Entertainment

Christina Aguilera Opened The Floodgates For Curious Twitter Fans And Her Answers Were Honest And Real

Just six weeks after Christina Aguilera released her first album in six years, “Liberation,” she’s opened the floodgates to curious Twitter fans to ask her any question they want. Clearly Latino fans and internet users couldn’t resist answering the call for questions.

Here are all the answers to all the questions you never thought to ask the infamous Xtina.

First things first, Aguilera put her heart and soul into “Liberation.”

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

She actually started recording the album in late 2014. While Pharrell Williams and Linda Perry were in the studio in the early days, they didn’t end up on the album.

Some fans threw it all the way back.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

We wish there was video footage, but sadly the closest thing to live social media at the time would have been a point and shoot digital camera video posted on MySpace.

And @xtina became a human before our very eyes.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

If I could not express myself anything less of a hoarse hyena when I sing, it would feel like people could hear the real me.

There were zero product placements to be seen.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

It’s a rarity, and Aguilera has shied away from those kinds of collabs. In June 2016, she released the song “Change,” dedicated to the victims of the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting.

She owned the ways that she failed her authentic self in the past and validated her truth today.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

Maybe it’s because we’re living in a #MeToo age where women in entertainment (and hopefully, everywhere else) feel more empowered to say no and be heard. She wrote “Fall in Line” years before the #MeToo movement picked up steam.

When asked, she said, “It was the song that needed to be heard. Because of what I witnessed when I was growing up I always felt really driven to have a voice that my mom kind of never had in my childhood. So I’ve always wanted to be that advocate for women and anybody that was struggling to have their own voice.”

She didn’t confirm nor deny a possible world tour.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

We have no idea what that means, but she is a master at skirting the real questions. She made this album in her own way and nothing is going to change how she performs it.

Aguilera stood her ground when some fans asked questions she didn’t want to answer.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

First, Xtina was polite, but firm. Translation: “Bish, I don’t need to prove sh*t to noone.”

She laid out the new path for her career. All about artistry, less about numbers.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

Literally, people only had respect for her. That thread is just a bunch of Meryl Streep gifs applauding her.

Some threw plenty of shade though: “That’s nice and all but we don’t care about numbers or chart positions. We care about seeing our fave artist perform LIVE for us,” @XAHuGo85 wrote. “Not just for private events for Billionaires. You’ve abandoned your last 2 albums and we finally thought this would be different. Guess we were wrong.”

She explained why the album took so long to be released.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

Like, yeah, becoming a mother and judging in a reality competition show takes actual time away from your life. The world needed her music to cook for six years in order to get the layered masterpiece that is “María.”

Xtina took a moment to name drop her son, Max, as the future Aguilera to watch.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

“Maria” is her personal favorite on the track, which is both a tribute to her middle name and to Julie Andrews’ character in “The Sound of Music.”

She also gave a shoutout to the perks of motherhood: child’s play.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

If Christina Aguilera was my mom, life would be cozy af. I was team Aguilera all the way in the Aguilera-Spears showdown of the 2000’s, and it is truly crazy that my teen idol is now a mom idol.

Pop stars like horror? Que horror.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

I won’t do horror, but I will do the fact that Xtina’s love for horror is tied to the score. Halloween mash-up coming out soon? Por favor?

Over six years, she wrote a lot of songs that we may never hear.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

All we know is that she started writing the album while she was pregnant, so it’s kind of a testament to her motherhood.

There were moments when her Latinidad truly shined.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

How can you limit something so deep to only three words? Describing one self is a journey to the truth and a testament to your self-worth.

We do know that a tour is in the works.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

The whole world started begging her to come to their corner del mundo to perform. And some fans even got upset that she might not make it there.

Aguilera, while being super open, did stay vague and mysterious.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

Hmmm…how long until the fans find the vocal warm up and spam it all over social media?

Some of the questions did bring out a fun side fo the pop star.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

“Genie in the Butthole.” #DEAD That was the first song I ever recorded on my boom box karaoke cassette tape. We’re not in Kansas anymore, María.

Her answer left all of her fans shook up af.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

Note the fan that immediately changed their handle name to ‘genie in the butthole.’ Mad respect.

Aguilera ended the debate with #Lubrication.

CREDIT: @xtina / Twitter

May #Lubrication spread to all corners of the world, to every fan whose begged for some live #Lubrication, and may Christina María Aguilera forever show us how to harness our stardom until we’re all viejos.


READ: We Ranked Christina Aguilera’s Top 25 Music Videos

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Selena For Sanctuary Is Bringing Their Immigrant-Focused Concert Fundraiser To Los Angeles

Entertainment

Selena For Sanctuary Is Bringing Their Immigrant-Focused Concert Fundraiser To Los Angeles

empressof / mayainthemoment / Instagram

The free Selena-themed outdoor concert in support of immigration rights is going bi-coastal. After the success of their summer show headlined by Colombian-American star Kali Uchis in New York, the event is coming to Los Angeles. The organizer, artist manager, and activist, Doris Muñoz of Mija Management, is bringing the event to the West Coast just in time for LA’s Day of the Dead celebrations on Nov.1. 

Solidarity For Sanctuary is a non-profit aimed to amplify the voices of immigrant communities through music, advocacy, and the arts.

Credit: Forsanctuary / Instagram

Since 2017, Muñoz has been producing Selena for Sanctuary, a concert to help undocumented immigrants. Her mission remains to donate all proceeds from her concerts to undocumented people who need funds for legal fees, to submit DACA applications, etc. This year the entire proceeds of the show went to Make The Road NY. The organization’s mission is to provide “legal and survival services,” develop “transformative education,” and help with “community organizing.” 

“When our parents can barely afford to take a day off of work to go to the lawyer’s office, how are they even going to pay that lawyer,” Muñoz told Remezcla. “I think in the Donald Trump era, we’re sometimes afraid of who we’re talking to and having a brown body, you can feel like a target,” Muñoz added. “To be in a safe space like this, surrounded by people who believe in fighting for your community with you, is really beautiful.” 

Sanctuary for Selena is set to take place on Los Angeles’ iconic Grand Park. 

Credit: ignacio_gallego / Instagram

The concert will be taking place on the first of November, just in time for Downtown L.A.’s Día de los Muertos celebrations. Angelenos will celebrate the ancient party of the dead with a week of altars, remembrance, and traditions that will be wrapped up on the last day, with free music performances by an all Latina lineup.

Organizers of the event took to Instagram to announce the LA-based Selena for Sanctuary.

Credit: forsanctuary / Instagram

The non-profit Solidarity for Sanctuary announced the West Coast concert and lineup on an Instagram post. “We can’t wait to see our friends, family, and community gathered at @grandpark_la for this year’s Grand Park’s Downtown Dia de los Muertos!” read the colorful post featuring an illustration of Selena wearing her iconic high rise pants and bedazzled bustier, surrounded by cempasúchil, the flower of the dead. “On Friday, November 1st Selena for Sanctuary will be taking over in front of City Hall for a free concert featuring an all-female line-up of L.A.-based Latinx artists and SO much more, welcoming immigrants and allies together in celebration and solidarity. It’s an honor to be at Grand Park, a place that along with @musiccenterla has made it their mission to provide a packed calendar of thoughtful and exciting cultural events for all Angelinos to enjoy.”

The aim of Selena for Sanctuary is to raise money and awareness for immigrant issues that are impacting millions of lives. 

Credit: @_forsanctuary / Twitter

Born of a series of benefit concerts she put together in Southern California in 2017 called Solidarity for Sanctuary, Muñoz’s dance parties raise funds to help immigrants navigate the bureaucratic minefield that is U.S. immigration policy to set them on the path to citizenship.  In June, the NYC party was headlined by Kali Uchis, the Colombian-American singer with a critically acclaimed debut LP (2018’s Isolation) and collaborations with Gorillaz, Juanes, and Daniel Caesar. The platform must have liked having women at the front of the lineup, so they’ve confirmed an all-female lineup for the event in L.A. which is great news for the Latina artists.

Here’s the line-up of the concert and it is pretty lit.

Credit: Giphy

It is all about the female empowerment with some of the best Latina acts in the music industry. Here’s who will be shining at the Selena for Sanctuary concert.

Empress Of

Credit: empressof / Instagram

The Honduran-American Lorely Rodriguez will be headlining in LA’s Selena for Sanctuary. Empress Of shifts from English to Spanish to express the vulnerability that lies in both languages. The East LA native will be heading back home to LA for the show, after a long tour of the US.

Ceci Bastida

Credit: cecibastida / Instagram

This Tijuana native is a ska and punk veteran. Bastida broke into the scene plating keyboard and vocals for the political band Tijuana No.1. These days, Ceci is off on her own. Nowadays, she has a new alt-pop sound with a hint of Tijuana No.1’s political energy. 

 San Cha

Credit: el_sancha / Instagram

San Cha’s sound is a mix of ranchera, cumbia and punk. She is reinventing traditional Mexican sounds and injecting them with her own identity as a queer brown woman. 

Maya Murillo

Credit: mayainthemoment / Instagram

Better known as Pero Like’s “Pocha Concha,” Murillo is a multi-talented singer and songwriter. She is most comfortable singing covers which she has shared on YouTube in the past. No wonder Selena for Sanctuary tapped her to sing a Selena song at the event. 

Loyal Lobos

Credit: loyal.lobos / Instagram

For Andrea Silva, the woman behind Loyal Lobos, this event’s mission is very close to her heart. Born in Colombia, Silva immigrated to the US as a child. She often references her experiences as an immigrant and as a feminist in her music. 

August Eve

Credit: augusteverios / Instagram

August Eve had already collaborated with another Selena for Sanctuary headliner, Empress Of. The LA native is taking the stage herself this time with her Old Hollywood-style music.

READ: ‘Selena For Sanctuary’ Is The Free Concert In NYC All About Helping The Immigrant Community

This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

Entertainment

This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

@Doggface208 / TikTok

Everyone has that embarrassing uncle. The one who busts out dancing in public, or makes incredibly old-school dad jokes. Embarrassing uncles keep you guessing what they’ll do next and oftentimes you and your cousins are embarrassed by his bizarre behavior. If you can’t think of an embarrassing uncle, chances are it’s you, you’re the embarrassing uncle or tía. This Mexican man from Wyoming is the quintessential embarrassing uncle, except the internet, unlike your cousins, is loving every minute of his antics. 

Tío TikTok might be a little older than the app’s intended audience, but he still managed to make his content go viral, even when he didn’t even know what TikTok was.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Tío TikTok aka Nathan Apodaca is the grown man who’s single-handedly bringing Gen-Z app TikTok, to Millennials. If you’re wondering what TikTok is, don’t worry. It is basically the second-coming of Vine. It is all about short videos that play in a loop for everyone to enjoy. 

Remember Musical.ly? Maybe you remember the times of Vine? It’s hard to keep up with the constantly changing social media landscape as some apps gain notoriety, others merge, and even more die out. As non-members of the Gen Z generation, it’s even harder to keep it all straight.

The old app Musical.ly was rebranded as TikTok and it’s quickly become Gen Z’s app of choice.

If you do remember Musical.ly, you may know that in August 2018, it rebranded as TikTok. And Vine? That app was the victim of an ever-changing internet and suffered a slow death, causing users to feel the dejection of media abandonment. TikTok though has stirred up a revival of short video clips. Only now, it’s even more interactive, collaborative, and downright addictive.

Apodaca was introduced to the app by his Gen Z daughters, and his videos soon went viral.

Tío TikTok was unaware of the popular video-app himself. His daughters, Makyla and Angelia, are the ones who first introduced Apocada’s to the platform. His youngest daughter even helped him film his first video, which quickly went viral. Apodaca confesses that he was stumped as to what to do, or what type of content to publish on his app, but his eldest daughter came to the rescue and suggested he did his usual goofy dances on camera. And just like that, Apodaca turned into a TikTok sensation.

Tío TikTok’s 16-second videos are simple and hilarious, and they touch a chord with young audiences for their humor.

Credit: @Doggface208 / TikTok

Apodaca shares 16-second bite-sized clips of himself dancing and performing to a tune. His perfectly in-sync interpretations, have gained him nearly 90 thousand followers. Tío TikTok usually jams out to classic ’90s gangsta rap like DMX, Dr. Dre, Eminem or Twista and Gen Z-ers and Millennials alike, can’t seem to get enough of his nostalgic vibes.

In his video’s he’s usually goofing around at work or high off weed which has made his content recognizable.

In one of his most liked posts, Nathan is seen sitting on a conveyor belt lip-syncing Sublime’s ’90s classic hit ‘Santeria’ at the factory where he works and films most of his videos. The post earned 26.9 thousand likes and received thousands of hilarious comments like “*OSHA has entered the chat*” by @BertoBitch or “The workers that package for WISH…”

Apodaca is the stoner uncle you never knew you needed on social media.

His hashtags regularly include 420, 710, ‘high’ and ‘gogreen’, stoner terms used to celebrate dabs and cannabis concentrates. His song choices, usually pulled from an unpredictably random selection, often celebrate the plant too. @Doggface208 aka Nathan Apodaca loves weed so much that he, ingeniously, linked his PayPal account on his TikTok bio for donations; “Now accepting donations 4 Flower 🍃 n white Ts PayPal apodacadogg208@gmail.com” reads his profile description. Whether the account is real or not, we’re not sure, but you’re welcome to send a little donation and let us know.

Most TikTok users may be under 30 according to Apple Store download stats, but we’re sure that this guy’s hilarious videos will attract an older demographic to download the app too.

READ: This 11-Year-Old Latina Has Thousands Of Followers On TikTok And The Most Hilarious Sense Of Humor About Latinidad