Entertainment

Chicano Batman’s Eduardo Arenas Just Dropped A Funky, Christmas Cumbia For You To Bump At Your Holiday Parties

Eduardo Arenas of Chicano Batman has a holiday gift for you. Arenas, who records solo as É Arenas, just dropped “Buñuelos a Montón,” a funky, Christmas-themed cumbia inspired by Mexican legends Chico Che and Rigo Tovar. On “Buñuelos,” Arenas sings about the holiday food that he and his family grew up on: tamales, barbacoa, menudo con pata, champurrado and, of course, buñuelos. Just as Chico Che did in his heyday, Arenas doesn’t take himself too seriously on the track, creating a throwback jam that will probably make you chuckle a bit while you show off your moves on the dance floor.


CREDIT: Lorena Endara

Arenas explained the inspiration behind the song:

“I grew up listening to cumbias from Los Bukis’ more tropical catalogue to banda, like Mi Banda El Mexicano and Banda Machos, which is a whole other kinda party. Growing up, I had the pleasure of watching my uncles play in their super-grupera backyard band (El Nuevo Horizonte) and watching them light up the dance floor was surreal, even for a 7-year-old kid. One can always count on cumbias to tell a vivid story, be funny as hell, and always be catchy and relatable to us.”

Download the song for free (only on December 12) via É Arenas’s official Soundcloud.

Watch Chicano Batman Absolutely Kill It With A Live Performance On ‘Conan’

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Netflix Finally Gave Us The Release Date For “Selena: The Series” And Fans Can’t Wait

Entertainment

Netflix Finally Gave Us The Release Date For “Selena: The Series” And Fans Can’t Wait

contodonetflix / Twitter

One of the most popular and cathartic things to do in the time of Covid is to binge watch shows on streaming platforms. Why drag something out when you can watch an entire season in a day? Well, Selena fans now have one more thing to binge after Netflix announced the release date for “Selena: The Series.”

The world will forever change after Dec. 4.

Netflix is finally releasing the highly anticipated show “Selena: The Series” and we are so stoked to finally see it. The show has been on the radar of Selena fans everywhere since it was announced in 2018. We have all patiently waited for two years to finally see this show.

This is not a drill. This is not a prank. This is a gift from the entertainment deities who want to make sure that we all have something to make these hard times better. All you need is access to a Netflix account, doesn’t matter whose, and the enduring love for Selena that most of us have.

People are marking their calendars for a big day in entertainment.

That’s right. Netflix is releasing “Selena: The Series” and Disney+ is releasing “Mulan” for Disney+ subscribers at no extra charge after trying to rent it for $30 through the app. Dec. 4 is gearing up to be one of the most exciting days for people who just don’t want to leave the house during the current Covid pandemic. What a time to be a live, huh?

Netflix knows exactly what they are doing by releasing this show.

This show is approved by the Quintanilla family so there is that. This show was announced at the same time that Telemundo announced that the Spanish-language network was releasing their own series “El Secreto De Selena.”

The Telemundo show was based on the book written by journalist María Celeste Arrarás. The family has vehemently denied the accusations made in the book multiple times and Telemundo’s decision to make the series, which aired in 2018, angered viewers.

We have been promised a story about Selena that we have not seen in the past.

The Netflix series will not be rehashing what we have already seen. We know the story of Selena’s musical rise and tragic death thanks to “Selena” with J.Lo.

“Selena: The Series” is going to be showing us the life of a young Selena before the fame and musical career. It is truly amazing that after all of these years, there are still new stories to be told about Selena and her important place in American Latino history.

“Before she became the Queen of Tejano Music, Selena Quintanilla was a young girl from Texas with big dreams and an even bigger voice,” reads the description of the show. “The two-part coming-of-age drama ‘Selena: The Series’ explores the once-in-a-generation performer’s journey as a young artist, from singing small gigs in Corpus Christi with her family to becoming one of the most successful Latin artists of all time — and the years of grit and sacrifice the Quintanilla family navigated together before Selena’s meteoric rise to fame.”

So, mark your calendars and gather your loved ones.

This day should be a holiday as we all know that Selena is one of the greatest unifiers in the Latino community. We still sing her songs to this day and her legacy is being passed down to younger Latinos. Selena gave us representations before we knew we wanted and needed it.

It’s like we can already hear those old-school Selena y Los Dinos songs playing in our heads. Dec. 4 can’t get here fast enough and that’s a fact.

READ: Chris Perez Says He’s In the Dark When It Comes To Netflix’s ‘Selena: The Series’

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Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Things That Matter

Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Last week, Mexican feminist activists took over the National Human Rights Commissions federal building in a move to bring greater awareness to the scourge of gender-based violence and femicide that has racked Mexico for decades.

According to the federal Interior Secretariat, the statistics in Mexico have recently taken a turn for the worse.

Domestic violence against women has became an even more acute problem since the pandemic has forced women to stay insider with their abusers. Emergency distress calls reporting domestic violence have risen by 50%.

The occupation of the Human Rights building is just another chapter in the saga of the “Ni Una Menos” (Not One More Woman) movement, an anti-femicide collective born in Argentina that has steadily been gaining steam in Mexico since 2019.

In recent years, anti-femicide demonstrations have been sparked by various heinous crimes against women or girls that have been largely overlooked by law enforcement officials. 

Photo by Marcos Brindicci/Getty Images

Unfortunately, the government of Mexico has appeared to be apathetic to the wave of femicide that is overwhelming the women of their country.

Recently, when President Andrés Manuel López Obrador was asked to address Mexico’s gender violence epidemic, he demurred, stating that he didn’t “want femicide to detract” from the raffle his administration was holding for the sale of the presidential airplane.

As for the feminist activists at the heart of Ni Una Menos and the federal building occupation, the government’s failure to respond to anti-woman violence is the primary fuel for their anger. 

“We’re here so that the whole world will know that in Mexico they kill women and nobody does anything about it,” said Yesenia Zamudio to the LA Times. According to Zamudio, she is still seeking justice for the murder of her 19-year-old daughter four years ago.

The women of Mexico appear to be fed up, grasping at any and all tactics that have the potential to incite change on a grander scale.

Their tactics may seem dramatic to some, but it’s undeniable that they are no longer being ignored. As of now, the radical activists are pulling attention-grabbing stunts like decorating a portrait of Mexican Revolution leader Francisco Madero with lipstick and purple hair.

They’re also making headlines for vandalizing the federal building’s walls and splashing paint on the doors of the presidential palace.

One thing is for sure: something has to change. Otherwise, thousands of innocent women and girls will continue to be raped, abused, and murdered while their perpetrators escape with immunity. 

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