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If You’ve Never Cried While Listening To These Emotional Sin Bandera Lyrics Are You Even Human

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Sin Bandera literally translates as “Without a flag.” During the early 2000s, this Mexican duo made up by musical virtuosos Leonel García, and Noel Schajris had its share of hits and became a common feature in pop music throughout Latin America and Spain. Hits like “Sirena” (you listen to it once and it just sticks to your brain like chicle) led them to collaborate with the likes of Camila, Alex Syntek, and Presuntos Implicados, big names in pop music from those years. The duo also wrote songs for Mexican telenovelas, which helped Leonel and Noel reach wider audiences. 

Sin Bandera wrote lyrics that were both simple and quite universal. Using the common themes of pop music (lost love, regret, and good old-fashioned infatuation), they composed power ballads and lively songs that still resonate in clubs and fiestas caseras everywhere. Here are a few of these poignant lyrics. A sufrir. 

1. “Para Alcanzarte yo voy a cruzar el mar entero / Y si hay montañas me voy a volar cruzando el cielo /Tras de tus pasos voy a descubrir el universo / Y gritaré por todo el mundo que te quiero”
From: the song “Para alcanzarte” in the album “Sin Bandera”(2002)
Ideal for when: you wanna make things crystal clear to your crush

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

Basically a song about doing whatever it takes to be with someone. Because, yes, love is sometimes a hazardous journey. Bring out the tequila. 

2. “Mientes tan bien, / que me sabe a verdad / todo lo que me das / y ya te estoy amando / mientes tan bien  / que he llegado a imaginar / que en mi amor llenas tu piel / y aunque todo es de papel /mientes tan bien”
From: the song “Mientes tan bien” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you are really, pero really ardido

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

One thing that Latino musicians are really good at is making despair poetic. This rola is about a dude who realizes his loved one has been lying all along. Maybe he deserved it. 

3. “No, claro que sé perder / No será la primera vez / Hoy te vas tú, mañana me iré yo”
From: the song “Un buen perdedor” in the album Pasado (2006)
Ideal for when: you have no other choice but to let a loved one go

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

The classic Franco De Vita ballad gets the Sin Bandera treatment. A philosophical pop song that is quite rare: someone accepting defeat in the cruel world of chivalry. 

4. “En silencio siempre me hace pensar que yo te amo / Siempre con la fuerza de un mar / Este amor intenso que me vuelve a golpear / Vuelve tu piel a brillar / Vuelven esas manos a hacerme temblar”
From: the song “Y más te amo” in the album Una Última Vez (2016)
Ideal for when: you gather the courage to declarar amor eterno

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

Love is a carnal experience, and this song makes it clear: it hurts and it makes your body react in unexpected ways. 

5. “Hoy el aire huele a ti / A complicidad / A hierba fresca y besos / A pasión y obscuridad”
From: the song “Hoy el aire huele a ti” in the album Pasado (2006)
Ideal for when: a lover’s presence lingers for days

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

This is one of Sin Bandera’s sexiest lyrics: an evocative song about the trace that lovers leave behind in our beds, bodies, and souls. 

6. “En ésta no, / No coinciden nuestros universos, /Ni podemos escribir un verso, /Que describa nuestro amor”
From: the song “En ésta no” in the album Una Última Vez (2016)
Ideal for when: there is nothing left to fight for

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

A painful song about unattainable love. What makes it super sad is the fact that the lovers realize that there is nothing they can do, they just won’t get a break and be allowed to be together. 

7. “Deja que mi alma se empape de ti / Y sentirás fuego /Cuando te fundas en mí”
From: the song “No neguemos el amor” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: passion overtakes you

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

A not so subtle invitation to be sinful in the Biblical sense. 

8. “No por favor / Mucho dolor / Me da terror / Lo que llamas amor”
From: the song “Lo que llamas amor” in the album Mañana (2005)
Ideal for when: you just know a person is toxic for you

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

We have all met someone who is not the best for us, but is nevertheless very attractive, like a carnivorous plant. Well, this song is about the illogical and dangerous nature of fatal attraction. 

9. “Women are the magic in the world, / porque piensan con el corazón. / Women have the magic in the world, / por convertir en alegría todo su dolor.”
From: the song “Magia” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you celebrate the fact that women should rule the world

Credit: SonyMusicColombia / Giphy

Because any poet needs to celebrate the awesomeness of women… this is Sin Bandera’s bilingual ode to all that is female. 

10. “Eres sirena / Oigo tu canto y me ahogo en tu cadera / Por que tu vuelvas yo daría lo que fuera / Porque me quites con tu piel / esta condena que me mata y me envenena”
From: the song “Sirena” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: you have just fallen head over heels over someone

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

A silly but catchy song that just stays with you days and weeks after you heard it. Like Homer in the Odyssey (well, perhaps not as intensely), Sin Bandera sings to the mythical creatures. 

11. “Si me besas una vez, pongo el mundo a tus pies / Por tus labios pierdo la razón / Si me besas dos o tres / Mil estrellas bajaré / No hay medidas para el corazón. / Si me besas una vez, yo vuelvo a nacer”
From: the song “Si me besas” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: you think you fell in love at first sight

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

One of Sin Bandera’s themes is love at first sight, the capacity to identify something in a person that makes them unique. This song is about the life-changing power that a first kiss can have. 

12. “Ves que mi amor es tu amor / Que tu ausencia es dolor / Que es amargo el sabor si no estas /Si te vas y no regresas nunca más”
From: the song “Ves” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: you realize that tu amorcito is def not coming back

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

There is a moment that everyone who has gone through a breakup knows all about: the instant in which you realize it is all lost. This song captures it beautifully. 

13. “Frío, es un lío, hay mañanas en que estás perdido / Sientes todo un poco vacío y quieres escapar / Triste, estas triste y no entiendes qué fue lo que hiciste / Hay días así, estoy para ti verás que juntos podemos salir”
From: the song “Canción para los días lluviosos” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you know you were un pendejo but can’t get yourself to admit it

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

We all screw up even if we don’t realize it at first, right?

14. “Y ayudarme en la lectura / de las frases de tu piel  / y acentuarme en la ternura y el placer”
From: the song “ABC” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: your poetic soul is about to come out

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

The body is a book, and love-making is poetry…. cheesy but memorable, o no?

15. “Puede ser algo mágico, enigmático, fuera de control, /Rutinario y colérico, algo histérico, grande como el sol. /. Puede ser algo tímido, problemático, lleno de pasión, /Temerario y fantástico, algo único, como nuestro amor.”
From: the song “Puede ser” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you are feeling poetic but kitschy

This collaboration with Presuntos Implicados is fast-paced and basically contains all the cliches that make pop music so great and universal. More, please?

If you want to get emotional with Sin Bandera and Camila in Las Vegas this Cinco de Mayo, click this link here to purchase your tickets!

READ: Miguel Was Once A Preacher And Then He Discovered The Power Of His Own Music

Mexico Tells The US There Will Be No ‘Safe Third Country’ Agreement And Here’s What That Means For Migrants

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Mexico Tells The US There Will Be No ‘Safe Third Country’ Agreement And Here’s What That Means For Migrants

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Over the summer, Trump came down hard on Mexico and other Central American nations in an effort to make his base happy by reducing migration to the US. He threatened to slap tariffs on billions of dollars worth of Mexican goods bound for the US unless Mexico did more to stem the flow of migrants making their way to the US border.

Mexico agreed and implemented several of their own inhumane policies targeting migrants and deployed a new national guard force to its southern border with Guatemala. Now, as apprehensions at the US-Mexico border have dropped, the US is still pushing for a ‘safe third country’ agreement with Mexico. And Mexico is saying no thank you!

Mexico’s Foreign Minister rejected calls for a ‘safe third country’ deal because other policies are already working.

Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard said that Mexico doesn’t need to take any new measures to reduce the number of undocumented migrants bound for the U.S. because the current strategy is proving successful.

Ebrard said Mexico’s efforts have reduced undocumented migration from Central America by 70% and that he expects the trend to be irreversible. Ebrard said he also told Trump that a Safe Third Country agreement, which would make refugees apply for asylum in Mexico before the U.S. and has been sought by acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, doesn’t have support from Mexico’s Senate nor president.

The Foreign Minister led a Mexican delegation on Tuesday for meetings at the White House that included a brief conversation with President Donald Trump. Ebrard said that he explained the importance of the steps Mexico has taken since June, including the deployment of the National Guard, and also expressed concern about guns flowing south from the U.S.

Even Trump himself had praise for the ‘progress’ being made by Mexico.

Trump took to Twitter to tout the major decline in apprehensions at the Southern Border. Of course, in typical Trump fashion, he claimed credit for the decrease. Trump had threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods bound for the US back in June, unless Mexico played a more active role in preventing migrants from reaching the US border.

Since then, Mexico has bolstered its immigration enforcement, deploying newly formed National Guards units and other officials to its southern border with Guatemala. The government there has also worked with U.S. officials as the Trump administration expands the controversial “Remain in Mexico” program

A ‘safe third country’ agreement, like the ones agreed to by Guatemala and Honduras would put migrant’s lives at an even greater risk.

Although the two countries don’t have a safe third country agreement in place, Trump’s ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy is effectively the same thing.

A statement from Pence’s office after Tuesday’s meeting said the nations agreed to implement “to the fullest extent possible” the Migrant Protection Protocols, also known as “Remain in Mexico.” More than 42,000 non-Mexican migrants have been sent to Mexico to wait weeks or months for their U.S. legal processes since the program began in January, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Human rights advocates say this makes them vulnerable to the violence that plagues many of the cities on Mexico’s northern border.

And, meanwhile, the US court system has allowed the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy to resume for migrants who cross into New Mexico and Texas.

The Ninth Circuit court has temporarily lifted a nationwide injunction against President Donald Trump’s effort to deny asylum to immigrants who enter the U.S. after passing through another country.

The ruling basically lifted the injunction that was put in place blocking Trump’s expansion of the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy. Now, with this ruling, Trump can expand his policy to the border states outside the Ninth Circuit’s jurisdiction – New Mexico and Texas.

One of the central arguments against safe third country agreements, is that it creates extra pressures on governments already struggling to help refugees.

Many experts say that Guatemala and Mexico lack the resources to handle so many asylum claims and point to State Department warnings that asylum seekers are at risk of violence in both countries. Many also say that such agreements don’t address the root causes that push people to flee and may just encourage them to find different routes to the United States.

Crimes against migrants largely go unsolved and unpunished.

The State Department’s own advisory for Tamaulipas (a state where migrants are returned to under the ‘Remain in Mexico policy) warns against all travel here. “Federal and state security forces have limited capability to respond to violence in many parts of the state,” it says.

“For us, for everyone, it’s very dangerous,” agreed Pastor Aarón Méndez Ruiz, who runs the Casa del Migrante Amar, a shelter in Nuevo Laredo.

Migrants have long been frequent targets of crime here. The risks are high enough that rather than let Mexican deportees walk from the border bridge to the state migrant reception center nearby, officials transport them in vans.

Criminals were making such easy prey of migrants coming and going from one migrant shelter that the federal police posted a permanent, round-the-clock sentry across the street.

Hoping To Stop The Drug War, Mexico’s President Asks Drug Cartel Leaders To ‘Think Of Your Mother’

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Hoping To Stop The Drug War, Mexico’s President Asks Drug Cartel Leaders To ‘Think Of Your Mother’

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Mexico President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador came out with an appeal recently to the country’s cartels to think about their mamás. And, if we’re really honest, it almost sounded like the kind of lecture we’d suffer from our own mamás if we decided to act up. But, unlike the earful we get from our mamás, it seems unlikely that Lopez Obrador’s speech is going to create the guilt trip it needs to, in order to get Mexico’s cartels to clean up their act.

Okay, tell us what AMLO’s impression of a mamá-lecture sounds like.

Instagram / @bbeatrizgm

During what was a relatively routine kind of visit at the Tula rural hospital in southwestern Tamaulipas on Saturday, Lopez Obrador commented on recent gang violence. “They are in the wrong, it shouldn’t be like this, I call on them to find other things to do, to think about themselves, their families, their mothers: they know how much their mothers suffer because of the sublime love they have for their children, and they need to think about that,” he said to the locals.

But to be fair, it’s not all the President said.

Pinterest / Eaiara

And, okay, he didn’t just say that and then that was the end of it. Lopez Obrador’s comments were part of a larger statement about crime and violence in the state of Tamaulipas. While he didn’t make any specific statements about what and whose violence he found most concerning, it was implied that the biggest challenge on the horizon has appeared in the form of the Cartel del Noreste – a splinter group formed from the Los Zetas cartel. “To hell with crime,” Lopez Obrador said. “It’s gross! Disgusting!”

So what’s the Cartel del Noreste been doing that’s got everyone so worked up?

Instagram / @mttbrogan

It was only a week ago reports had surfaced that gas stations towards the north of Tamaulipas were refusing to fill the tanks of army and police vehicles. The reason? Cartel del Noreste had threatened to attack any service stations that sold gas to the military and police. At the time of writing, the debacle is being investigated as a criminal case of refusal of service, with authorities seeking to address the issue without punishing the gas stations themselves.

Recently, cartels have stepped up their violent attacks – including ones on the police and military.

Instagram / @mexicanspecialforces

The incident is only the latest that’s come from the cartels operating in the area. In fact, gang members have been responsible for direct attacks on army bases and patrols. It’s not uncommon for the cartels to wear counterfeit military uniforms, travel in large convoys, drive armored trucks and even redirect traffic, mimicking military activity. Believe it or not, in some areas of Tamaulipas, the cartels have set up their own surveillance systems in the streets in order to monitor the activities of local officials. Ultimately, while it’s great to see Lopez Obrador publicly putting his voice behind the authorities, gang activity has become considerably sophisticated

Surely AMLO doesn’t think that his speech is going to make that much of a difference to what’s been happening?

Instagram / @revolucionmorena

At this stage, it’s a little late in the piece to start lecturing gang members on their activities, and bringing their mothers, of all people, into the conversation. If the cartels were that concerned about the effect their illicit activities were going to have on their mamás, then they wouldn’t be involved in the scene in the first place. And in all frankness, it’s more likely that the gang members stay in the cartels because they would be more afraid of retribution from gangs for trying to leave, than potential punishment from the government, should they choose to stay.

Many feel the President was trying to make a point that his administration doesn’t condone crime.

Instagram / @razielsforza

Unfortunately, it would seem that Lopez Obrador is most likely making these comments to try and drive home the message that his administration doesn’t condone crime. It was only a few days beforehand that he was publicly talking about how the current administration has eliminated corruption within the government … since he’s come under fire for not doing enough to lower the crime rate in Mexico. However, it is worth noting that part of the reason why authorities are having issues cracking down on gang violence is because of the threat of violence against the officials friends and loved ones. And, of course, the kind of stunts that see businesses refusing to deal with authorities for fear of attracting attention from the likes of Cartel de Noreste. 

In the grand scheme of things, though, it is vital that gang violence be addressed within Mexico – and not just for the sanity of the locals. After all, plenty of places around Mexico are now responsible for holding asylum seekers while they wait to have their case heard by the US judicial system. The rise in gang violence is not only threatening the safety of Mexicans, but refugees alike.