Entertainment

These Colombia Game Watching Parties In Miami Will Leave You With Some Serious FOMO

thedeckwynwood / Instagram

Miami has long been associated as being a haven for Cubans and Cuban-Americans, but Colombians have been making their mark on the Magic City in recent years. The unmistakable charm and the sheer number of Colombians in Miami is especially apparent when you add in the fervor of the World Cup.

Fans around the Magic City painted bars, arepa houses and pubs in the yellow jerseys and sombrero vueltiao that have become synonymous with Colombian fútbol fans.

Beers went flying and flags were waved when Colombia came back for a brief moment of fleeting glory. The 93rd minute of play in the Round of 16 match between England and Los Cafeteros was an equalizer and it was tense. Here’s how Colombians in Miami were celebrating and panicking.

Obviously, there was pure elation because that’s how we do.

#colombia #seleccioncolombia #loscafeteros #vamoscolombia

A post shared by Esteven Gonzalez (@thegeniusteve) on

Just look at all the emotions on display: crying, happiness, excitement, relief. It’s a nice feeling.

People were climbing buildings with so much excitement when Colombia tied it all up.

#colombia !!

A post shared by ONLYinDADE (@onlyindade) on

These fans were celebrating together in a beer garden in the Coral Gables neighborhood on Tuesday after Yerry Mina’s goal. This is one celebration giving everyone FOMO.

Even businesses, like Univision Deportes, had rowdy crowds during the game.

This post from the headquarters of Univision Deportes in Miami is basically everyone in your office pool that wanted Colombia to win.

Unfortunately, Colombia was eventually brought down by the nail-biting penalty kicks, in which the team ended up missing two, sending England on to the quarter-finals.

Miami Colombians were early for every game to celebrate their boys in yellow.

Honestly, getting Miamians anywhere before 10 a.m. is almost impossible. However, these fans were all settled in long before 10 a.m. to cheer on their team.

Some bartenders even got caught up in the party.

#Colombia #mundial2018 #colombiamiami

A post shared by Fabian (@ridin_round_n_gettin_it22) on

La Poderosa is known for bringing the Barranquilla vibes to the M-I-A and Colombia fans were basking in the full soccer glory with their compatriots during the group matches.

Don’t worry. There was salsa dancing as required.

Fans couldn’t stop moving to Joe Arroyo’s classic anthem “No le pegue a la negra” when the team beat Poland.

But, probably the most important thing, is that good doggos were present.

Vamos Colombia!! #colombia #worldcup2018

A post shared by Herb E. (@herbieherbz) on

Baru in, in the Brickell neighborhood, is known for playing Latin hits while twenty and thirty-somethings cheers to the #goodlife with aguardiente. But during World Cup season, fans come to watch the games instead of dance, bringing along their furry friends for moral support as well.

All in all, Colombia left it all out on the field and fans of La Tricolor Colombiana should be proud their team showed so much heart throughout the tournament. Here’s to starting the countdown until the next World Cup!


READ: 13 Places That Are Bringing Colombian Culture To Miami

How did you cheer for your team during the World Cup? Show us using #ShowUsYourColors and #WorldCup2018.

Latin America Is Fighting A Banana Fungus That Threatens America’s Favorite Fruit

Culture

Latin America Is Fighting A Banana Fungus That Threatens America’s Favorite Fruit

Jametlene Reskp / Unsplash

Did you wake up and eat a banana for breakfast this morning? Straight out of the peel? Or maybe you chopped it up into a few pieces and tossed it into a smoothie or over a bowl of cereal?  

Or maybe your abuelita fried a few up and served them with some crema and a side of rice and frijoles? 

Bananas are a staple food item around the world. In fact, we consume around 114 millions tons of them every single year. So you can imagine why many people are freaking out over recent news that a banana killing fungus has taken hold. It could literally spell the end for our beloved banana. 

A deadly fungus has infested banana crops across Colombia.

Bad news for banana lovers: A fungus that’s particularly adept at killing the fruit has finally reached Latin America — a major supplier of the world’s bananas — as scientists long feared it would.

Recently, officials in Colombia declared a national emergency after confirming the presence of this deadly fungus, known as Fusarium oxysporum Tropical Race 4 (TR4), in the country, according to the Colombian Agricultural Institute (ICA)

This is the first time the fungus has been detected in Latin America. However, the fungus isn’t new — for decades, it has been devastating banana plantations in Asia, Australia and East Africa.

This is potentially devastating news because Latin America was one of the few remaining fungus-free regions in the world.

Although this fungus isn’t harmful to humans, it is a “serious threat” to banana production, according to the United Nations. The fungus attacks the plant’s roots and blocks its vascular system — the network used to transport water and nutrients — and ultimately kills the plant. Once the fungus finds its way into soil, it can’t be treated with fungicides, and it’s very difficult to remove.

So what does this mean for the fruit so many of us have come to enjoy?

Well, the fungus attacks the most commonly exported banana, the Cavendish banana. “For Western countries, the vast majority of the bananas we eat are from the same Cavendish subgroup,” Nicolas Roux, a senior scientist at Bioversity International in France, told Live Science in a June interview.

“What we’re having is an almost apocalyptic scenario where we’ll probably lose Cavendish [banana]” Sarah Gurr, Exeter University’s chair in food security, told Wired in an interview.

Also, side note, the Cavendish bananas which are what most of us buy in the supermarket, are literal clones of one another.

Cavendish bananas reproduce asexually, meaning that the plants are essentially clones of their parents. This means banana crops lack genetic diversity, and infections can spread quickly. That’s not weird at all. 

Virtually every supermarket banana in the world is a Cavendish, a strain chosen for its hardiness and easy cultivation. In the 1950s, it replaced the Gros Michel, a comparable banana that was all but wiped out by the soil-dwelling fungus Panama disease. Also known as Fusarium fungus, the blight blackens bananas from the inside out. Once it’s infected a plantation, its fruit is toast. Even decades after bananas have gone, the spores hang around in the soil, with the potential to re-infect crops all over again.

Colombia is just the most recent outbreak. This fungus has been wreaking havoc globally for years.

For the past 30 years, the fungus has wreaked havoc on banana plantations in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Now, Colombia’s agriculture and fishing institute has declared a national emergency after the fungus was found in the northeastern province of La Guajira in June. Nearly 170 hectares (420 acres) of plantations have since been quarantined

So what’s the plan? How will we save the banana? 

A number of ideas have been proposed to help save the Cavendish banana, including genetically engineering plants that are resistant to TR4. Meanwhile, researchers are trying desperately to find a new kind of banana that can survive Tropical Race 4.

Scientists in Australia have created a fungus-resistant variety using genetic engineering. It’s still being tested and would require government approval before it could be grown or sold. 

Other scientists are looking through nature’s storehouse. Unfortunately, 80% of banana fruits are susceptible to TR4. And none of the fungus-resistant plants are ready to replace the bananas that currently fill supermarket shelves. Most of them are cooking bananas, or plantains. Others are wild bananas with tiny fruit that’s inedible; the pods are full of seeds.

The hope, however, is that plant breeders can take these plants and cross-pollinate them, mating them with other, more commercially viable bananas, reshuffling the genes to create new varieties that are both delicious and immune to TR4.

This Team Of Synchronized Swimmers With Down Syndrome Were Denied Access To A Pool For Fear Of Contaminating Other Swimmers

Entertainment

This Team Of Synchronized Swimmers With Down Syndrome Were Denied Access To A Pool For Fear Of Contaminating Other Swimmers

sirenasespeciales / Instagram

Sirenas Especiales (Special Mermaids) is giving girls with Down Syndrome in Mexico a chance to show off their athletic abilities in synchronized swimming. The team and program were organized by Paloma Torres, a former synchronized swimmer from Peru, after she studied educational psychology. Her thesis was on the cognitive benefits of synchronized swimming. With that and a little patience, Sirenas Especiales was born.

Sirenas Especiales is tearing down the stigma and misinformation about people with Down Syndrome.

Credit: sirenasespeciales / Instagram

Coach Paloma Torres knew that people with Down Syndrome are often very creative and flexible. Those two characteristics are perfect for synchronized swimming so she knew that it would be a great idea to get a group of girls together.

However, Torres and Sirenas Especiales immediately faced pushback from local pools in Mexico City because of the girls’ Down Syndrome.

Credit: sirenasespeciales / Instagram

“I had to find a swimming pool where we could organize regular practices. At first, I couldn’t find anywhere. One pool even refused entry to my swimmers, saying that they might contaminate other swimmers! It was really disheartening at first — both for me and for the girls’ parents,” Torres told France24. “Finally, I found the Alberca Olímpica Francisco Márquez pool, which is located in southern Mexico City. I’ve been training the group there since 2011.”

The team overcame the initial mistreatment from local pools and have been competing in national and international competitions.

Credit: sirenasespeciales / Instagram

Their Instagram is filled with photos of the team holding medal from the various competitions they have participated in. They’ve competed all over Mexico and were recently at the PanAm games to cheer on Mexico’s national synchronizing team.

The team continues to grow with more girls and boys wanting to participate in synchronized swimming.

Credit: sirenasespeciales / Instagram

Torres currently trains about 20 swimmers between 14 and 30. There are three boys who are part of the team and 17 girls, according to France24. It seems clear that the swimmers enjoy their chance to show off their own athletic abilities.

The sport is doing more than just giving them something to do.

Este día tan especial Sirenas Especiales darán entrevista en Capital 21 Canal 21 en TV abierta, no se lo pierdan a las 10:35am en VIVO!!!!! FELIZ DÍA MUNDIAL DEL SINDROME DE DOWN Edith Perez Rocio Hernández Martínez Paloma Torres Montserrat Vega Triny Turcio Blanca Olivia Fontes Machado Araceli Vazquez Loredo Beatriz Mendoza Castañón China Li Lourdes Castellanos Daniel Perez Martinez

Posted by Sirenas Especiales on Tuesday, March 21, 2017

This sport helps participants improve their concentration and memory,” Torres told France24. “However, most importantly, this activity helps them integrate socially. They participate regularly in competitions both nationally and internationally, which sometimes include swimmers without disabilities. Our team has won about 50 medals. They become more social and their work is applauded. It’s also important for their families because some of them don’t think that these girls will make something of their lives.”

One thing Sirenas Especiales is doing to changing the narrative around disabilities one synchronized swim at a time.

Credit: Sirenas Especiales / Facebook

The swimmers are showing everyone that you can do anything you set your mind to. There is nothing that can keep them from participating in the sport that they love and enjoy.

Congratulations, swimmers.

We can’t wait to see what you do next.

READ: The Internet Was Having A Collective Sob Fest After A Video Of Young Disabled Man’s Reaction To Getting His First Job Goes Viral

Paid Promoted Stories