Entertainment

Cardi B, Anuel A, And Fat Joe Joined Forces To Deliver New Track With A Sample Of Salsa Classic ‘Aguanile’

Last night, rapper Fat Joe dropped the new track “Yes” featuring fellow Bronx native Cardi B and Puerto Rican trap star Anuel AA. This is that Latinx heat we need to keep us warm this fall. This marks Cardi B’s third feature this summer following the hits “Wish Wish” with DJ Khaled and “Rodeo” with Lil Nas X. Anuel AA hasn’t been having a bad summer himself with “China” featuring Ozuna, Daddy Yankee, J Balvin and Karol G, dominating the global charts. 

Fat Joe just celebrated his 49th birthday and will be releasing his 12th album “Family Ties” which also marks a reunion with Grammy-winning producer Dre of Cool & Dre. 

I don’t know if you know this but the Bronx’s official national anthem is Terror Squad’s “Lean Back.” Fat Joe is royalty in the Bronx, so it was practically inevitable we would get a Cardi B collab from the legend. This is the essence of boogie down solidarity. It is one thing to be Latinx, it is another thing to be a Latinx from The Bronx — it just is. Yerrr. So while I am sure many people will enjoy this bop, I am far more certain I will hear it blasting outside my window from someone’s car speakers for the rest of my mortal life. 

“Yes” is a yes from me, dawg.

Fat Joe dropped “Yes” at midnight last night. Cardi B and Anuel AA each have a verse on the track which samples Willie Colón and Hector Lavoe’s salsa classic “Aguanilé.” According to Rolling Stone, the 1972 song was inspired by the Yoruba and Spanish word “Aguanilé” which is used in Santería to describe a “spiritual cleanse.” No wonder the sample hauntingly pulls you into the song’s pulsating trap beat.

Joe raps the not safe for work earworm of a hook “A** up, facedown.” Considering these artists’ background, the single is fittingly a new strip club anthem. Cardi B got her start as a stripper in New York City and will play one in the new movie Hustlers alongside Jennifer Lopez and LizzoMeanwhile, Fat Joe plays Winny Win Winford, a New York City strip club owner in Netflix’s She’s Gotta Have It. The artwork for the single features an ’80s style neon sign silhouette of a naked woman on a stripper pole. You know, because we Latinxs love good clean fun in The Bronx. 

La Cardi!

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The dog walker.

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“La Cardi” the rapper says as she jumps on the track, leaning into her Dominican inflection. The song falls into the classic rap paradigm of boastful, decadent, lyrics. Each lyricist takes their turn flexing on the track, and we don’t really need more introspection than that because this song is clearly intended to be a fun club banger. 

“Murder and the money on my mind. My palm and my trigger finger itch,” she spits. “I’ve been in my bag, hopping out of jets.” 

Cardi may even be confirming her Bronx gang affiliation with the lyrics, “Lookin’ for me? Hit my line 1-800-59, BX.” The lyrics seem to allude to 5-9 Brims, a blood gang in The Bronx, at least according to Genius.

A bilingual bop.

Anuel AA’s verse is entirely in Spanish. I love this trend where Latinxs don’t try to assimilate and speak their native tongue. There is something to be said about Justin Bieber having to speak Spanish to get featured on Luis Fonsi’s “Despacito” rather than the other way around. In “Yes,” Anuel boasts about making $15 million a record amidst putting the usual haters in their place.  

Puffy approved. 

“This one is special, you know what I’m sayin? Puff Daddy told me and Cool way back in the day that every hit record has a story,” “Yes” producer Dre said in a series of Instagram stories. “And geeze … let’s just put it this way: This one was months in the making, but it was worth the wait … I think y’all really gonna fuck with it.”

Latinx power.

The Latinx chart domination shall continue henceforth. The Bronx’s come up shall continue ad infinitum as well. 

“When I came out, I knew I wasn’t the best rapper on earth. But I knew there was a bunch of Latinos that felt like me across the country and across the world, who really related to what I was rapping about, and that they would really appreciate it. Same thing when I discovered Big Pun,” Fat Joe told Remezcla of Latinx representation in hip hop. 

It is always great to see Latinx artists not just collaborating together but bringing also sampling throwback Latinx music to introduce it to new generations.

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Bad Bunny Talks Depression And Says Sometimes He Still Feels Like The Boy Who Bagged Groceries Back Home

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks Depression And Says Sometimes He Still Feels Like The Boy Who Bagged Groceries Back Home

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Bad Bunny is on top of the world. Or, at least, that’s how it appears to all of us on the outside enjoying his record-breaking year. Not only did he release three albums in 2020 but he also landed his debut acting role in the Netflix series Narcos: Mexico and from his Instagram stories, he seems to be in a happy, contentful relationship.

But like so many others, Bad Bunny has his experience with mental health issues, of which he recently opened up about in an interview with El País.

Bad Bunny recently spoke up about his struggle with depression.

Despite his immense success that’s catapulted him to, arguably, the world’s biggest superstar, Bad Bunny admits that sometimes he still feels like the young man who bagged groceries in a supermarket.

The reggaetonero revealed in an interview with El País that right as his career really started to take off, he was not happy. “You asked me before how I hadn’t gone crazy. Well, I think that was the moment that was going to determine if I was going to go crazy or not. From 2016 to 2018 I disappeared, I was stuck in a capsule, without knowing anything. The world saw me, but I was missing,” he said.

Although no doctor diagnosed him, he is sure of what was happening. it only did he feel lost and empty but he had stopped doing many of the things that brought him joy, like watching movies and boxing. Without realizing it, he had also fallen out of contact with much of his family, with whom he was typically very close.

“And that’s when I said: who am I? What’s going on?” he told El País. When he returned home to Puerto Rico from spending time in Argentina, he was able to get back into the right state of mind and remember who he was.

Despite his success, Bad Bunny still worries he’s in financial trouble.

Although today, he is the number one Latin artist on Spotify and the awards for his music keep coming, there are times when Bad Bunny still thinks that he has financial problems.

“Not long ago, I was 100% clear in my head what I have achieved, maybe a year or six months ago; but until then, many times I forgot, I felt that I was the kid from the supermarket. He would happen something and say: “Hell!” And then: “Ah, no, wait, if I have here,” he said, touching his pocket.

Much like Bad Bunny, J Balvin has also been candid about his own mental health struggles.

Bad Bunny is just the most recent to speak to the emotional havoc he experiences despite being a global superstar. And, thankfully, like many other celebrities, he’s been able to find refuge in a reality that allows him to keep his feet on the ground so that he too can enjoy the achievements of his career.

Much like El Conejo, J Balvin is known for the brightness of his style and mentality. But he’s long addressed the importance of caring for one’s mental health. During his Arcoíris Tour, he encouraged people to not be ashamed of seeking professional help, and let the audience know they are not alone.   

“Las enfermedades de salud mental son una realidad. Yo he sufrido de depresión y he sufrido de ansiedad, así que tengo que aceptarlo. Y eso me hace más humano, me hace entender que la vida tiene pruebas,” Balvin said. “Pero si alguien está pasando una situación difícil, no están solos, siempre llega la luz. Tarde o temprano llega la luz.”  

“Mental health illnesses are a reality. I have suffered from depression and anxiety, so I have to accept it. And this makes me more human. It makes me understand that life has challenges,” Balvin said in Spanish. “But if someone is going through a difficult time, they are not alone, light always comes. Sooner or later, the light comes.”  

We need more men like Benito and J Balvin to speak up about their mental health struggles, to help destroy the stigma that exists within our community.

And in the same interview, he also spoke about why he works to elevate the Spanish language.

As for the possibility of singing in English, the answer remains the same: a resounding no.

“You have to break this view that the gringos are Gods…No, papi,” he told El País. And, although he’s collaborated with artists like Drake, Cardi B and Jennifer Lopez, he has always sang in Spanish and with his famous accent.

“I am very proud to reach the level where we are speaking in Spanish, and not only in Spanish, but in the Spanish that we speak in Puerto Rico. Without changing the accent,” he said.

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Cardi B Explains Why She Turned Off ‘WAP’ When Her Daughter Walked Into the Room: ‘I Don’t Make Music For Kids’

Entertainment

Cardi B Explains Why She Turned Off ‘WAP’ When Her Daughter Walked Into the Room: ‘I Don’t Make Music For Kids’

Photo via kulturekiari/Instagram

Cardi B is tired of people criticizing her for the racy lyrics to “WAP”. On Monday, the Grammy-winning rapper defended herself against haters who called her out for turning off her multi-platinum song “WAP” when her daughter entered the room.

The drama started earlier this week when Cardi went viral for a recent livestream fail.

During the livestream, Cardi appeared to be having a great time, dancing and singing along to her hit single, but quickly turned the music off when she saw her two-year-old daughter, Kulture enter the room.

Cardi mumbled “No, no, no, no,” as she shut off the raunchy song. Then, she coyly took a sip of wine.

While some people found this incident funny (and relatable), there were a select few who didn’t.

Some haters took the video as an opportunity to call Cardi hypocritical for shielding her daughter from her own song while little kids around the world are being exposed to the NSFW lyrics.

“So ya daughter cant listen to it but everybody else’s daughter can @iamcardib?” wrote an infuriated Twitter user. “AW OKAY! Exactly what I been saying you have an agenda to push with that trash ass label your with. DISGUSTING”.

Cardi didn’t waste any time defending herself. “Ya needs to stop with this already!” Cardi wrote back. “I’m not Jojo Siwa! I don’t make music for kids, I make music for adults. Parents are responsible on what their children listen to or see. I’m a very sexual person but not around my child, just like every other parent should be.”

Cardi then went on to defend the right for mothers to be sexual while also being maternal when they want to be.

“There’s moms who are strippers. Pop pussy, twerk all night for entertainment,” she wrote. “Does that mean they do it around their kids? No! Stop making this a debate. It’s pretty much common sense.”

While some users still felt the need to drag Cardi (haters gonna hate), many of her fans came to her defense, calling out the double standards that Cardi faces as a female rapper.

“It’s always the female artist getting critique,” wrote one Twitter user. “Why people don’t talk about all the disgusting music some men be putting out?”

“This!!!” wrote another user. “Like @Eminem literally has multiple songs about murdering people but no one bats an eye about that but because it’s a female talking about her wet [cat emoji] people jump to conclusions.”

It looks like the controversy surrounding “WAP” isn’t ending any time soon. And hey, if Cardi’s motive behind the song was to spark controversy, she very much succeeded in that goal.

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