Entertainment

If You’ve Never Cried While Listening To These Emotional Sin Bandera Lyrics Are You Even Human

Sin Bandera literally translates as “Without a flag.” During the early 2000s, this Mexican duo made up by musical virtuosos Leonel García, and Noel Schajris had its share of hits and became a common feature in pop music throughout Latin America and Spain. Hits like “Sirena” (you listen to it once and it just sticks to your brain like chicle) led them to collaborate with the likes of Camila, Alex Syntek, and Presuntos Implicados, big names in pop music from those years. The duo also wrote songs for Mexican telenovelas, which helped Leonel and Noel reach wider audiences. 

Sin Bandera wrote lyrics that were both simple and quite universal. Using the common themes of pop music (lost love, regret, and good old-fashioned infatuation), they composed power ballads and lively songs that still resonate in clubs and fiestas caseras everywhere. Here are a few of these poignant lyrics. A sufrir. 

1. “Para Alcanzarte yo voy a cruzar el mar entero / Y si hay montañas me voy a volar cruzando el cielo /Tras de tus pasos voy a descubrir el universo / Y gritaré por todo el mundo que te quiero”
From: the song “Para alcanzarte” in the album “Sin Bandera”(2002)
Ideal for when: you wanna make things crystal clear to your crush

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

Basically a song about doing whatever it takes to be with someone. Because, yes, love is sometimes a hazardous journey. Bring out the tequila. 

2. “Mientes tan bien, / que me sabe a verdad / todo lo que me das / y ya te estoy amando / mientes tan bien  / que he llegado a imaginar / que en mi amor llenas tu piel / y aunque todo es de papel /mientes tan bien”
From: the song “Mientes tan bien” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you are really, pero really ardido

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

One thing that Latino musicians are really good at is making despair poetic. This rola is about a dude who realizes his loved one has been lying all along. Maybe he deserved it. 

3. “No, claro que sé perder / No será la primera vez / Hoy te vas tú, mañana me iré yo”
From: the song “Un buen perdedor” in the album Pasado (2006)
Ideal for when: you have no other choice but to let a loved one go

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

The classic Franco De Vita ballad gets the Sin Bandera treatment. A philosophical pop song that is quite rare: someone accepting defeat in the cruel world of chivalry. 

4. “En silencio siempre me hace pensar que yo te amo / Siempre con la fuerza de un mar / Este amor intenso que me vuelve a golpear / Vuelve tu piel a brillar / Vuelven esas manos a hacerme temblar”
From: the song “Y más te amo” in the album Una Última Vez (2016)
Ideal for when: you gather the courage to declarar amor eterno

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

Love is a carnal experience, and this song makes it clear: it hurts and it makes your body react in unexpected ways. 

5. “Hoy el aire huele a ti / A complicidad / A hierba fresca y besos / A pasión y obscuridad”
From: the song “Hoy el aire huele a ti” in the album Pasado (2006)
Ideal for when: a lover’s presence lingers for days

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

This is one of Sin Bandera’s sexiest lyrics: an evocative song about the trace that lovers leave behind in our beds, bodies, and souls. 

6. “En ésta no, / No coinciden nuestros universos, /Ni podemos escribir un verso, /Que describa nuestro amor”
From: the song “En ésta no” in the album Una Última Vez (2016)
Ideal for when: there is nothing left to fight for

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

A painful song about unattainable love. What makes it super sad is the fact that the lovers realize that there is nothing they can do, they just won’t get a break and be allowed to be together. 

7. “Deja que mi alma se empape de ti / Y sentirás fuego /Cuando te fundas en mí”
From: the song “No neguemos el amor” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: passion overtakes you

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

A not so subtle invitation to be sinful in the Biblical sense. 

8. “No por favor / Mucho dolor / Me da terror / Lo que llamas amor”
From: the song “Lo que llamas amor” in the album Mañana (2005)
Ideal for when: you just know a person is toxic for you

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

We have all met someone who is not the best for us, but is nevertheless very attractive, like a carnivorous plant. Well, this song is about the illogical and dangerous nature of fatal attraction. 

9. “Women are the magic in the world, / porque piensan con el corazón. / Women have the magic in the world, / por convertir en alegría todo su dolor.”
From: the song “Magia” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you celebrate the fact that women should rule the world

Credit: SonyMusicColombia / Giphy

Because any poet needs to celebrate the awesomeness of women… this is Sin Bandera’s bilingual ode to all that is female. 

10. “Eres sirena / Oigo tu canto y me ahogo en tu cadera / Por que tu vuelvas yo daría lo que fuera / Porque me quites con tu piel / esta condena que me mata y me envenena”
From: the song “Sirena” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: you have just fallen head over heels over someone

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

A silly but catchy song that just stays with you days and weeks after you heard it. Like Homer in the Odyssey (well, perhaps not as intensely), Sin Bandera sings to the mythical creatures. 

11. “Si me besas una vez, pongo el mundo a tus pies / Por tus labios pierdo la razón / Si me besas dos o tres / Mil estrellas bajaré / No hay medidas para el corazón. / Si me besas una vez, yo vuelvo a nacer”
From: the song “Si me besas” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: you think you fell in love at first sight

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

One of Sin Bandera’s themes is love at first sight, the capacity to identify something in a person that makes them unique. This song is about the life-changing power that a first kiss can have. 

12. “Ves que mi amor es tu amor / Que tu ausencia es dolor / Que es amargo el sabor si no estas /Si te vas y no regresas nunca más”
From: the song “Ves” in the album Sin Bandera (2002)
Ideal for when: you realize that tu amorcito is def not coming back

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

There is a moment that everyone who has gone through a breakup knows all about: the instant in which you realize it is all lost. This song captures it beautifully. 

13. “Frío, es un lío, hay mañanas en que estás perdido / Sientes todo un poco vacío y quieres escapar / Triste, estas triste y no entiendes qué fue lo que hiciste / Hay días así, estoy para ti verás que juntos podemos salir”
From: the song “Canción para los días lluviosos” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you know you were un pendejo but can’t get yourself to admit it

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

We all screw up even if we don’t realize it at first, right?

14. “Y ayudarme en la lectura / de las frases de tu piel  / y acentuarme en la ternura y el placer”
From: the song “ABC” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: your poetic soul is about to come out

Credit: sinbandera / Instagram

The body is a book, and love-making is poetry…. cheesy but memorable, o no?

15. “Puede ser algo mágico, enigmático, fuera de control, /Rutinario y colérico, algo histérico, grande como el sol. /. Puede ser algo tímido, problemático, lleno de pasión, /Temerario y fantástico, algo único, como nuestro amor.”
From: the song “Puede ser” in the album De viaje (2003)
Ideal for when: you are feeling poetic but kitschy

This collaboration with Presuntos Implicados is fast-paced and basically contains all the cliches that make pop music so great and universal. More, please?

If you want to get emotional with Sin Bandera and Camila in Las Vegas this Cinco de Mayo, click this link here to purchase your tickets!

READ: Miguel Was Once A Preacher And Then He Discovered The Power Of His Own Music

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Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Culture

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Over the last few years, Mexico has been updated its currency to make it more secure from counterfeiters and to highlight the country’s diverse history. One of the country’s newest bills is a $100 peso note featuring a 17th-Century female historical figure and it’s winning major international awards for its design and history.

Mexico’s $100-peso bill has been named banknote of the year for 2020 by the International Bank Note Society (IBNS). As printer and issuer of the note, the Bank of México beat 24 other nominees to the award, and the Sor Juana bill led the way from the start of the voting process.

The note features national heroine Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, with the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve on its reverse.

In its announcement the IBNS wrote: “Mexico’s award-winning entry may provide a template as other countries reconsider how they design and promote new banknotes.  The successful design in eye-pleasing red combines Hispanic architecture, a famous female Hispanic literary figure and a tribute to the world’s fragile ecosystem.”

Past bank note of the year recipients include Aruba, Canada, Uganda, the Faroe Islands, two time winner Switzerland and three time winner Kazakhstan, among others.

So who was Sor Juana and why was she important to Mexico?

Born in 1651, Sor Juana was a self-educated nun and intellectual renowned for her poetry, writing and political activism, who criticized the misogyny of colonial Mexico.

Beginning her studies at a young age, Sor Juana was fluent in Latin and also wrote in Nahuatl, and became known for her philosophy in her teens. Sor Juana educated herself in her own library, which was mostly inherited from her grandfather. After joining a nunnery in 1667, Sor Juana began writing poetry and prose dealing with such topics as love, feminism, and religion.

Mexico was up against 24 other countries in the nomination process.

In second place was Kate Cranston who appears on the Bank of Scotland’s 20 pound note. The businesswoman appears on the obverse and she is recognized for being the owner of the famous tea rooms inaugurated in 1903 and that today are a tourist attraction.

In third place there was a triple tie between the 20 pound note of the Ulster Bank of Northern Ireland whose design features flora and buskers. The one from the Bahamas of 5 dollars with the image of the junkanoo dancer, and the one of 50 dollars from Fiji.

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Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Things That Matter

Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Residents of one Mexican city have taken to the streets to demand justice for a local stray dog who was brutally killed in an axe attack last month. Video of the incident was uploaded to social media and quickly went viral, leading to large protests in the Sinaloan city of Los Mochis.

Hundreds marched in Los Mochis to seek justice for a dog killed by man with an axe.

Hundreds took to the streets in Los Mochis, Sinaloa to demand justice for Rodolfo, a mixed breed dog killed with an axe on March 21. They showed banners that read “Justice for Rodolfo & for all who have no voice,” “We won’t stop until we have justice,” and “Justice for Rodolfo,” among others.

Despite the COVID-19 regulations, the participants in this new march, children, women and men, calmly marched through the center of the city of Los Mochis to make it clear that they are against animal cruelty and demanded justice for Rodolfo, who was a local stray dog. The demonstration gained traction after a video of the attack on Rodolfo, also known by Heart, Pirate and Shorty, was uploaded onto social media.

The predominantly young crowd marched to the state prosecutor’s office where environmental activist Arturo Islas Allende delivered a criminal complaint. Many brought their pets to the march and carried placards demanding the killer be sentenced to prison. One placard read: “Justice for Rodolfo and for all those that don’t have a voice.”

The suspected attacker, José “M,” a student at a Sinaloa university, has already delivered a preparatory statement to officials. Islas Allende questioned the morality of the killer. “We don’t want a psychopath like him as our neighbor,” he said.

The suspect’s girlfriend claimed that he killed the dog to protect her.

The girlfriend of the alleged attacker took to social media in his defense, saying the dog had attacked her days earlier and injured her face and hands.

On her Facebook account she claimed that medical treatments for her injuries had cost 8,000 pesos (US $400) and uploaded photographs of the injuries caused by the dog’s bites.

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