Entertainment

Becky G Talked About Being A Proud Mexicana And How ‘Dehumanizing’ U.S. Current Policies Are For Immigrants

Immigration is a subject that is so personal to members of the Latinidad. Even when it’s not making the daily news, the conversation around immigration is deeply prominent in our communities and homes. However, since the current administration has made immigration and deportation the main focus of their policies, it has been a constant topic discussed in homes across the world. Immigration has become THE American issue.

Seeing the separation of families, the detention of men, women, children and babies and the conditions they are forced to live in hurts. It’s stressful to see that level of human suffering. When we learn of new deaths coming out of ICE detention centers, we grieve the loss as if we’re mourning for our family. So far, our calls to abolish ICE, reunify families and release migrants have gone unanswered.

Altogether, the immigration crisis feels utterly degrading and dismal.

We aren’t the only ones who are feeling this way and, now singer Becky G is sharing her feelings about the hopelessness of the current migration situation.

Instagram / @iambeckyg

The singer spoke with HOLA! USA and opened up about her connection to her Mexican culture and what it meant to be a second-generation Latina in a world that is so full of anti-immigrant policies.

“I’ve always considered myself Latina,” Becky G claimed. “I’m 100 percent proud to be from Los Angeles, but I’m also 100 percent proud to be ‘Mexicana de corazón, de sangre.’ My grandparents have always made it a priority for us to be aware of our culture, our morals, our traditions.”

Those strong ties to her Latinidad have made her very aware of the problems impacting our community — especially the issue of immigration.

Twitter / @Hip_Latina

Like many of us, Becky G is familiar with the travesty that is happening at our southern borders. She knows the helplessness and the anger we feel when we see proof of injustices inflicted on imprisoned migrants. Despite this, the singer says the Latinx community has to continue to push against ICE’s dehumanizing policies and mistreatment.

“Some people think there’s only so much we can do,” Becky G explained to HOLA! USA. “But we have to keep pushing, keep raising awareness and keep talking about it. If not, it’s going to become normalized that there are children dying while basically being held captive, mistreated, not being taken care of properly — separated from their families. Separating families, children taking care of children, babies not having their diapers changed, people without proper food or places to sleep… to me, that’s so dehumanizing.”

The songstress went on to speak about the unity she grew up experiencing and how that togetherness helped in times of crisis.

Instagram / @iambeckyg

Like many Latinos, Becky G grew up with a big, extended family. The unity between the family members helped make life easier and more full, especially when her family experienced a dilemma of there own.

“In our family, we are so united; we are so supportive,” the singer shared. “Where one person eats, 20 can eat. Where one person can sleep, 20 can sleep. And as funny as it sounds, it’s actually very beautiful because when I was 9 years old we lost our home, and we went from house to house, from family member to family member to live there. Sharing is a big part of our culture.”

It’s this unity — a beautiful element of our culture — that we need to draw from now in order to show up for the immigrants both in our communities and in detention.

Instagram / @iambeckyg

After a weekend of mass murder, where our communities were purposely targeted, it’s easy to feel defeated, hurt and scared. Fear-mongering has turned to violence and violence has turned to death. However, we cannot allow the focused hate aimed at Latinx communities to prevent us from fighting for each other.

The only way our community is going to survive this grotesque period in US history is if we stay true to who we are. In moments like these, kindness, togetherness and unity are necessary for us to move forward. Just like Beck G, we should be amplifying the voices and experiences of those directly harmed by these racist policies. We have to rally and use our combined strength — the strength of the Latinidad — to vote, protest and fight until our detained family has been freed. We must remember that we’ll always be stronger together.

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9-Year-Old Migrant Girl Drowns While Trying to Cross the Rio Grande in the U.S.

Things That Matter

9-Year-Old Migrant Girl Drowns While Trying to Cross the Rio Grande in the U.S.

Photo via Getty Images

On March 20th, U.S. Border Patrol agents found a 9-year-old migrant girl unresponsive along with her mother and sibling on an island in the Rio Grande.

U.S. Border Patrol agents attempted to resuscitate the family. The agents were able to revive the mother and her younger, 3-year-old child. The Border Patrol agents transferred the 9-year-old migrant girl to emergency medics in emergency medics in Eagle Pass, Texas, but she remained unresponsive.

In the end, the 9-year-old migrant girl died–the cause of death being drowning.

The mother of the two children was Guatemalan while the two children were born in Mexico.

The death of the 9-year-old migrant girl is notable because this is the first migrant child death recorded in this current migration surge. And experts worry that it won’t be the last.

And while this is the first child death, it is not the only migrant who has died trying to make it across the border. On Wednesday, a Cuban man drowned while trying to swim across the border between Tijuana and San Diego. He was the second migrant to drown in just a two-week period.

Why is this happening?

According to some reports, the reason so many migrants are heading towards the U.S. right now is “because President Trump is gone”. They believe they have a better chance of claiming asylum in the U.S.

Another factor to take into consideration is that a large number of these migrants are unaccompanied minors. According to migrant services volunteer Ruben Garcia, Title 42 is actually having the opposite effect of its intent. President Trump enacted Title 42 to prevent immigration during COVID-19 for “safety reasons”.

“Families that have been expelled multiple times that are traveling with children,” Garcia told PBS News Hour. “Some of them are making the decision to send their children in by themselves, because they have families someplace in the U.S., and they know their children will be released to them.”

Is there a “border crisis”?

That depends on who you ask. According to some experts, the numbers of migrants heading to the U.S./Mexico border aren’t out-of-the-ordinary considering the time of year and the fact that COVID-19 made traveling last year virtually impossible.

According to Tom Wong of the University of California at San Diego’s U.S. Immigration Policy Center, there is no “border crisis”. “This year looks like the usual seasonal increase, plus migrants who would have come last year but could not,” Wong says.

As the Washington Post explained: “What we’re seeing right now is a predictable seasonal shift. When the numbers drop again in June and July, policymakers may be tempted to claim that their deterrence policies succeeded.”

What is the Biden Administration planning on doing about it?

As of now, it is pretty evident that the Biden Administration has not been handling this migrant surge well, despite ample warning from experts. As of now, President Biden has put Vice President Harris in charge of handling the issues at the border.

As of now, the game plan is still very vague. But in the past, the Biden Administration has stated that they plan to fix the migrant surge at the source. That means providing more aid to Central America in order to prevent further corruption of elected officials.

They also want to put in place a plan that processes children and minors as refugees in their own countries before they travel to the U.S. The government had not tested these plans and they may take years to implement. Here’s to hoping that these changes will prevent a case like the death of the 9-year-old migrant girl.

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Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

Latidomusic

Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

In honor of Women’s History Month, Latido Music has lined up 10 of our favorite all-women collaborations in Latin Music. In no particular order, here’s 10 girl-power anthems that we should be bumping all year long.

“Sin Pijama”

Mexican-American singer Becky G flipped the script on the antiquated idea that two women couldn’t get a hit together when she collaborated with Dominican reggaetonera Natti Natasha. Their fun and flirty music video for “Sin Pijama” has racked up over 1.8 billion on views on YouTube, outpacing some of top reggaetoneros. Following the success of this knockout duo, collaboration among women in Latin music has been on the rise, and we love to see it.

“Tick Tock”

Mexican pop icon Thalía has been one of the top proponents for all-women collaborations. She became the first Mexican female artist to score a billion a views on YouTube with “No Me Acuerdo” featuring Natasha. On 2018’s Valiente album, Thalía also teamed up with Argentine pop princess Lali for “Lindo Pero Bruto.” Last year, Thalía joined forces with her Latin Music Queens co-stars, fellow Mexicana Sofía Reyes and Colombian rapper Farina, for the empowering “Tick Tock.” The trio of women didn’t have time for any foolishness.

“Tusa”

Trini-American superstar Nicki Minaj got all up her in reggaeton gig on Karol G’s “Tusa.” She was even singing a bit in Spanish with the Colombian reggaetonera. Last year, Minaj had everyone, even the guys, singing, “Ahora soy una chica mala.” This was a regal bop fit for two queens and they wore that crown well. The song also garnered Minaj her first Latin Grammy nomination. That’s the power of “La Tusa.”

“No Al Aguacil”

One overlooked all-women collaboration is Mexican goddess Gloria Trevi’s “No Al Aguacil” with fellow Mexicana Paulina Rubio. The song was never released as a single (thought it should’ve been one) and it’s buried in Trevi’s 2011 album Gloria. Very much reflecting the early 2010s, “No Al Aguacil” is an electro-pop moment that these pop icons served with plenty of girl power.

“22”

In 2019, Argentine pop princess Tini came through with one of the best collaborations of the year. For kiss-off anthem “22,” she teamed up with Colombian singer Greeicy. Tini, who was turning 22 at the time, was not going to let any heartbreak rain on her birthday celebrations. Greeicy served as another voice of reason for why crying over that guy would not be worth it. This cumbiatón moment was everything.

“Santería”

Last year, Spanish star Lola Índigo recruited Mexican pop princess Danna Paola and Chilean singer Denise Rosenthal for “Santería.” Each woman adds their own flair and attitude to this bubbling pop cauldron. Like the Charmed sisters, the power of three is real here, and together these women serve a spellbinding collaboration.

“Ladrón”

Argentine pop princess Lali teamed up with Argentina’s top woman in Latin trap, Cazzu, last year. The alluring “Ladrón” was a moment of girl power that highlighted the talent in their country. The two women united in turning the tables on a no-good men. “You wanted to play me… the one that’s playing you is me,” Lali and Cazzu sang together.

“High” Remix

Last year, rising Argentine singer Maria Becerra upped the girl power of her breakthrough hit “High.” For the all-women remix, she teamed up with Índigo and her compatriot Tini. Together, they also upped the angst factor on this mesmerizing, trap-lite bop.  

“La Rueda”

Ivonne Galaz and Natalie López are making way for women in the male-dominated corridos tumbados space. As the two women signed to the Rancho Humilde record label, they teamed up for “La Rueda” on last year’s Corridos Tumbados Vol. 2 album. What a moment to hear two Mexicanas find strength in each other’s stories of overcoming the struggle. Galaz and López tap into an emotion in the genre that the guys can’t touch.

“Modo Turbo”

Three Brazilian queens joined forces for last year’s “Modo Turbo.” Anitta and Luísa Sonza aligned with drag pop superstar Pabllo Vittar. “Fasten your seatbelt / Turbo mode,” Sonza encouraged in Portuguese. They certainly took their fans for a wild ride with this fierce and stellar collaboration.  

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Read: Natti Natasha Assembles “Las Nenas” Video with Farina, Cazzu, and La Duraca

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