of life. As it turns out, her death has been an open-ended and unanswered question mark. Many believe there was a cover up, and this play dives deep into the mystery. 

The award-winning playwright and actress, Odalys Nanin explores the mental, emotional and physical condition during the last week of Frida Kahlo’s life in her latest play.

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‘Frida: Stroke of Passion’ peels away the secret cover up of the painter’s death and reveals what or who killed Frida Kahlo.

Until recently, Nanin, managed and produced at the MACHA Theatre in West Hollywood, CA, a company she founded years ago.

After writing and producing nearly a dozen plays, Nanin presented her last production at the MACHA last fall. The play was another original she wrote, this time about Mexico’s most controversial artist, and one of the world’s most famous painters, Frida Kahlo. 

Frida: Stroke of Passion, enjoyed a three-month long run last fall and received rave reviews and awards.

Frida Kahlo died July 13, 1954. Her death certificate alleges cause of death: “pulmunary embolism” but no autopsy was allowed and she was immediately cremated. The play explores her mental, emotional and physical condition during the last week of her life – exposing her love affair with famous Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, Maria Felix, Josephine Baker, Tina Moddoti, Leon Trotsky, a Cuban spy and her complex passionate love for Diego. 

Back by popular demand and with a grant from LA County Arts, DAC and CAC, “Frida: Strokes of Passion” premieres February 7 in Boyle Heights for six shows.

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In Nanin’s tale, Kahlo’s bout with bronchopneumonia and the loss of her right leg left her frail and numb, “Her right leg had been amputated from the knee down so she is either in her wheel chair or bed ridden.  She was under a lot of pain killers and alcohol in order to numb her pain. So she was between a daze of sleep and awakening.”

“Espero que la salida sea gozosa, y espero nunca mas volver.”

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In a diary entry written just days before her death, she wrote, “I hope the exit is joyful — and I hope never to return.” For these reasons, Nanin believes the artist took her own life.

In the play, Nanin delves deeper into Frida’s sexuality.

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“What initiated the spark of passion in me to write about Frida Kahlo was because as a lesbian Latinx I relate to her courage and fearless determination to stand up to injustice and to be the voice of the voiceless through her art and political activities.” 

The main players in the story are Kahlo’s tormented husband, Diego Rivera, the love of her life, but there were other lovers.

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Her passion didn’t just start or end with Rivera, there were several women in-between and one other man who also captured her heart, and during her final days, they all came visiting– taunting and haunting her with the memories they each represented. Women like Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, Mexican movie star Maria Felix, cabaret singer and dancer Josephine Baker, famous model and photographer Tina Modotti, and Cuban revolutionist/spy Teresa Provenza. There was also the ghost of Leon Trotsky, a man she admired and loved and whose murder haunted Kahlo for the rest of her days.

The production has also been released in the form of a book. 

Nanin has written a book capturing her play in print– the story goes far beyond Kahlo’s Mexican and European Surrealism, and her indigenous Mexican culture influence. Frida Kahlo hated societal rules and traditions at every level, and she felt shackled as a woman. In the book, Nanin explores her frustrations, her love affairs, her queerness and overall, her passion for art. 

“Frida – A Stroke of Passion” runs February 7–9 and 14–16 at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and at 2 p.m. on Sundays at the Casa 0101 Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets and more information, click here.