Entertainment

What To Know About The Doctor In Nipsey Hussle’s Reported Documentary

Close to a week after the untimely death of rapper Nipsey Hussle, interest has grown on one of his passion projects. Hussle was reportedly working on before he was killed in Los Angeles outside his Marathon clothing store. According to several reports, Hussle was working on a documentary focusing on a herbalist in Honduras who claims to have found a cure for AIDS.

Dr. Sebi is a herbalist who claimed he had found a cure for AIDS in the 1980s.

Google Trends shows a spike for the search term ‘Dr. Sebi’ in March. Related search queries include Nipsey Hussle, Dr. Sebi documentary, and Nipsey Hussle dr. sebi documentary (among others).

In case you don’t know who Dr. Sebi is, here are some fast facts to know about the herbalist that has been fascinating social media users and conspiracy theorists over the last week.

Dr. Sebi called Honduras his home.

Born Alfredo Bowman in Ilanga, Honduras, Dr. Sebi did not consider himself African Honduran, but instead referred to himself as an African in Honduras. He established the USHA Research Institute on the coast of Honduras, 15 miles from La Ceiba, Honduras. The research institute features natural springs for bathing and is now managed by his daughter Samma Bowman. It has been visited by celebs, tourists and locals looking to ail their cures with a rigorous diet and holistic healing. After some legal troubles, the institute relocated to California.

He gained both praise and notoriety for his “African Bio-Electric Cell Food Therapy”, which claimed to cure AIDS, cancer, leukemia, epilepsy and other health problems.

In part, critics were skeptical of Dr. Sebi’s ways because he was not a trained medical doctor. After marketing his products in the U.S. in the 1980s, he was charged with practicing medicine without a license. However, a jury found his not guilty because he had not prescribed medications or made diagnoses.

He was a celebrity herbalist to pop stars and entertainers.

After Dr. Sebi died in 2016 at the age of 82, the Telegraph wrote an obituary listing some of the herbalist’s former clients, including Michael Jackson, Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes, Eddie Murphy, and John Travolta.

His legal troubles followed him until his death.

Months before he died in November of 2016, in May of that year, Dr. Sebi was arrested in Honduras for having cash he couldn’t account for, and was subsequently charged with money laundering. It is reported he died while in police custody, and the AP reports the official cause of death was pneumonia.

Conspiracy theories abound on Dr. Sebi’s death.

In an article published this week by the AP, the theories surrounding Dr. Sebi’s death were once again re-visited. Some believe Dr. Sebi was killed by the government to silence his natural cures. Some go further posting that perhaps Hussle’s death was caused because he was trying to shed light on Dr. Sebi’s health claims through the documentary.

Other social media users are reminding other users to calm down on the conspiracy talk.

There is no evidence of people being cured of their ailments strictly based on Dr. Sebi’s tactics.

The documentary seems to be getting a new producer.

Despite the controversy Dr. Sebi’s methods stir up, Nick Cannon wants to make sure Dr. Sebi’s legacy lives on by honoring Hussle’s work and continuing the project for him. Cannon posted on his Instagram he will be “picking up the baton” for Nipsey Hussle and will continue his work on the documentary on Dr. Sebi.

No release date has been set for the documentary, but if Cannon finishes it, we’re sure he will also be posting it to his IG page.

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After Helping The US Catch Dozens of Criminals, This Former Drug Lord Now Faces Deportation

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After Helping The US Catch Dozens of Criminals, This Former Drug Lord Now Faces Deportation

BENICIA ALVARADO / GETTY

The U.S has a massive criminal enforcement network across the world. From Europe to Australia and across Latin America, the United States works with local governments (among others) to play the part of international police force.

This huge network has helped bring down some of the world’s largest criminal organizations. But, often times, it’s not the U.S. officers making the biggest sacrifices – it’s the criminals who join forces with the FBI or DEA as part of a plea bargain. However, those plea agreements don’t always work out in the end.

The leader of one of Honduras’ largest cartels, helped the U.S. bring down serious criminals.

USDEA / DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

According to report by VICE, Valle has a long history of helping U.S. authorities. For example, just months after her arrest, her brothers were extradited to the United States to face charges related to drug trafficking. Meanwhile in Honduras, authorities seized more than 50 properties owned by Los Valles.

Even her own son and daughter weren’t immune. Her son Gerson eventually turned himself in to U.S. authorities after years on the run thanks to his mother. And that came after her daughter was arrested on money laundering charges. Her brothers and son have all since been convicted on drug-related charges.

And although it hasn’t been confirmed, many contribute the arrest of Juan Antonio “Tony” Hernandez – a former congressman and brother of Honduras’ current president – on drug trafficking charges.

Needless to say, this woman has helped U.S. authorities aggressively pursue the dismantling of a massive drug network (along with its ties in the US) across Latin America.

Her criminal empire was especially adept at building coalitions among cartels.

Credit: @AleRyeesH / Twitter

According to court documents, Los Valles was based in Western Honduras – near the Guatemalan border. The family allegedly moved tens of thousands of kilos of cocaine every month – taking the valuable drugs from Colombia, through Honduras, and into the United States using speedboats, submarines and small airplanes

Her organization often worked together alongside Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel – formerly headed by drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzmán (now serving life in a United States prison).

As the kinder face of the organization, Valle was focused more on finances and logistics instead of violence. In fact, she was often sent to broker new relationships with the country’s criminal and business elites. Sources close to her said she also helped construct churches and gave money to charity during her time in criminal power in Honduras.

Valle was arrested on arrival in Miami by United States law enforcement back in 2014.

Credit: US Dept of Justice

Valle served four and a half years of an 11-year prison sentence and was then realeased. But shortly after being released from prison, she was picked up by ICE and sent to a detention center in Atlanta. Her asylum claim to remain in the United States was denied—a decision she is currently appealing.

Now, after more than six years helping U.S. officials – she’s facing deportation back to Honduras, and likely death.

Credit: Benicia Alvarado / Getty

Since her arrest and plea deal in 2014, Valle has been acting as a key witness for the U.S. She’s helped the government arrest some of the strongest drug lords in the region, including her own organization. If she’s sent back to Honduras – she faces an almost certain death.

“There is a hunt on right now in my country for people who collaborated and then co-operated [with law enforcement] in drug trafficking cases,” former Army Capt. Santos Rodriguez Orellana told VICE by phone from Honduras.

It’s death sentence for her,” according to Mike Vigil, a former chief of international operations at the DEA, who also spoke with VICE News.

He added: “Her chances of survival in Honduras are slim to none. Honduras is, without question, a narco state. The highest levels within the political spectrum along with the military and police are in the pockets of drug traffickers. Given the fact that she cooperated in key drug trafficking trials, she is not likely to survive in Honduras. She is going into a fiery cauldron and is definitely going to get burned.”

Her case shows why so few people see the U.S. legal system as a partner – they become disposable just like that.

Credit: US Dept. Of Justice / DEA Task Force LA

As if it wasn’t dangerous enough for Valle to return to Honduras with a network of criminals hunting for their revenge, there’s a hunt for her at the highest levels of government.

Honduras Public Prosecutor’s Office confirmed that Valle faces charges of money laundering in Honduras, and there is a warrant for her arrest. Her arrival in Honduras wont go unnoticed and being imprisoned will offer her little protection from violence.

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Seven Men Sentenced To Up To 50 Years For The Murder Of Honduran Environmental Activist Berta Caceres

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Seven Men Sentenced To Up To 50 Years For The Murder Of Honduran Environmental Activist Berta Caceres

Berta Caceres Flores / Facebook

Seven men were sentenced to up to 50 years in prison in a Honduras court on Monday for the 2016 murder of the environmental activist Berta Caceres. Four of the men, Elvin Rápalo, Henry Hernández, Edilson Duarte, and Oscar Torres Velásquez, who were identified as the hitmen hired to shoot Caceres dead in her own home, were sentenced to 34 years in prison each.

An additional 16 years and four months were handed down to them for the attempted murder of Mexican environmentalist Gustavo Castro, who was also with Caceres during the shooting. Three more prison terms of 30 years were handed down to other individuals that played a part in the murder including an officer, an ex-soldier, and a manager of the dam project that Caceres opposed. The three men reportedly paid the four gunmen $4,000 to kill Caceres because of her activism work. 

The slaying of Berta Caceres, then-45, brought international outrage and protests as she became a well-known women’s rights defender and indigenous lands rights activist. 

Caceras, a member of the Lenca indigenous community, may not have been a household name but her impact in the world of environmental rights was certainly felt. She was one of the co-founders of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras, a grassroots organization that advocates for the rights of indigenous people. Caceras gained notoriety by protesting the company Desarrollos Energeticos (DESA), which had planned to create the $50 million Agua Zarca hydroelectric dam across from the Gualcarque River. Various indigenous communities depend on the river staying clean and healthy and free-flowing to sustain their communities.

“The river is like blood running through your veins. It’s unjust. Not only is it unjust, it’s a crime to attack a river that has life, that has spirits,” Caceres told Aljazeera in 2016. 

The building of the dam would have had major impact on water, food and medicine for her Lenca people and even caused flooding. One of her successful protests included placing a roadblock that halted construction workers from reaching the dam building site. After almost 10 years of opposition, the Chinese state-owned company Sinohydro, who was jointly developing the dam project with DESA, pulled out of the project citing community resistance. 

Her activism and work in stopping the building of the dam gave Caceres notoriety and international attention. Caceres was awarded the Goldman environmental prize in 2015 for her role in preventing the building of the dam. The project was suspended shortly following her untimely death.

Authorities have connected her death directly to her activism work against the failed dam project.

The individuals behind the death of Caceres were connected to executives that were connected to DESA and the failed dam project. The reasoning behind the plotted murder was due to multiple delays and financial losses that were linked to protests that Caceres was behind. Back in November 2018, a Honduran court convicted the seven men for the attack. 

“From the outset, the path to justice has been painful, as our rights as victims have not been respected. These sentences are a start in breaking the impunity, but we’re going to make every effort to ensure that all those responsible – the company executives and state officials identified in the trial – are prosecuted,” Bertita Zúñiga, Cáceres’ second-eldest daughter, said after the men were charged on Monday. 

While Caceres’ family is happy to see some justice be delivered, Zúñiga still believes the real culprits behind her the murder still on the loose. She has previously blamed the Atala-Zablah family, a well-known Honduran business group and DESA shareholders, as the ones behind her mother’s murder. 

“This is a day of pain because the intellectual authors of my mother’s murder are still enjoying impunity,” Zuniga said to reporters. “We are not going to believe that there’s true justice until these people are in jail.”

Despite this tragedy, Zuniga is not letting her mother’s legacy go to waste.

The message that Caceres spread of protecting indigenous communities still lives on according to her daughter, who continues to do similar work. She is committed to keeping her mother’s legacy alive and remembers her for the amazing impact she had on marginalized communities around the globe. 

“I remember her as a hardworking person. But I also remember her with a big smile on her face, because I believe that this struggle cannot be just to martyrize ourselves. We fight with joy and hope because if we do not, more than half of the struggle is lost,” Zúñiga told EarthJustice. “We always say that the image of my mother multiplied because we found her present in the struggle of so many women from so many communities who continue to fight very hard.

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