Entertainment

These Children Slayed Their Performances On National TV And They’re Everything

These kids might all be under 13 years old at the time of their performances on these talent competitions, but their abilities belie their young age. Our parents always pushed us by saying “ponte las pilas” and these children will make you parents wish you listened. Here are some of the Latinos that have crushed it on national TV in both the U.S. and Latin America.

Angel Garcia, singer, “America’s Got Talent”

Twelve-year-old Los Angeles native Angel Garcia’s powerful voice got him through to the second round in this season of “America’s Got Talent.” He sang the mariachi song from José José, “El Triste.” His performance of the song got people on their feet and electrified the audience. He kept the Latino pride going strong in the judges’ cuts round by singing Bruno Mars’ “Just the Way You Are” in Spanish. He may have gone home after that round but there’s no denying his incredible talent.

Guillermo Gael Delgado Garcia, dancer, “Little Big Shots”

Guillermo Gael Delgado Garcia was invited to the couch with Steve Harvey on “Little Big Shots” two years ago after his video dancing gleefully at a swimming pool went viral. He wowed the crowd by jumping off the stage and charismatically made his way through the audience. Just watching him dance can put an automatic smile on your face.

Los Niños de La Voz Kids, singers, La Voz Colombia

Grab your tissues because this is one sweet rendition of “Recuerdame” from the hit movei “Coco.” The judges are clearly into this number by snapping their fingers to the beat. When you hear a performance like this one, doesn’t it inspire you to build a better world for future generations? Sí se puede. They deserve it so much.

Alondra Santos, singer, “America’s Got Talent”

When Alondra Santos was 13 years old she got a chance to show off her mariachi chops on the 10th season of “America’s Got Talent.” Seeing the young girl wearing a full mariachi outfit and giving the musical genre life on the national stage is everything. Her shy nature was put on the backseat as soon as the first violin notes started playing. Press ‘play’ to see her first audition on the show.

Ellie, singer, La Voz Kids Colombia

Seven-year-old Ellie hails from Barranquilla, Colombia. Even at her young age, she is extremely proud of her coastal heritage. She expresses her love for the region’s music, its drums and also its songs. As soon as the drums start at the 2:03 minute mark, Ellie has a little fit of nerves but then she is on fire with her vocals and dancing. She wins over all the judges by the end, even though it took Sebastián Yatra a few minutes to finally press that buzzer.

Jossue, singer, “La Voz Kids”

Another pint-size performer that took the judges’ breath away was mariachi singer Jossue on “La Voz Kids.” Each time he sang “Ay Chabela,” it was like the audience was watching a mini Vicente Fernandez in front of their eyes. As he was going through his performance, the judges hadn’t hit the buzzer but Natalia Jiménez and Pedro Fernández finally both did at the same time, and then Daddy Yankee gave that buzzer a pound. Jossue’s OMG face when he realized his singing ability made all three judges want to coach him is just too cute.

Yasha and Daniela, dancers, “America’s Got Talent”

Daniela may have been a little girl when she first appeared on the America’s Got Talent stage, but she knew how to already call the shots as a boss! Her sassiness is immediately apparent in her pointed hands and facial expressions before she flips and does a cartwheel as soon as the music starts playing.


READ: These Two Latino Dance Sensations Are Everything You Wish You And Your Siblings Were

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Things That Matter

Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Yasin Yagci / Getty Images

Mexico is celebrating four compassionate children who have each been nominated for a prestigious international award, for their dedication to solving issues within their own communities.

Three kids from Oaxaca and one from Sinaloa have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award – which is award to children from around the world who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

Each of Mexico’s four nominees have done so much for their communities – and the world at large – that it’s going to be a close contest to decide who is the ultimate winner.

Four kids from Mexico are in the running for a prestigious international peace award.

Among 138 children from 42 countries, four Mexican kids have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award, which is awarded to minors who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

The award comes with a €100,000 (about $117,000 USD) prize which can be used to invest in the solutions they’ve been championing. In fact, one of last year’s winners was climate change activist Greta Thunberg and peace advocate Divina Maloum from Cameroon.

On this occasion, Mexico’s nominees are counting on the win and include three nominees from Oaxaca and one from the state of Sinaloa.

Each of the children nominated have done incredible work to help solve issues in their communities.

In order to be nominated for the award and to be considered for the top prize, children must demonstrate their commitment to making a “special effort to promote children’s rights and better the situation of vulnerable children,” according to the Children’s Peace Prize website.

It goes without saying that each of Mexico’s four nominees have already checked off each of those requirements, with each of them making major advancements in issues that affect their communities, their country, and children from around the world.

In fact, the issues this group of children have been taking on range from combatting bullying and domestic violence, to increasing access to education, protecting young women and girls from endemic violence, and combatting the global Covid-19 pandemic.

One nominee from Oaxaca founded her own foundation to help advance the issues she cares about.

In an interview with Milenio, Georgina Martínez, 17, said that the award represents a great opportunity.

“This year we are among the 142 nominees from 42 different countries and I believe that without a doubt there is a commitment from all of us as Mexican children and young people to win it to continue fighting for our dreams,” she said.

Martínez, who won the national youth award in 2017, has been working for the rights of children and young people for 10 years through various campaigns, such as “Boys and Girls to the Rescue”, which focused on helping vulnerable minors combat bullying and domestic violence. She also supported the Nutrikids campaign that fed minors in precarious situations, worked to build classrooms in impoverished communities, and has also been a speaker at various conferences.

“My activism began when I was 9 years old, when I participated in the ninth parliament of the girls and boys of Mexico, where I was a children’s legislator. We spent a week at the Chamber of Deputies to work in favor of children’s rights. There I realized that my voice could be heard and that I could be the voice of many children who perhaps did not have access to many of their rights such as education and health,” she told Milenio.

Young Georgina Martínez is in her last year of high school, and she has in mind to continue working in the present and the future to continue being a person and agent of change.

Martínez’s brother is also in the running for his work against the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jorge Martínez, the 13-year-old brother of Georgina, considers it a great honor to represent Oaxaca in the contest.

“I was nominated for my masks project, which consists of using 3D printing to print universal headbands and make acrylic masks, which I donate to hospitals,” he told Milenio.

“I started by making 100 masks, which I financed with my savings, and donated them to the children’s hospital to help hospitalized children so that they wouldn’t be infected with Covid-19. The project went viral allowing me to grow the project and it soon gained international attention,” he added.

Many of his neighbors and friends consider him to be an actual genius but he’s far too modest to take on that title. He said that “the truth is, all this technology is something that I like a lot and it’s fun to be able to work in fields that you enjoy.”

Martínez also shared his plans for the future, telling Milenio that he’d love to move to China to be able to work in robotics and engineering.

Oaxaca also has a third nominee in the global contest.

Oaxaca’s third nominee for the prize is a young ballet dancer, activist, and storyteller – Aleida Ruiz Sosa – who is a defender of women’s rights. She’s currently studying online as she finishes high school and plans to pursue a law degree, in addition to advancing her dance career.

She’s been a longstanding voice for women.

“Since I was very young I have worked hard to help my community. I have a collection of stories called “Rainbow”, that speaks out about violence against women. In fact, I worked with the Attorney General of Oaxaca, and the main thing is that all the proceeds from the sale of these stories will go to the young victims of femicide,” she told Milenio.

Also nominated is 16-year-old Enrique Ángel Figueroa Salazar of Mazatlán, who is passionate about children’s rights and wishes to change local, federal and global societies so that children can live a life free of violence.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Sesame Street’s Special On Antiracism Is A Reminder Of All The Times They’ve Tackled Difficult Topics Head-On

Entertainment

Sesame Street’s Special On Antiracism Is A Reminder Of All The Times They’ve Tackled Difficult Topics Head-On

Photo: via Getty Images

“Sesame Street” continues to put in the work and have difficult conversations publicly, and in ways that children can understand.

The legendary kids’ show recently announced that they will be airing an antiracism special starting on October 15th called “The Power of We.” The special will aim to teach families how to “become upstanders against racism”.

“Children look to their families with love and trust to guide their understanding about their place in this great big world,” read a statement on The Sesame Street Workshop’s website. “This Sesame Street special is an uplifting and joyful celebration of how each of us is unique and how we can work together to help make this world a better place for ourselves, our friends, and for everyone!”

The special plans to explore topics of everyone having different skin colors and identities, and what it means to be “color proud”—having pride in your own culture and race.

According to Sesame Street Workshop, the special will center around Elmo, Abby Cadabby, Gabrielle, and Gabrielle’s cousin Tamir. It will also include appearances from celebrity guests like Yara Shahidi, Christopher Jackson, and Andra Day.

As long-time fans of “Sesame Street” know, this is not the first time the iconic show has tackled difficult topics in a kid-friendly manner. The show has long prided itself on teaching children about life’s difficulties from an early age. The program has been groundbreaking in its treatment of taboo topics.

For example, in 2018 the program addressed the topic of homelessness in a segment called “A Rainbow Kind of Day”.

In the segment, a muppet name Lilly decides she doesn’t want to paint anymore. After being encouraged to talk about her feelings by Elmo and Sophia, she explains that she is sad because the color purple reminds her of her old room in a home she doesn’t have anymore. Sophia teaches her that “home is where ever the love lives, and you can take that love and hope with you wherever you go.”

Or in 2012 when the show featured a character whose parents were divorced–a familial situation that is surprisingly still underrepresented on kids’ TV shows.

In this episode, Abby Cadabby makes drawings of her two homes. A confused Elmo gets a lesson from Gordon on what divorce is. Gordon’s matter-of-fact explanation takes away any shame or stigma that children of divorce might be feeling because their families are a little bit different than others’.

And of course, the legendary episode from 1982 in which Big Bird learns about death and grief.

To this day, critics call this episode “revolutionary” for the way it avoided pandering or condescending to children. It was in this episode that “Sesame Street” showed the confidence that it has in its audience. The creatives behind the show obviously recognize that children (just like adults) are hyper-aware of everything going on around them.

“Sesame Street has always been real-world,” Sherrie Westin, Sesame Workshop’s EVP of global impact and philanthropy, told Fast Company in 2017. “It’s not a fantasy, it’s not a fairy tale. One of the things that sets us apart is respecting children and dealing with real-world issues from a child’s perspective.”

You can watch Sesame Street’s “The Power of We” streaming on HBO Max starting on Thursday, October 15th. It will also air on PBS stations that same day. You can download the special’s companion guide here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com