Entertainment

The NCAA Is Ready To Abandon Its Outdated Beliefs: College Athletes Will Now Be Able To Reap Gains On Endorsement Deals

Every year billions of dollars are generated off the backs of an unpaid labor force: college athletes. Universities take advantage of athletes’ amateur status to pocket the profits of what has turned into an exploitative world of high-revenue college sports. But legislators are forcing college sports to find fairer alternatives.

The NCAA announced yesterday that it voted in favor of letting college athletes profit from their name, image, and likeness.

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The Board of Governors of the NCAA, which oversees college sports, announced yesterday that it had voted unanimously to adjust rules that prohibited players from generating money from their own fame. The move came after lawmakers in several states began proposing or enacting legislation that gives college athletes the right to profit off their name and likeness. 

Last month, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed the Fair Pay to Play Act, giving college athletes the ability to earn income from endorsements and sponsorships starting in 2023. 

The legislation bypassed a National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) ban on players receiving any compensation aside from scholarships. At the time, NCAA regulations disallowed student athletes from executing any endorsement deals or accepting payment for the use of their images. The new California law, which is scheduled to go into effect in 2023, would now allow them to reap the financial rewards for their athletic abilities. It would also bar the NCAA from retaliating against the colleges and student athletes. 

In an interview with the New York Times, Newsom said, “Every single student in the university can market their name, image and likeness; they can go and get a YouTube channel and they can monetize that. The only group that can’t are athletes. Why is that?” 

While the NCAA’s reluctant bend in favor of popular opinion is understandably being characterized as a landmark victory for college athletes, the organization was vague about how it plans to implement these changes. 

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The NCAA said the updated policies would be “in a manner consistent with the collegiate model.” But the organization’s idea of “collegiate model” is rooted in the fallacy that college athletes are amateurs, even if schools and coaches are being paid bountifully for these athletes’ hard work. So who knows whether yesterday’s vote is truly a turning point for the NCAA—or just an attempt to head off more far-reaching reforms.

For now, the NCAA should thank government officials for applying the necessary pressure to force college sports in a new direction. 

That more athletes would get tired of being exploited by the NCAA and its member schools was only a matter of time. If the organization doesn’t change its ways, a true collegiate pay-for-play system could emerge—and not under the NCAA’s control. Lawmakers in California and other states created a perfect opportunity for the NCAA to abandon its outdated beliefs and embrace a progressive system that will ensure its survival.

An HBO documentary, Student Athlete, highlights the travails of college athletes. 

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A former Rutgers football player is depicted working part-time jobs after graduating and sleeps in his car. ‘Student Athlete’ unveils the exploitative world of high-revenue college sports through the stories of four young men at different stages in their athletic careers.The documentary posits that those who don’t make it big after graduation would at least earn something for all of their hard work.  

Coaches make millions while players and their families live below the poverty line.

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Former coach and NCAA critic John Shoop said, “The coaches are making millions of dollars and they’re coaching players whose parents live below the poverty line.” “If you’re a reasonable person, it’s insane to build a $150 million recruiting facility, pay your head coach $10 million, the rest of your staff $20 million cumulative, but then say there’s not enough money to help the players.”

The new rules might prove especially beneficial to athletes whose careers end at college level —particularly female athletes.

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Despite the imbalances that exist in college sports, the new rules should put the NCAA in a better position to create more financial opportunities for players—especially those whose athletic careers end at the college level. The policy change could prove particularly beneficial to female athletes, who usually don’t have the same professional opportunities as men and often reach the height of their popularity in college. As the former UCLA gymnast Katelyn Ohashi pointed out recently in The New York Times, she missed out on a lot of money because she was unable to capitalize on her viral fame.

“The NCAA is a billion-dollar industry built on the backs of college athletes,” Ohashi stated. “How different would things be for me had I been able to use my image and name my last year of school in order to promote the things I want to further my future? I want to make sure the next person doesn’t have to wonder.”

The new legislation and NCAA rule, may finally level the playing field and offer the student-athletes the opportunity to be compensated for their hard work.

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Dad Of Julio Urías Got A Tattoo Honoring His Son’s World Series Win

Entertainment

Dad Of Julio Urías Got A Tattoo Honoring His Son’s World Series Win

Parents always find new ways to be proud of their children and how to tell the world how proud they are. This includes Julio Urías’ father who recently unveiled his newest tattoo in honor of his World Series-winning son.

Julio Urías’ dad is showing off just how proud he is of his son.

Tattoo artist Andres Ortega Rojas posted photos on Instagram showing off the tattoo. Carlos Urías forever enshrined his sons victorious lunge after Game 6 against the Tampa Bay Rays while a tattoo on his left arm.

Rojas told TMZ that the tattoo took nine hours to complete and that is was Carlos’ first tattoo. The moment captured on Carlos’ arm is one that is etched into the brains of Dodgers fans. It was the first time the Dodger has won the World Series since 1988 ending a decades-long dry spell.

The tattoo is catching everyone’s attention.

People are loving the tribute made to his son with a tattoo. It being his first tattoo is even sweeter. We all know how much our parents are anti-tattoos so seeing this happen is extra touching. Julio is framed by the flags of the Commissioner’s Trophy in the tattoo marking what is clearly Carlos’ most proud moment.

The moment marks a culmination of a long journey to athletic stardom.

Julio first pitched for the Dodgers in 2015. The Mexican baseball player was called up to join the famed baseball team. Carlos and the family made a 13-hour road trip from the Mexican state of Sinaloa to Maryvale Park in Phoenix, Ariz. It was after that long trip that Carlos got to see Julio on the field pitching against the Milwaukee Brewers.

It just goes to show you that anything is possible and that, if you work towards your goals, they can come true.

READ: Dodgers Win First World Series Championship Since 1988 And It’s Great To Be An Angeleno

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Nike Signs This 8-Year-Old Soccer Prodigy At Younger Age Than Messi And Neymar

Entertainment

Nike Signs This 8-Year-Old Soccer Prodigy At Younger Age Than Messi And Neymar

Nike has long been known to scout some of the world’s greatest sports talents, especially when it comes to the world of soccer. It began with Neymar, who signed with the multinational corporation at the age of 13. That trend continued with Real Madrid’s Rodrygo, who, at the tender age of 11, became Nike’s youngest-ever affiliated athlete after dazzling at a youth tournament in New York.

But the bar has been raised once again. This time with an 8-year-old player who considered the next great prospect in Brazilian soccer.

Brazilian football prodigy Kauan Basile has signed with Nike at just 8-years-old.

Kauan Basile is just 8-years-old and he’s already playing for the Santos’ U-9 indoor football team. But now he’s just made history as the youngest player ever to sign a deal with Nike.

“I am very happy with the opportunity to play for Santos, as well as the contract. I like to play football,” Kauan Basile told Gazeta Esportiva

According to reports, the contract with Nike is guaranteed over three years, and there’s an option to extend it for two more. He’s now the youngest player in the world to sign with Nike. Even at the end of his contract, Basile will still be younger than both Messi and another ex-Santos kid, Neymar, in signing his first deal at Nike.

Messi put pen to paper on his first Nike contract aged 15, while Neymar was 13.

The kid is generating tons of buzz worldwide.

Basile’s agents, Mengoni Sports, revealed the news of the Nike deal with a proud post on social media. They wrote: “Today Kauan broke the record of being the youngest player in the WORLD by signing a contract with Nike!”

The post went on to add that “He is pure talent! He has football in the soul, in his heart and in his DNA.”

The sports world has reacted with excitement, especially across Brazil where football plays reach God-like status.

Football runs through Basile’s blood.

Like so many of football’s greats, Basile has the tradition of football in his blood. Both his father and great-grandfather both played professionally. His father Andrezinho was on the roster for Corinthians during his playing days.

And his dad couldn’t be more proud of his son going on to such major success, saying he’s ready for superstardom. He said: “He is a player with an absurd will to win. He has a lot of technical quality.”

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