Entertainment

Someone On Twitter Claims To Have Figured Out Who Bad Bunny’s Muse Is And We Are Here For It

Bad Bunny is as melodramatic as he is a hitmaker. The emo Latin trap king is always rapping or singing about a love interest, whether expressing heartbreak (“Amorfoda”), blaming his ex for the split (“Soy Peor”), declaring he’s better off without her (“Solo de Mí”), reminiscing on their past (“La Canción”), realizing he hasn’t quite moved on (“Triste”), acknowledging she was right all along (“Otra Noche en Miami”), imagining the life they could have had together (“Si Estuviésemos Juntos”), asking her to return (“Vuelve”) or reminding her that she’ll always be his (“Mia”).

Someone clearly broke El Conejo Malo’s heart — and a Twitter fan thinks he’s uncracked who the perp could be.

In a lengthy thread on Twitter, user and major Benito stan @vicentetrujillo8, also known as “god bunny,” made a convincing case on how Bad Bunny’s ex-girlfriend Carliz is the famed artist’s muse behind his biggest hits.

Credit: @vicentetrujilo8 / Twitter

“Este hilo es con fin de entrener y para hablar sobre una persona que ha sido fuente de inspiración para las letras de Benito, y como él la sigue recordando en sus canciones,” the Mexico-based enthusiast begins the thread, also posting an old photo of the former couple.

According to the fan, Benito and Carliz were high school sweethearts who dated from 2011 to 2017.

The pair allegedly worked at the Econo supermarket together in Vega Baja before his career took off in 2016. The following year, the couple, according to Vicente, had planned to wed. Instead, they split up. Since then, the sad boy pisces has made numerous songs about an ex, many that the Benito devotee believes were directed at Carliz.

In “Otra Noche en Miami,” Bad Bunny raps, “Pero son las 11:34 y de ti me acordé” y “En el garaje esta el Bentley que tanto querías.” In Vicente’s posts, he highlights two tweets from Carliz, one from February 14, 2018, Valentine’s Day, when she wrote simply “11:34” and another where she joked “voy a tener que empezar a cobra regalías.” 

In a later Instagram live, she also notes that her dream car is a Bentley.

There’s no solid proof that those Benito verses were directed to Carliz, but it does seem hella likely.

Vicente, however, digs deeper into El Conejo Malo’s lyrics for further evidence.

In “Si Estuviésemos Juntos,” an aged Bunny imagines a wedding with a woman that never took place, much like his planned nuptials with Carliz. Even more, the woman booked to be Benito’s bride in the video heavily resembles his ex, with bangs just as she used to have when they were dating.

In current songs like “No Me Conoce” Remix and “Callaíta,” Vicente is convinced he’s talking about Carliz.

Benito bigs up women who are both smart and sexy, he could once more be referring to women like Carliz, a student at the University of Puerto Rico School of Law who often takes videos of herself with friends singing and dancing along to reggaeton and Latin trap hits, oftentimes many of Bad Bunny’s own jams.

“Por lo que muestra en sus redes, podemos deducir que Carliz es una chica buena y estudiosa, pero que disfruta su vida junto a sus amigas. Una que otra vez, la hemos visto en sus historias de Instagram, bailar las canciones de Benito como Mía, Callaíta, No Me Conoce, etc,” Vicente writes.

While the fan makes a strong case about Carliz being the muse behind many of Bad Bunny’s songs, Bad Bunny has us thinking otherwise.

Credit: Chente Ydrach / YouTube

In an interview with Puerto Rican comedian Chente Ydrach, Benito noted that his songs were directed to different women and were even sometimes an imagining of what some of the ladies he has dated would say or feel about him.

In the interview, which was published on the funny guy’s vlog on December 24, the day Benito dropped his surprise debut album, Chente asks bluntly, “who are you talking about?”

“I’ve been a lover since I was a boy, since I was little. In the first grade, I’d bring a Valentine’s Day gift to school, and I would give it to the prettiest girl I saw that day. So since I was a kid, I’ve been a lover, and when I fall, I really love them and suffer and cry and think, ‘damn, I really love her.’ I’m of that flow,” he said, suggesting that he has had many heartbreaks and thus writes about each of them.

He goes on to say that the sad songs on X100PRE, as well as the ones that came before the album, are about different women from different times of life because he has gotten his heart broken on multiple occasions.

But he also adds that some of the songs are imaginings of what the women whose hearts he shattered would say about him.

“When I sing ‘Amorfoda’ in my concerts, I always say that I’ve fallen in love a thousand times, I’ve had my heart broken a thousand times and I’ve also broken a thousand hearts. So there are also songs that I sing as if the person who I fucked up with is singing it to me. ‘Soy Peor’ doesn’t signify that I’m worse; it signifies that she’s worse because of me,” he shares.

With Benito’s relationship with Carliz being his longest, and possibly the most meaningful, it’s likely that Vicente is right about many of El Conejo Malo’s songs referencing this specific ex. However, as a self-described lover and heartbreaker, Bunny himself admits that his tracks are inspired by several past and current romances, and the only one who could identify which emo bop is for which lover is, well, Benito.

Read: 7 Crucial Lessons On Self-Love, As Taught By Body Positive Trapero Bad Bunny 

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Bad Bunny’s Concert Parade Made History And Shined A Light On Latino Communities In NYC

Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s Concert Parade Made History And Shined A Light On Latino Communities In NYC

Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

Leave it to Bad Bunny to elevate the art of a virtual concert with his first live performance in this era of the Coronavirus pandemic.

The beloved San Benito performed a concert on the back of a flatbed truck slowly driving through the Bronx, Washington Heights, and Harlem. The reggaetonero’s set was streamed as part of Uforia’s monthly music series, through which the music outlet, owned by Univision, has lined up concerts to the end of the year. “It was difficult for me to do a concert without an audience. I didn’t want to,” Bad Bunny said during the show, according to Billboard. “But I’m accepting the new reality and I hope people enjoy this. We need it.”

Based upon the hype and reviews, it’s obvious that we the people loved it.

Bad Bunny’s free NYC concert made history as he paraded across the city in a flatbed truck.

Bad Bunny’s moving concert, which started outside Yankee Stadium and at certain points had him literally ducking under traffic light and bridges, was livestreamed on the Uforia app and his own YouTube channel. The hit concert featured songs off his February album YHLQMDLG, including “Si Veo a Tu Mamá,” “La Difícil,” and “Pero Ya No,” among others.

The history-making performance concluded outside Harlem Hospital, where the rapper thanked front-line medical workers for their efforts during the coronavirus quarantine, and performed his song “Yo Perreo Sola.”

“Respect and thanks to those people who have sacrificed their lives in this city,” Bad Bunny told the crowd, per Billboard. “With a lot of faith in God, I sense that good things are coming. I know we are going through very difficult times. I have made thousands of mistakes, but my only mission is to try to be a better person every day.”

The hit concert coincided with the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria.

Bad Bunny’s concert was a celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month but it also fell on the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria, which devastated Bad Bunny’s home of Puerto Rico. He thanked Latinos for supporting him and offered words of encouragement during the pandemic.

“With a lot of faith in God, I sense that good things are coming,” he added. “I know we are going through very difficult times, but I have hope that people doing things with their heart, spirit, faith and hope, we’re going to move forward.”

Bad Bunny was joined by virtual appearances from reggaeton stars J Balvin, Sech and Mora. The show was produced by Univision’s Uforia, the radio broadcasting and music events division of the company. 

“We are extremely excited to celebrate the richness of Latinx culture during Hispanic Heritage Month with this one-of-a-kind live streaming experience, and also commemorate the Puerto Rico community’s resilience on the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria, in partnership with Verizon,” Jesus Lara, president of radio at Univision, said in a statement. “We are proud to showcase the artistry of Bad Bunny who has had such a profound impact on our culture and the music industry at large.”

Imagine being the lucky resident of this building with a view like this…

A live stream showed the Latin Grammy award-winning artist dodging traffic lights and excited fans chasing him down streets with their cellphones in hand in New York City. 

El Conejo Malo literally brought the concert to people’s doorsteps. He also used the concert as a chance to shine a light on his native Puerto Rico and the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria that devastated the area. P.R. is still in recovery he mentioned. As the sun went down, Benito tore through the hits from his first album X 100pre like “Ni Bien Ni Bien,” “Sólo de Mí,” and “Romana”.

Although Coronavirus has had a major impact on the music industry, Bad Bunny has found ways to keep himself plenty busy.

CREDIT: EMMA MCINTYRE / GETTY IMAGES

Despite spending most of the year in quarantine in his native Puerto Rico, Bad Bunny has been extremely busy. From gracing magazine covers and making history in the process to surprise releasing an entire album, Bad Bunny has kept his fans on their toes.

The reggaetonero was also set to perform two sold-out shows on October 30-31 at San Juan’s Hiram Bithorn stadium, but they’ve been canceled in the wake of Covid-19. So this was the first chance for San Benito fans to witness live renditions from his record-breaking 2020 album YHLQMDLG, and his follow-up surprise album Las Que No Iban a Salir.

The “Yo Perrea Sola” singer also collaborated with Dua Lipa, J Balvin, and Tainy on a hit single, “Un Día (One Day)”. He’s also set to be recognized with the Hispanic Heritage Award for Vision in recognition for his impact as an artist and activist.

You can rewatch the full show here.

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Get Ready! Bad Bunny Set To Perform Historic Online Concert To Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

Entertainment

Get Ready! Bad Bunny Set To Perform Historic Online Concert To Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

Notice to all Bad Bunny fans! This is not a drill! The reggaetonero is officially back on stage with an historic concert planned for this weekend (September 20).

In recent weeks, Bad Bunny has been silent on social media. “Goodbye, I’m gone,” he said to his fans on May 19, telling them that he wanted to take a break after the release of his album YHLQMDLG last February, then again after his surprise drop of Las que no iban a salir.

But now the singer appears to be gradually making his musical comeback. Just a few weeks ago, San Benito published an unreleased track in which he sends a message to those who criticized him for seemingly going quiet with so much going on in the world. Confident that there are bigger problems in the world, El Conejo Malo sings, “They are fighting because they gave me the title of composer of the year but not for what really matters.”

Bad Bunny will be taking the stage for a free concert this Sunday!

Credit: Uforia / Univision

In an announcement, Uforia, The Home of Latin Music, said that they’d be conducting exclusive live stream performances once a month until the end of the year under the banner of Uforia Live. And Bad Bunny is the first artist to launch the series!

“We are extremely happy to celebrate the richness of Latin culture during Hispanic Heritage Month with this one-of-a-kind live broadcast experience,” said Univision Radio President Jesus Lara.

“We are proud to present Bad Bunny’s artistry, which has had such a profound impact on our culture and the music industry in general,” he continued.

“Bad Bunny is one of the most popular artists in the world. He constantly manages to break international barriers of language and stereotypes, becoming a global icon of culture and entertainment.”

For all you San Benito fans, the concert will take place on September 20, is completely free, and will be available to watch on Bad Bunny’s YouTube channel, Twitch, and the Uforia app. Stay tuned because Uforia will soon announce the details on upcoming dates and artists.

Although Coronavirus has had a major impact on the music industry, Bad Bunny has found ways to keep himself plenty busy.

Credit: Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

Despite spending most of the year in quarantine in his native Puerto Rico, Bad Bunny has been extremely busy. From gracing magazine covers and making history in the process to surprise releasing an entire album, Bad Bunny has kept his fans on their toes.

The reggaetonero was also set to perform two sold-out shows on October 30-31 at San Juan’s Hiram Bithorn stadium, but they’ve been canceled in the wake of Covid-19. So this will be the first chance for San Benito fans to witness live renditions from his record-breaking 2020 album YHLQMDLG, and, if we’re lucky, from his follow-up surprise album Las Que No Iban a Salir.

The “Yo Perrea Sola” singer also collaborated with Dua Lipa, J Balvin, and Tainy on a hit single, “Un Día (One Day)”. He’s also set to be recognized with the Hispanic Heritage Award for Vision in recognition for his impact as an artist and activist.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com