Entertainment

Remember All Those El General Hits From Back In The Day? He Says The Devil Made Him Do It

You can definitely call Panamanian rapper El General a pioneer of reggaetón music.

Credit: Joel Aliaga / YouTube

Before Daddy Yankee, Don Omar and Wisin & Yandel, El General dropped ??? tracks such as the 1991 dance hit “Muevelo, Muevelo.”

Although it his music was more reggae than reggaetón, his influence is undeniable. Remember this one?!

Via: Michael Ellis / YouTube

We have no idea what “tu pum pum” means but never really stopped to think about it because the song is so damn good.

It’s like El General had the exact formula for a catchy song that would instantly get people on the dance floor. Was it something in his DNA, or perhaps he was a child prodigy of reggaetón? That must be it, right?

El General explains that the reason he produced such intense dance music was because of the devil!

CREDIT: Giphy

Que?!!

Edgardo Armando Franco, known to the world as El General, is now a 47-year-old Jehovah’s Witness who says he was influenced by “bad company.”

“When I was young, I had dreams of becoming a famous singer, but I knew the truth,” Franco said to El Nuevo Dia. “What happened was that I didn’t remove those dreams from my heart and I began to listen to these bad influences.”

He goes on to say that the lyrics caused him great conflict, but after a few drinks, he went ahead and recorded the now-famous songs.

Those songs played everywhere on the radio,” Franco said. “That was a victory for satan.”

Well, in that case, we’d like to say thank you to el diablo because we’ll always have this beauty:

Via: farradegaraje / YouTube

H/T: Remezcla

READ: This Puerto Rican Rapper is So Confident in His Skills, He Doesn’t Need a Stage Name

Did you like El General back in the day? Share this story and comment in the section below!

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These Are The Latin Artists That Dominated VEVO’s Most Watched Lists For 2020

Entertainment

These Are The Latin Artists That Dominated VEVO’s Most Watched Lists For 2020

Medusa – Universal Music Group

It’s official: 2020 was the year that Latin artists truly dominated worldwide music and video charts. Despite the drama and pain of 2020, Latin artists were busy bringing their talent to so many of us who needed an escape from the constant reminders of what an unprecedented year 2020 was.

From Bad Bunny’s three albums in one year to J Balvin’s highly-ambitious Colores album, and the top-charting collab between Dua Lipa and Bad Buny, Tainy, and J Balvin in “Un Dia,” we had some serious bops this year.

Along with all this incredible music, we also got served some visually-stunning music videos – which, globally, were also dominated by Latin artists.

Vevo has revealed the top 10 most-watched artists and music videos of 2020.

One of the first things that pops out on this list, is the fact that four out of ten of the artists are Latinos. In fact, the number one spot is claimed by Colombia’s own J Balvin!

Karol G rocketed up the charts this year to the number two spot while Maluma (#5) and Shakira (#8) round off the list. Perhaps most shockingly, is the fact that Bad Bunny didn’t crack the top ten, considering so many of his albums were chart toppers this year.

Vevo also broke down the top Latinx videos of 2020.

J Balvin truly dominated the music video scene of 2020. Out of Vevo’s top ten videos by Latin artists, he is featured in half of them. From his own track “Rojo” off his Colores album to collabs with Dua Lipa, Bad Bunny, and Tainy on “Un Día” to the number one spot with Jhay Cortez and Anuel AA in “Medusa,” J Balvin had an incredible 2020.

Here’s a roundup – for your viewing pleasure – of the top music videos of 2020 by Latino artists.

Medusa – Jhay Cortez, Anuel AA, J Balvin

This track claimed the number one spot on Vevo’s “Most Watched Latin Videos” of 2020. And it’s easy to see why. Not only is it a great song, but the video features three of Latin musics top artists.

Agua – Tainy, J Balvin

Although “Agua” came in at number two on the Most Watched Latin Videos in the U.S. (with 26 million views), it also performed incredible worldwide. In fact, “Agua” received more than 479 million views worldwide, earning it the number four spot globally.

Hawái – Maluma

Maluma’s video for “Hawái” actually came in at number three on the worldwide list, garnering more than half a billion views! This earns him the number one spot among Latin artists on the worldwide circuit.

Ay, Dios Mío! – Karol G

Karol G truly rocketed to the top of the charts this year and although it’s surprising that “Tusa” didn’t make the cut (perhaps since it’s from 2019), she had two videos on this year’s lists.

First, “Ay, Dios Mío” charted at number 4 in the U.S. with more than 18 million views but it was also her top-performing video around the world as it came in at number seven globally with more than 307 million views.

Un Día – Dua Lipa, Tainy, Bad Bunny, J Balvin

Although “Un Día” failed to chart globally on the Vevo list, it earned the number five spot by Latin artists in the U.S. with more than 16 million views.

Se Me Olvidó – Christian Nodal

Another interesting thing of the Vevo list is the presence of Christian Nodal who made the cut with “Se Me Olvidó (La Canción Del Avión)”, which puts Mexican Regional music high on the countdown among mostly dembow specialists.

Favorito – Camilo

Another track that performed exceptionally well around the world, Camilo’s track “Favorito,” was viewed 13.2 million times in the U.S., earning the artist the number seven spot. But when it came to global views, “Favorito” was viewed 359 million times!

Camilo earned another top spot (#6) on the global list with his track “Vida de Rico.”

Me Gusta – Shakira, Anuel AA

This collaboration charted at number eight on Vevo’s roundup for the U.S. with more than 13 million views.

Bichota – Karol G

Her second entry on VEVO’s 2020 roundup, “Bichota” charted at number nine in the U.S. with more than 12 million views.

Rojo – J Balvin

J Balvin was all over the 2020 roundups but his track “Rojo” was his top charting video in the U.S. with more than 12 million views.

Who was on your most-watched lists of 2020?

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Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

So much of this year has been spent inside our apartments singing and dancing to Bad Bunny hits like “Safaera” and “Yo Perreo Sola” or looking through countless magazines that made him their cover boy.

It seems that 2020 is peak Bad Bunny, as the reggaetónero takes over the world bringing us hit after hit while bringing perreo into the mainstream.

Now, in his latest cover story in The Culture Issue of the New York Times, San Benito gives us insight into what his 2020 has been like, what we can expect from him in the not so distant future and what being a Puerto Rican super star means to him.

Bad Bunny is taking over the world and his latest interview with the New York Times details just how he plans to do it.

‘The World According to Bad Bunny’ – that is what graces the cover of the New York Times’ latest Culture Issue. And it catches your eye – his full face, including his now signature mustache – force you to do a double take to soak in all of his glory. Or maybe that was just my reaction…

Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio — more popularly known as Bad Bunny, San Benito, El Conejo Malo — is the reggaetónero we’ve all fallen in love with and who is topping charts throughout the world. 

His latest feature story covers everything from his love for Puerto Rico to his next album, but it’s also another major step for the artist in putting both is home and the Latino community on the world stage.

His profile begins with Bad Bunny discussing his album YHLQMDLG, which begins with the song “Si Veo a Tu Mamá”, which has a verse we can all relate to in 2020: “maldito Año Nuevo” (or “this damn new year”). But despite all the BS that 2020 has thrown our way, Bad Bunny has managed to shine through by being an advocate when it comes to so many issues.

Bad Bunny says he feels like an “athlete representing his Puerto Rico at the Olympics.“

San Benito has made it his mission to put his homeland on the map and to showcase to the world the problems that Boricuas face on the island. In the interview, Bad Bunny describes himself as an athlete representing Puerto Rico in the Olympics.

Those problems he speaks of include the island’s status as a commonwealth territory of the U.S. which means its citizens on the island cannot vote for president or have any voting representatives in Congress. 

The natural disasters of Hurricane Maria, Irma and the earthquakes that rung in 2020 also add to the laundry list of problems, and also came with little financial help from Trump’s federal government, which has left Puerto Rico in a vulnerable state to this day.

In language, Caribbean Spanish like that of Puerto Rico is heavily criticized by the so-called sophisticated Latin Americans, but they all bop their heads to Bad Bunny tunes like “Safaera,” “La Romana,” and more.

So many of us love Bad Bunny for his constant activism and he doesn’t disappoint in this NYT piece.

Bad Bunny is known for breaking cultural stereotypes, shattering boundaries others couldn’t dream of, and advocating for women. He’s even openly talked about depression, and shown the world it is okay not to feel okay.

His activism has also shown support for the trans community with the video “Yo Perreo Sola,” dressed in drag, or when he’s done public appearances wearing a skirt and a shirt that read “mataron a alexa, no a un hombre en falda.”

However, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Benito was suspiciously mute — no posts on social media, no interviews. He seemed to have disappeared at a moment that so many of us could of benefited from his compassion. Many criticized the singer for his silence.

But on June 12, a TIME article was published about him speaking out, through email exchanges, and how he did not want to just send a basic message, but rather go deeper to “support the fight against a systematic monster that’s been [around for] centuries.”

Bad Bunny also speaks out about reggaetón’s black roots – which so often go unmentioned.

Credit: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

As for inspirations, Benito called out the prominent Black stars who helped shape reggaetón into the phenomenon that is it today. He admits that’s something he’s still learning about. “As a child, for better or worse, I always lived in my bubble,” Benito says. “Now, I could say – and people do say – it’s a form of privilege. But it’s always been my way of being. Me, in my house and in my bubble, imagining a better, more magical world.”

As he ascends into the pop mainstream, Bad Bunny also opens up about returning reggaetón to its Puerto Rican roots on his album YHLQMDLG. “Since reggaetón went pop all over the world, I don’t feel like people really know the sound that raised me, that I grew up studying,” he says. “This is the album I would’ve wanted to release when I was 15 and dreamed of being a singer.” Benito also hints to the next project, adding, “My next album doesn’t have anything to do with YHLQMDLG.”

It’s a long interview but, come on, it’s with Bad Bunny so the entire interview is worth the read. You can check out the NYT piece here.

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