Entertainment

Netflix Star Carolina Ramirez Is More Than Just A Stellar Actress, She’s A Social Media Highlight

If you’re Colombian then you already know about the talented Carolina Ramirez. If not, you must watch all 82 episodes of La Reina del Flow on Netflix and learn about her skills. All it takes is a deep social media dive, which we all seem to have time for these days, to find out that she is so much more than her character on the Netflix show. Here’s what we’ve been able to gather about the Colombian actress.

Meet Carolina Ramirez.

@reinadelflowtv / Instagram

Netflix purchased the Colombian telenovela of the year and all 82 episodes are streaming, featuring this beautiful angel. I know you miss telenovelas now that cable is a relic of the past generation.

She’s stunning, and the world is starting to take notice.

@carocali / Instagram

So many people are hoping that she will be the love of their lives but she’s pretty busy right now so just hold tight.

Who doesn’t have a thing for strong mujeres?

@carocali / Instagram

In La Reina del Flow, she’s plays Yeimy Montoya, a girl who was wronged by Charly Flow. Don’t worry, after he frames her and puts her in jail for 17 years, she comes back as an undercover DEA agent and ruins his life. ????

Baby Carolina was a tortured ballerina.

@carocali / Instagram

Caption: “Año 99… La Habana Cuba. ENA. Dias muy difíciles de mi vida…de mucho trabajo, de mucha entrega y sacrificio.”

Today is a dancing star on Canción para Dueto.

@carocali / Instagram

Teatro Colón describes the Colombian play as “a perfect and unforgettable mix of silence, music, surreal humor and a body placed on the edge of the abyss. The stage is poetically constructed and is used for an eternal wake, an old house in the middle of a solitary place that transforms subtly into a furious sea, into a room where everything comes to life, where an overflowing party will happen, where a woman will transform in bird, where a demented game of apparitions and disappearances will take over everything.”

Her selfie game is something we should aspire to.

@carocali / Instagram

After you watch her play a tough woman on “La Reina del Flow,” you might be surprised to see all of the photos of her smiling and happy.

She also has a sense of humor.

@carocali / Instagram

Carolina is of the people. Don’t expect to see a Kardashian-esque feed when you visit her social media pages. She is more about being real than fake and “perfect.”

Ramirez has never been afraid to show her true face.

@carocali / Instagram

Actually, this is her Instagram avatar picture. You won’t find a single childhood photo that proves she was a happy child. She’s been plotting revenge since Day 1.

It’s kind of perfect when you see them.

@carocali / Instagram

Let’s not discuss the creepy clown that is probably causing her to make this face. Let’s instead marvel at the fact that every Latina grew up with this haircut.

This Gemini beauty is 35 years old.

@carocali / Instagram

Ramirez will be the first to post a photo of her getting skin rejuvenation work done. Like with surgical marker all over her face. She’s the most transparent queen you’ll see.

Her skillset as a dancer and singer make her a Renaissance woman of Colombia.

@carocali / Instagram

Carloina Ramirez was made famous in La Pola and is basically huge in the Colombian telenovela world. She has also starred in La hija del mariachi.

While she’s a rapper queen in La Reina del Flow, she’s plays a salsa queen en Ciudad delirio.

@carocali / Instagram

She plays Angie, a salsa dancer who has her own salsa school. She meets Javier, a Spanish pharmacologist away on a business trip to Colombia where the two fall in love.

Before you get too ahead of yourself, she is happily married.

@carocali / Instagram

Ramirez has been married to an Argentine businessman, named Mariano Bacaleinik since 2010.

She’s like super close with her brother.

@carocali / Instagram

Caption: “Cuando quiero estar de buen humor pienso en este man… mi hermano. No siempre nos la llevamos bien; tuvimos momentos de confrontación (con sangre incluida) como la mayoría de hermanos.”

English: “When I want to be in a good mood I think about this man … my brother. We do not always get along well; We had moments of confrontation (with blood included) like most siblings.”

“Te amo hermano, mi vida habría sido incompleta sin vos.”

@carocali / Instagram

For no reason whatsoever, Carolina Ramirez will tell the Instagram world how much she loves her hermanito.

Caption: “El querernos incondicionalmente lo aprendimos con los años, pero fundamentado en todos los momentos (buenos y malos) que estuvimos juntos como familia desde mis tres años cuando llegó a ocupar un lugar reservado y exclusivo en mi corazón. Él no cumple años hoy, no está enfermo ni estamos tan lejos. Hoy es un día cualquiera en el que se me dió por decirte: te amo hermano, mi vida habría sido incompleta sin vos ❤️????”

Ramirez also likes to wear beards in public.

@carocali / Instagram

I mean, this post is about how hermosa and how dorky this human is. Maybe it’s to disguise her fame in public, maybe it’s just because.

It’s just a thing she does.

@carocali / Instagram

There are so many photos of her on social media wearing fake facial hair in public. It’s kind of amazing how well she can pull it off.

Like our moms, she has to keep her facial hair under control.

@carocali / Instagram

Caption: “Nada como tener onda en santorini y no tener bigote de bronceado en tus vacaciones #lapropiapiquiñadevacas”

She might be the goofiest, non-serious artist in existence right now.

@carocali / Instagram

You just can’t imagine that this woman takes herself too seriously. She takes narcoleptic naps in the midst of art projects, and the people around her know that she not only wouldn’t care about this photo op, but that she’d post it on the internet to her 700k followers.

You can watch 61 hours of Ramirez on Netflix right now.

@carocali / Twitter

Trust that La Reina del Flow was picked up for a Part 2 for next summer. Watch with abandon.


READ: Isabella Gomez From ‘One Day At A Time’ Is Humbled To Be An Icon To The Latinx LGBTQ Community

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Once A Cartel Hub, Colombia’s Medellín Has Become A City Of The Future

Culture

Once A Cartel Hub, Colombia’s Medellín Has Become A City Of The Future

Medellín, Colombia was once home to one of the world’s most powerful cartels – Pablo Escobar’s Medellín Cartel. During the ’90s, drug gangs and guerrilla fighters controlled the city’s streets and few people ventured out the relative safety of their immediate neighborhoods.

That Medellín is a distant memory for many Paisas thanks to the fall of the cartels, but also to a distinct set of ideals and values that have shaped the city’s development over the last decade.

Medellín was named the world’s third city of the future and it’s leading in so many categories.

Medellín is nestled in a valley high in the Andes, and many of the city’s poorest residents live in comunas they built on the steep slopes. And although the city still struggles with high rates of poverty, city planners are working to bridge the divide between these poor communities with little access to public amenities and the core of Medellín.

The technology that helped save Medellín is not what you’d see in San Francisco, Boston or Singapore—fleets of driverless cars, big tech companies and artificial intelligence. It is about gathering data to make informed decisions on how to deploy technology where it has the most impact. 

Where most smart-city ­initiatives are of, by and, to a large extent, for the already tech-savvy and well-resourced segment of the population, Medellín’s transformation has for the most part been focused on people who have the least.

The city’s cable car system is one out of sci-fi novels.

Think of a gondola suspended under a cable, floating high off the ground as it hauls a cabin full of passengers up a long, steep mountain slope. To most people, the image would suggest ski resorts and pricey vacations. To the people who live in the poor mountainside communities once known as favelas at the edges of Medellín, the gondola system is a lifeline, and a powerful symbol of an extraordinary urban transformation led by technology and data.

“The genius of the Metrocable is that it actually serves the poor and integrates them into the city, gives them access to jobs and other opportunities,” says Julio Dávila, a Colombian urban planner at University College London. “Nobody had ever done that before.” As people of all classes started using the cars to visit “bad” neighborhoods, they became invested in their city’s fate, heralding a decade of some of the world’s most innovative urban planning

Designers have created safe spaces for all with parks and libraries.

The Metrocable succeeded in connecting Medellín’s poorest neighborhoods to the rest of the city – but where would they hang out? This lead to the construction of five libraries sprinkled throughout Medellín, all surrounded by beautiful greenery. These “library-parks” were among the first safe public spaces many neighborhoods had ever seen. 

The key ingredient of Medellín’s transformation, experts agree, is perspective: The city looked beyond technology as an end in itself. Instead, it found ways to integrate technological and social change into an overall improvement in daily life that was felt in all corners of the city—and especially where improvement was most needed. “Medellín’s vision of itself as a smart city broke from the usual paradigms of hyper-modernization and automation,” says Robert Ng Henao, an economist who heads a smart-city department at the University of Medellín.

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The Colombian City Where Body Parts Wash Up On The Shore So Often It’s Become Normal

Things That Matter

The Colombian City Where Body Parts Wash Up On The Shore So Often It’s Become Normal

Colombia has made incredible progress since the 1990’s when the country was a hotbed for international drug trafficking and guerrilla warfare. Today, modern bustling cities are home to shopping centers, museums, and hordes of international visitors.

However, despite the advancements, the country is still in a delicate peace deal with the main guerrilla oppossition – Las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) – and there are many other paramilitary groups that still operate across the country, including in the main port city of Buenavista.

The city of Buenavista is seeing an uptick in body parts washing up along its shores.

In mid-January, an arm washed up on the city’s shore. It was quickly assumed, by local media reports, that the arm belonged to one of three local fisherman who had most likely been rounded up, killed, and dismembered. The arm had a tattoo on it, connecting it to one of the missing men, Armando Valencia.

And it wasn’t the first time this has happened. According to residents, body parts washing up on beaches is a tragically familiar occurrence. “There were some reports of body parts washing up at La Bocana [a nearby tourist spot]. A head, a leg, an arm,” said María Miyela Riascos, a social leader from Buenaventura, in a statement to VICE News. “Also, they found a man and a woman dismembered in the rural area of Bajo Calima.”

Violence has been rampant in Buenaventura for decades. The city has some of the highest rates of forced displacement and homicide in the country. But seldom has it been confronted by the levels of brutality experienced in the past year.

Criminal groups have long terrorized the city but things seem to be out of control.

So many different criminal groups have terrorized the slums of Colombia’s main Pacific port that residents rarely bother to learn the name of the latest clan in control. They simply call the warring gangs los malos or the bad guys.

Three people have been killed or disappeared daily, and conflict between organized crime has displaced as many as 6,000 people. Videos on Twitter show people fleeing their homes and young men and women patrolling with assault weapons. #SOSbuenaventura has been trending.

Community leaders see darker interests behind the violence, saying the areas where most crimes occur are the same where plans have been laid for a waterfront project, an airport and seaport terminals. “I see the violence as a means of pressure to get us off this area so they can build their projects,” Armando Valencia told The Guardian.

Criminals use “chop houses” to dismember their victims.

Colombian navy special forces on patrol among stilted waterfront shacks in Buenaventura
Credit: Fernando Vergara / Getty Images

The criminals recruit children, extort businesses, force people from their homes and dismember live victims, scattering their remains in the bay or surrounding jungle. Dozens of wooden huts balanced precariously on stilts over the bay have been abandoned by terrorized citizens and taken over by the gangs for use as casas de pique, or chop houses, where they torture and murder their victims.

The chop houses are the most gruesome consequence of a deeply flawed attempt to dismantle rightwing militias, which originally emerged to combat leftwing guerrillas in collusion with state security forces and drug traffickers.

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