Entertainment

Haters Have Been Coming For Cardi B For Her Latinidad And She Clapped Back In Instagram Video

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Cardi B is in the news…a lot. Whether she’s releasing new music, talking about her plastic surgery, kid, or mounting legal problems, it seems like every day we get a new headline about the rapper.

And this time isn’t any different.

But the “Press” singer is in the news today because she had a few choice words for people who are questioning her identity.

Cardi B had some serious words for people who say she can’t be both black and speak Spanish.

Credit: @Complex / Twitter

Cardi B has faced a lot of criticism from listeners since she first rose to fame with “Bodak Yellow.” Now apparently, people are coming for her because she speaks Spanish but identifies as Black.

The rapper was giving on her favorite social media platform, Instagram giving a live session. In it, she talked about how she’s mistaken for Mexican because she speaks Spanish. “I’m not Mexican at all. I’m West Indian and I’m Dominican. I speak Spanish because I’m Dominican,” Cardi explained. “And it’s like, ‘So what’s the difference between Dominican and Mexican?’ And it’s like, everything!” And she’s totally right.

From there she circled back to the assumption that she’s not black.

“People just don’t be understanding shit. It’s like, ‘Cardi’s Latin, she’s not Black.’ And it’s like, ‘Bro, my features don’t come from…white people f*cking, OK?’ And they always wanna race-bait when it comes to me…I have Afro features,” she continued. “‘Oh, but your parents are light-skinned’ – alright, but my grandparents aren’t.”

She added that a lot of other artists haven’t faced the same criticism due to the darker complexion of their skin. “It’s crazy because some island women, some artists that are from the same islands as me, people will be like, ‘Oh they’re Black,'” she said. “But because Cardi speaks Spanish to people, she’s not Black, even though we have similar features, same skin complexion. But no, they want to not put Cardi in it because I speak Spanish.”

Also, don’t people get that people other than Mexicans also speak Spanish…?

Credit: PrintableSpanish.com

Like seriously, from Spain to the Philippines, parts of Africa, and nearly all of Latin America and much of the Caribbean – Spanish is the third most widely spoken language in the world. Obviously, it’s going to encompass a wide array of cultures, identities, and communities.

Some on Twitter were obviously in need of a history lesson.

Credit: @Complex

When Africans were shipped across the Atlantic Ocean like cargo, they were taken all over the Americas. Yes, most ended up in the British colonies of the present-day United States but many were taken to Spanish-speaking colonies, especially in the Caribbean.

Quite a few people tried laying out the facts right there on Twitter.

Credit: @Complex

Read: Speaking Spanish doesn’t make a person not Black.

To many, the argument got personal.

Credit: @Complex / Twitter

Is anyone gonna go tell this person’s abuelo that he isn’t black just because he speaks Spanish…? Nope? Didn’t think so.

But a lot of people came out on Twitter standing by those who say she can’t identify as Black.

For many, it’s about identity and the struggles that the African-American community has gone through.

While at least one Twitter user summed it up like this:

We’re all Black. And not many people seemed to disagree with them – unless of course it meant Cardi B is Black too.

READ: Cardi B Is Pro-Bernie Sanders But She’s Still Keeping Her Options Open For 2020

Hispanic Heritage Month Is Meant To Celebrate Spanish-Speaking Cultures, But What Does That Mean In The Age Of Trump?

Culture

Hispanic Heritage Month Is Meant To Celebrate Spanish-Speaking Cultures, But What Does That Mean In The Age Of Trump?

This week is the start of a month long commemoration of Latino culture as Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, kicks off across the U.S. Compared to Black History Month, Women’s History Month, and Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hispanic Heritage Month starts in the middle of a month. This is due to September 15 and 16 marking the independence days of Costa Rica, Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala and El Salvador. 

The annual observance started back in in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson’s administration as a one-week celebration called Hispanic Heritage Week. It wouldn’t be until years later that President Ronald Reagan proposed extending this celebration into a month-long event. On Aug. 17, 1988, it was put into law officially designating the 30-day period starting on Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month.

But in the age of Trump where anti-Latino sentiments run high, what does this month truly represent beyond just a marketing opportunity for companies to cash in on our culture?

Credit:@itseduardosolis/Twitter

For the next few weeks, Latinos will be at the forefront when it comes to “representation”. In other words, Latinos will be involved in marketing campaigns, corporate social media accounts will attempt to tweet in Spanish and sugar skulls will be all the rage at your local Target. That’s Hispanic Heritage Month in 2019 and something doesn’t seem right about that. 

The problem with Hispanic Heritage Month is that it represents almost everything that our culture isn’t about. That starts with the name itself, Hispanic, which came into use after the 1980 Census to refer to Spanish and Latin American descendants living in the U.S. It’s this lumping of all Latino people under the Hispanic umbrella, whether it applies to us or not, that is problematic. It leaves out countless of groups of people like those who identify as Afro-Latino or Indigenous that are constantly overlooked or never given any representation whatsoever. 

Beyond just the name, the question of it’s purpose and its meaning in this day and age also comes into play. In reality, most Latinos don’t need a month to be acknowledged or be at the forefront of a marketing campaign to feel accepted. Most celebrate their cultural pride every single day.

Hispanic Heritage Month was created by and promoted by the U.S. government to show that we “arrived” as people in this country. Yet in the 31 years since HHM started, Latinos have more than just arrived. We have made ourselves at home and have contributed to U.S. culture, science and art in ways that deserve more than just a month when brands pander to us. 

While some look at Hispanic Heritage Month as a time to celebrate maybe it can serve a better purpose by letting us tell our own narrative for once. 

Credit:@ric_galvan/Twitter

The purpose of Hispanic Heritage Month needs a reboot rather than some faux-celebration about ethnic representation. Instead, the month should focus on how to move our communities forward and how we can share our own narratives and stories. 

For a population group that makes up 18.1% of the total U.S. population, representation has been hard to come by in recent years. The majority of this visibility has been succumbed to President Trump’s antipathy towards Latinos and demonization of migrant groups coming from the Southern border. Then came Aug. 3, when a shooter inspired by the President Trump anti-Latino rhetoric killed 22 people in El Paso. The deadly shooting sent shock waves to Latino communities across the country and placing fear in the minds of many. While this isn’t the first time Latinos have been targeted, the attack represented divisiveness that has once again reared it’s ugly head. 

Yet instead of living in fear, the best response can only be one of visibility and solidarity. The truth of the matter is that Latinos never needed government validation or permission to share our heritage, no matter what month of the year it may be. 

Rather than waste a month grasping onto what others perceive us as, we should embrace our own stories and bring to light the issues we face everyday. In reality, no month long celebration will ever validate our experiences or our stories. But as long as we have the platform, let’s make the best use of it and share our own narratives for once. 

READ: Latinos Are Still Waiting For Their Own Movie Moment As Hollywood Tries Casting More Diverse Films

The Real-Life ‘Hustler’ Isn’t Thrilled Over J.Lo’s Depiction Of Her and Said Cardi B Should Have Played Her

Entertainment

The Real-Life ‘Hustler’ Isn’t Thrilled Over J.Lo’s Depiction Of Her and Said Cardi B Should Have Played Her

Jennifer Lopez cannot believe the incredibly positive reviews she’s getting over her lead role in the film “Hustlers.” She was so moved that she cried on national TV. Last week while being interviewed by Hoda Kotb, Lopez expressed her emotional reaction over the surprising reviews for her role, which some critics say could get her an Acadamy Award nomination. Here’s just a snippet of what film critics are saying about the film that made a big debut this weekend. “Hustlers asks what a movie like Goodfellas looks like with women at the center of the story,” one film critic said. “If nothing else, we get to see Jennifer Lopez command the screen as easily as Ramona does the stage, offering up a seductive awards-worthy performance that makes us remember why she became a movie star in the first place,” another said

There is at least one person who isn’t raving about Lopez’s role, and that’s the one who inspired the film. 

Samantha Barbash, the woman who inspired “Hustlers,” said she would have liked to have seen Cardi B in the lead role instead of Jennifer Lopez. 

Credit: Instagram/@iam_missfoxita

The 45-year-old said in an interview with Hollywood Life that rapper Cardi B should have portrayed her instead of the veteran actress, even though this is Cardi’s first film. “I said it from day one, even to the producer. Cardi doesn’t have the acting skills that Jennifer does, but Cardi could relate more to who I was because even though she wasn’t in the same club, we were in the same industry,” she told the lifestyle website. “If Cardi took some acting lessons and shadowed me, I’m sure that she would have played a better role for my character.”

Barbash goes on to say that she is flattered that Lopez wanted to play her in a movie but stresses that the film got several things wrong about her. 

Credit: Instagram/@iam_missfoxita

For starters, Barbash wasn’t a stripper at all. The film, based on a 2015 New York magazine article, shows Lopez as a stripper who ends up drugging wealthy bankers and robs them of their money. However, Barbash said she was never a stripper. Barbash actually worked at a strip club in New York City as a hostess. Yes, the other stuff about the drugs and taking their money is correct, but seeing Lopez play her a stripper didn’t sit well with her. Barbash also said that Lopez never reached out to her in order to learn about her mannerisms, which is what actors do when they’re portraying real-life characters. Even when the real-life character is deceased, actors still study old footage to learn more about the role they are playing. You may recall the extensive research Lopez said she did to portray Selena Quintanilla. She even slept in her bed to get into deep character.  

Earlier this year, Barbash said she would release her own memoir about the ordeal (which she did) that got her 5 years probation and said she planned to sue the filmmakers. 

Credit: Instagram/@iam_missfoxita

“This is a living nightmare,” Barbash said in April in the New York Post after videos leaked of Lopez on a stripper pole. “So now I’m going to have to do a lawsuit. I’m getting a gag order.” Bruno Gioffre, also said back then, that Barbash was “considering all legal avenues with the possibility injunctive relief, including a lawsuit.” The movie was made despite her legal threats. Today, Barbash is an entrepreneur and owns her own spa business. 

We can see why she would have preferred to see Cardi B in the title role. 

Credit: Instagram/@iamcardib

The Bronx rapper did admit to drugging men and robbing them, just like the characters did in the movie “Hustlers.” In 2017, Barbash was charged for conspiracy, assault, and grand larceny in exchange for five years probation

In March, Card admitted on social media that during her stint as a stripper in New York she too did what the “Hustlers” did in the movie. “I had to go strip, I had to go, ‘Oh yeah, you want to f*ck me? Yeah, yeah, yeah, let’s go to this hotel,’ and I drugged n*****s up and I robbed them. That’s what I used to do.” 

Soon after that post, Cardi said she it was wrong of her to do that and has since tried to make a better life for herself. 

READ: Critics Think Jennifer Lopez Gave An Oscar-Worthy Performance In ‘Hustlers’