Entertainment

This Was A Rough Year And These Are The Celebrities And Icons We Were Forced To Say Goodbye To In 2020

There’s no denying that 2020 has been one hell of a year. It seemed like everyday we were waking up to some new shocking headline about the election, the pandemic, racial justice, or celebrity death.

Not only did the year 2020 take our sense of normalcy right out from under us, but it also took with it some of our most iconic and beloved stars, celebrities, and icons.

Sadly, we’ve said goodbye to too many to include all of them here but from Kobe Bryant’s fatal helicopter crash in January to the tragic loss of Glee star Naya Rivera, we have many to pay our respects to as we look back on those we lost in 2020.

Kobe Bryant

The NBA star died in a helicopter crash in Calabasas, CA, in January. Kobe was traveling with eight other people, including his 13-year-old daughter Gianna. The aircraft reportedly crashed “amid foggy conditions” and a small brush fire erupted. There were no survivors.

Naya Rivera

The Glee actress was found dead on July 13, five days after she went missing while boatingwith her 4-year-old son, Josey Dorsey (whom she shared with ex-husband Ryan Dorsey). She was 33 years old.

Ruth Badger Ginsburg

The Supreme Court justice and women’s rights pioneer died at age 87 on Sept. 18 after battling metastatic pancreatic cancer.

“Our nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said in a statement, per The New York Times. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

Chadwick Boseman

Credit: Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty Images

Chadwick Boseman, best known for his role as T’Challa/Black Panther in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, died at age 43 in August after a four-year battle with colon cancer.

His death caused an outpouring of grief from fans around the world and it’s completely altered future plans for the Black Panther series.

Regis Philbin

The famed television host died of natural causes at age 88 on July 24. He was well-known for his decades-spanning career and particularly his time on the Today show with Kathy Lee Gifford.

Natalie Desselle Reid

Deselle-Reid died in early December at age 53 after a private battle with colon cancer.

She was best known for roles on the UPN series Eve (2003-2006) and the Robert Townsend-directed 1997 comedy B.A.P.S., in which she played a waitress in Georgia who ends up caring for a Beverly Hills millionaire and living the life of “Black American Princesses.” The cult classic famously co-starred Halle Berry.

Diego Maradona

The Argentinian soccer legend died on November 25 at the age of 60. The former athlete, who famously scored the “Hand of God” goal during the 1986 World Cup, reportedly suffered a heart attack three weeks after he underwent surgery to remove a blood clot on his brain.

Alex Trebek

Sadly, the world was forced to say goodbye to iconic Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek after he battled stage four pancreatic cancer. He passed away at the age of 80 and his death was reported by the show: “Jeopardy! is saddened to share that Alex Trebek passed away peacefully at home early this morning, surrounded by family and friends,” the show’s official account tweeted on Nov. 8. “Thank you, Alex.”

Sean Connery

The actor, best known for playing James Bond, died at age 90 on Oct. 31. James Bond producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli said in a statement: “He was and shall always be remembered as the original James Bond whose indelible entrance into cinema history began when he announced those unforgettable words — ‘The name’s Bond… James Bond’ — he revolutionised the world with his gritty and witty portrayal of the sexy and charismatic secret agent. He is undoubtedly largely responsible for the success of the film series and we shall be forever grateful to him.”

Doreen Montalvo

Known for her roles in Madame Secretary and The Good Wife, Montalvo died in October of a stroke at just 56 years old.

Montalvo’s manager, Steve Maihack, said in a statement to The Hollywood Reporter. “She was having quite the year with two films in the can and a new Broadway show … but she would be so happy to know she will live on through these projects and the outpouring of love from every corner of the business.”

Anthony Galindo Ibarra

Anthony Galindo, popularly known as El Papijoe, was a popular model, singer, and actor from Venezuela. Beginning in 1995, Galindo was part of the last stage of Latino boy band Menudo along with his teammates Abel Talamántez, Alexis Grullón, and Didier Hernández. 

Galindo died at age 41 after being hospitalized for injuries suffered in a suicide attempt the previous week.

Eddie Van Halen

The Van Halen guitarist died of cancer in October. He was 65.

Little Richard

The legendary and iconic “Tutti Frutti” singer died from bone cancer on May 9. He was 87 years old.

John Lewis

Credit: Saul Loeb / Getty Images

The congressman and civil rights icon died at age 80 in July after battling stage four pancreatic cancer. John Lewis was a legend in the fight for equality and helped give hope and also real tangible rights to countless Americans in his battle for equality.

La Parka

The famous wrestler, whose real name is Jesus Alfonso Huerta Escoboza, died in January of injuries related to an in-ring accident. Reports indicate he was 54 or 55.

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These Were The Moments That Defined Latin America In 2020 That Weren’t About COVID-19

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These Were The Moments That Defined Latin America In 2020 That Weren’t About COVID-19

PEDRO PARDO/AFP via Getty Images

2020 will easily go down in manny of our memories as the year that just wouldn’t stop. As the year started, it all seemed to be sort of fine as the world came together to battle record-breaking Australian bushfires and worked to hopefully contain an outbreak of a strange new virus in China.

However, as the year comes to a close things have gone de mal a peor for the world in general, but for the Latino population in the United States and Latin America as a region in particular. Though it’s hard to realize just how much we all witnessed and experienced since so much of what happened seems like it was a lifetime ago.

Here’s a look back at some the defining moments from 2020 across Latin America.

Jennifer Lopez and Shakira kicked off the year hopeful with a history-making performance at the Super Bowl.

Yes, believe it or not, this happened in 2020. The pair put on what many have called the best half time show in Super Bowl history. They were also joined by J Balvin and Bad Bunny.

Bolivia’s Evo Morales was forced into exile, only to return to the country in November.

After being forced into exile at the end of 2019 for attempting to illegally run in upcoming presidential elections, Morales spent a year abroad – first in Mexico and then in Argentina.

Mexico’s President AMLO made his first trip abroad to visit Donald Trump at the White House.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is a staunch populist and has long said his primary focus is domestic policy within Mexico. Therefore, despite two years in office, AMLO hadn’t left Mexico once. So it came as a surprise when his first trip abroad was a visit to the U.S. leader who had long disparaged Mexico, the government, and Mexicans – not to mention his trip came in the middle of a global pandemic.

Migrant caravans continued to make their way towards the U.S. despite interference from Mexico and Covid-19.

Migrants attempting to make their way to the U.S. isn’t unique to 2020. For decades, migrants have long banded together for safety in numbers along the treacherous journey to the north. However, they became larger and better organized in 2020, perhaps owing to the new dangers of Mexican interference.

Mexico’s AMLO vowed to stop migrants from reaching the U.S.-Mexico border, adhering to Trump’s request. It was also noteworthy because the caravans continued despite the Covid-19 crisis, which has hit the region particularly hard.

Peru saw three presidents in the span of a few weeks after massive protests.

Peru is facing one of the greatest crises the nation has faced. Just as the country seemed to be emerging from the worst of its battle against the Covid-19 pandemic, the country has entered a severe political crisis.

The country’s elected president, Martin Vizcarra, was impeached and removed from office. His predecessor responded with a heavy hand to the protests that ensued resulting in his resignation less than 24 hours later. The government then had to find someone willing to take the job which proved to be a tough sell.

In fact, massive protests swept across Latin America.

From Mexico in the north to Cuba in the Caribbean and Chile in the south, protests were seen all across the region. Although each movement had it’s own stated goal and objectives, many were largely borne out of the same purpose: to fight back against corruption.

Brazil’s President Jaír Bolsonaro tested positive for Covid-19 but it did nothing to change his approach to the pandemic.

Jaír Bolsonaro has long been compared to Donald Trump, with many calling him the Donald Trump of South America. The two were also strongly aligned in their responses to the Coronavirus pandemic, with the pair largely downplaying the severity of the crisis.

Then, Bolsonaro became infected with the virus and many hoped it would change his view on the crisis. It didn’t.

A growing feminist movement developed in Mexico, demanding protection from a shocking rise in violence against women.

Mexico has long been battling endemic violence and the country has continued to see record-setting rates of homicides. But it was the growing rate of violence against women, particularly femicide, that gained national attention.

Women banded together and started large nationwide protests. Over the summer, women in the capital of Mexico City occupied government buildings and destroyed many of the city’s most popular monuments to hopefully get their message across. Although the movement has gained more recognition by Mexicans, the government has still failed to address their concerns. Let’s hope things are different in 2021.

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COVID-19 Deaths Among Young Latinos Are Skyrocketing And It’s Having Major Impacts On Our Community

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COVID-19 Deaths Among Young Latinos Are Skyrocketing And It’s Having Major Impacts On Our Community

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

In what seems like a never ending saga and yet a blink of an eye at the same time, 2020 has been a devastating year for so many. The Coronavirus pandemic has snaked its way through the lives of Latinos across the country, leaving illness, sorrow, pain, and death in its wake.

Few communities have been as impacted by the pandemic as the Latino community. As of Dec. 23, Covid-19 had killed more than 54,000 Latinos, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s COVID Tracking Project, which acknowledges that its numbers are incomplete.

So many of our tíos and primos, even our own mothers and fathers, work in jobs that are considered essential and they’re bearing the brunt of the pandemic’s toll on workers.

Meanwhile, the virus has destroyed the foundations built by our families through hard work to give us – the younger generation – a better future.

Young Latinos are being hit particularly hard by the latest surge in COVID-19 deaths.

It was obvious from the beginning of the pandemic that those already worse off were going to be most impacted by the virus. And that’s exactly what happened. Covid-19 thrived on many Latinos’ roles as “essential workers” and it exploited the long-standing gaps compared to white Americans in income, education and access to health care.

The virus immediately had an outsized impact on our community, since so many of us suffer from higher rates of diabetes, hypertension and higher rates of obesity while having less savings and lower wealth, as well as limited business capital.

Meanwhile, the virus has worked to undo generations of progress made by our families in making sure that younger Latinos have strong foundations to work toward a better economic standing.

Gabriel Sanchez, of the University of New Mexico Center for Social Policy, told NBC News that “The only state where Latinos are not overrepresented in cases and casualties is in New Mexico, and that is because Native Americans have been hammered.”

An even more shocking truth is that Covid-19 has been more deadly for young Latinos than other racial groups. Latinos have the greatest share of deaths in age groups under 54, according to CDC data, while among whites, the greatest share of deaths has occurred in age groups over 65.

So many young Latinos work in jobs that are now considered essential and can’t stay home.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, young and working-age adults were hit hard. Covid-19 spread like wildfire in many of the fields that os many young Latinos work in: service industries, farm work, meat plant workers, grocery stores, and healthcare. This grim reality is reflected in the data.

Among Americans who are 35 to 44, almost half (48.9 percent) of those who died were Latino, compared to 27.3 percent of Black people and 15.5 percent of whites, according to an analysis of 226,240 deaths using CDC data.

By contrast, in the 65-74 age group, 45.3 percent killed by Covid-19 were white, 24.7 percent were Black and 23.1 percent were Latino.

For many families, the pandemic has turned back the progress made by earlier generations.

Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The pandemic and the death it’s brought along with it, has undone so much of the valuable progress made by our families. Before Covid-19 hit, our community had bounced back from the economic blow of the Great Recession.

In fact, between 2016 and 2019, wealth among Latino and Black families grew faster than that of other groups, though they still had far to go to catch up to white families, whose median family wealth last year was $188,200, compared to $36,100 for Hispanics and $24,100 for Blacks.

Before the pandemic, Latino unemployment was at 4 percent, but then soared to 19 percent in April. It fell back to 8.4 percent in November, but it’s still double the pre-pandemic rate.

Latino businesses were the engine driving small-business growth, and some had been adding jobs until the pandemic hit. Now, more jobs have been lost in several industry sectors with disproportionately higher rates of Latino-owned businesses — such as food services — than in the private sector overall, according to the Urban Institute.

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