Entertainment

Eva Longoria Is Being Called Out For Dragging Former ‘Housewives’ Actors And Defending Felicity Huffman

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Earlier this year, a major college admission scandal was exposed and at the center of it was actress Felicity Huffman. Huffman was found guilty of mail fraud for paying $15,000 to increase her daughter’s SAT scores. As of now, she awaits sentencing but is expected to be given at least a month in prison for her crime.

However, before the judge announces her sentence, celebrity friends and loved ones have sent in letters of support for Huffman, asking for leniency.

Among the letters was a testimonial from her “Desperate Housewives” co-star, Eva Longoria, and it revealed some major onset drama.

Twitter / @TMZ

In the letter, Longoria called Huffman her “good friend” and recalled how welcoming the actress was to the Latina, who was new to Hollywood at the time. She also recalled her first table read where Huffman offered support to her co-star after seeing her “alone, scared, and unsure of where to go and what to do.”

Additionally, Longoria revealed that she was bullied on set by another actress. Though she didn’t divulge who the bully was, “Desperate Housewives” was plagued by drama and tension between the cast and had rumors of a feud between Teri Hatcher and the rest of the actors.

Longoria wrote, “I dreaded the days I had to go to work with that person because it was pure torture.”

In the letter, Longoria revealed that the bullying didn’t stop until Huffman intervened.

“Felicity could feel that I was riddled with anxiety even though I never complained or mentioned the abuse to anyone,” the actress said in the letter.

The letter also revealed other ways that Huffman supported Longoria during their time at “Desperate Housewives.”

Twitter / @aaron_leib

It was also revealed that Longoria was being paid less than her co-stars. According to the letter, it was Huffman’s idea to pursue renegotiations as a group so they could reach a fair conclusion.

“That did not go over too well with the others,” Longoria explained. “But Felicity stood up for me, saying it was fair because the success of the show depended on all of us, not one of us. The fight lasted weeks, but Felicity held strong and convinced everyone this was the right thing to do.”

The letter also revealed that Huffman was the only co-star that supported Longoria’s charities and special projects.

“[The other women] were all usually too busy to help, except Felicity,” she wrote. “I can’t tell you how many times she was the only one who would physically show up to help me with kids with cancer, or children with special needs.”

Though Longoria’s letter comes from a place of friendship, not everyone appreciated the actress’ support of Huffman.

Twitter / @Stephaniefishm4

Some Twitter users pointed out that Longoria’s letter shouldn’t circumvent the justice system and that Huffman’s punishment shouldn’t be lessened just because of the words of her friends and family.

Other’s mentioned the injustice that was perpetrated against a deserving student because of Huffman’s actions.

Twitter / @BarbMcQuade

In order to get her daughter into college, Huffman took a position from a deserving student who didn’t have the privilege of a parent who would buy their acceptance. Character witnesses from Huffman’s friends and family don’t negate the wrong she did to this student.

Overall, we don’t know if Longoria’s letter will help with leniency, but a lot of us still appreciate that “Desperate Housewives” tea she spilled.

Twitter / @ira

This whole college admission scandal has the makings of a novela and we’ll be sure to keep following the drama.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS7b6AZxWlQ

A Movie About The Creation Of Hot Cheetos Is Finally Happening And This Is How Eva Longoria Is Involved

Entertainment

A Movie About The Creation Of Hot Cheetos Is Finally Happening And This Is How Eva Longoria Is Involved

evalongoria / cheetos / Instagram

There is good news out of Hollywood that actress/producer Eva Longoria is set to direct a biopic about Richard Montañez, the janitor who invented Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. The beloved spicy snack will get the big-screen treatment and a Latina will be behind the story. According to Deadline, the rights to direct the film were a hot commodity as Longoria reportedly beat out multiple directors for the role. She made quite the impression on DeVon Franklin, who will produce the anticipated film under his Franklin Entertainment label when she discussed her “authentic approach” on the touching story of Richard and Judy Montañez, his wife. 

So far there are limited details about the film, which will be titled “Flamin’ Hot.” This all the information about the upcoming project currently available and maybe all the information we really need to know.  

Credit: @evalongoria / Twitter

Landing the role of the director is just another achievement for Longoria who has transitioned successfully from the front of the camera to behind it in recent years. “The Desperate Housewives” actress has had previous experience as she directed multiple episodes of Black-ish, The Mick, and Jane the Virgin. She also recently agreed to direct a Kerry Washington movie called “24/7.” 

Here are some of the reaction the film has received on social media that Longoria will be directing. It looks like some people don’t know it’s going to be a biopic not just a film about Hot Cheetos. 

Credit: @originalspin / Twitter

There has been a bit of confusion is some circles of social media who have questions about the film and what the plot will be about. Some on social media aren’t too sure about the project or don’t realize that it will be a biopic and not about the chips themselves.

“Before you joke about this, make sure you read the article and the synopsis of the film. It’s a biopic on the Latinx janitor turned inventor of Hot Cheetos, not an animated Chester Cheetah movie, and it sounds pretty amazing—and @EvaLongoria  is the right person to tell this tale” Jeff Yang tweeted in regards to criticism the announcement has received. 

Another person on Twitter talked about what the movie will mean in terms of having a Latina behind the camera getting to tell a story many may not be too familiar with. 

“Sad people I admire on Twitter have not taken time to research the facts of Richard Montañez’s story. This isn’t just a joke Cheetos movie. Diminishing the story is lowkey racist. @EvaLongoria and Lewis Colick are telling the kind of Latinx story that never seems to get made.”

The story behind Hot Cheetos is inspirational to many and is a tribute to a legend that has touched many in Latino pop culture.  

Credit: @Complex / Twitter

The film will focus on Montañez, the son of a Mexican immigrant, who came up with the idea for Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. He incorporated the various spicy flavors of his Latin background and in return created one of the most recognizable and popular snacks for Frito-Lay and impacting the food industry as a whole. 

It didn’t start out easy for Montañez who struggled to learn English growing up and eventually dropped out. He would work various jobs until he landed a position as a janitor at Frito-Lay in 1976 at the young age of 18. Montañez quickly let his presence known at the company chatting with workers and getting to learn the products. But it wasn’t until the mid-1980s when the Frito-Lay’s CEO, Roger Enrico, told every employee to “act like an owner” in an effort to help create a new company culture. 

One day when Montañez was working alongside a fellow Frito-Lay salesman on their way to a liquor store in a Latino neighborhood, he made notice that the majority of the chips lacked flavor. He took some chips from the factory home and decided to add chile powder to them and would pitch the idea to the CEO. Enrico loved the chips instantly and the rest would be history. 

The “Hot Cheetos” film was announced by Fox Searchlight back in February 2018 but it took until this week to get any new update on the project. We can only speculate who will be cast or when the film will be released but for now, we can take comfort knowing a Latina will be at the helm. 

READ: Latinos Stole The Show At Last Night’s VMAs: Here’s Everything You Need To Know About The Event

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Entertainment

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña may be two of Hollywood’s biggest Mexican-American stars, but now they can add teaching to their long list of experience.

You’re probably thinking, neta? Yes, really! Okay, well, technically…

Longoria and Peña, who are starring in this summer’s live-action Dora the Explorer film as Dora’s mother and father respectively, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, sat down with Vanity Fair to teach us (and test their own knowledge) Mexican slang. Whether you’re Mexican or not, you’ve probably heard a few of these classic phrases floating around. For example, “no manches,” which Peña explains has a lot of different definitions depending on the context, but generally translates to “get out of here” or “shut up” when responding to something that’s surprising or you just can’t believe. But these two can definitely explain it better than I can.

The definition and use of terms such as chicano, pedo, chamba, naco, among a ton of others are also broken down by the Dora and the Lost City of Gold actors in this hilarious video.

Now, be honest, how many of these do you use on a daily basis? Or how many did you have no idea what they actually meant?

The 44-year-old Corpus Christi native and the 43-year-old Chicago-born Narcos: Mexico actor aren’t the first to be recruited by Vanity Fair to teach us Mexican slang. In 2017, while on a press run for her film How to Be a Latin Lover, Salma Hayek sat in the tutorial hot seat to challenge others in the art of Mexican slang. The 52-year-old actress, who was born in Mexico, listed a few of the same phrases as shared by Longoria and Peña, but also explained the meaning behind several expressions such as “no mames,” “hombres malos,” “eso que ni que,” “tienes feria,” and “me vale madres.”

I think it’s safe to say that Salma Hayek taught us a lot of important ones here, amirite?

With Peña and Longoria’s new film, it’s probably important to become acquainted with a few of these phrases—Dora is, after all, an iconic Latina character. And the latest live-action movie features a number of Mexican and Mexican-American actors (Peña, Longoria, Eugenio Derbez, Danny Trejo, Adriana Barraza Isela Vega), so who knows if some of these terms will make their way to this big screen debut.

Based on Nickelodeon’s highly popular educational pre-school series, Dora the ExplorerDora and the Lost City of Gold follows a teenaged Dora (played by Isabela Moner) as she heads off to high school—which just might be her biggest and most challenging adventure yet. The quirky fun film sends Dora off on a mission to track down her parents, who are in need of saving, and enlists the help of her friends, including her primo Diego (played by Jeff Wahlberg) and monkey Boots. Along the way, she comes across familiar faces, like Swiper the Fox (voiced by Benicio del Toro)—who remembers the catchphrase, swiper no swiping?—while also trying to solve the mystery behind a lost Incan civilization.

The character of Dora the Explorer has played such an important role for Latino and non-Latino children alike.

Ok, so perhaps not teaching them Mexican slang like our friends Eva Longoria, Michael Peña and Salma Hayek, but most definitely teaching them Spanish. That was the case for one of those behind this new live-action take on Dora.

“My daughter knows Spanish because of Dora,” Dora and the City of Gold director James Bobin told the Los Angeles Times. “When she was little, I remember saying to her once, ‘What’s your favorite animal?’ And she said, ‘Ardilla.’ And I went, ‘A deer?’ and got a picture from a book of a deer. And she goes, ‘No, no, no, no, ardilla’ and pointed out the window [because] ardilla in Spanish is squirrel.”

And like its cartoon counterpart, Dora and the City of Gold hopes to appeal to all audiences. “The beautiful thing of the story is that thematically, it’s pretty universal,” Eva Longora said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “I think everybody’s going to understand it and relate to it. You don’t have to be Latino, but it is a celebration of our culture within the movie. Our language is in it, people who [reflect] our community are in it, it’s organically Latino. It wasn’t like ‘Insert Latino here.’ ”

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is in theaters everywhere August 9.