Entertainment

Bravo’s ‘Texicanas’ Premiered This Week And People Are Already Clapping Back Against Racists

A few months ago, Bravo teased a new addition to its collection of reality television dramas. “Texicanas” is exactly what you would expect it to be. As the name implies, it follows six Mexican-American women living in San Antonio, Texas (Tejanas). Like any other Real Housewives show, the women are rich, beautiful and trying to keep up their social lives. Unlike those shows, these women are speaking in Spanglish, and navigating Tejana-specific problems like green cards, cultural expectations of women, and domestic violence.

The series premiered Tuesday night after “Mexican Dynasties” and viewers’ feelings are all over the place–upset about the production, casting and what it means to be a San Antonian woman.

Mexican-Americans everywhere are feeling seen.

@aleppolly / Twitter

Or heard rather? Seriously, expect your language to be spoken and to learn a few new words in the process. Bravo TV is out here dubbing out every other Spanish word coming out of their mouths but giving us the subtitles.

Some of us are living life on the edge by just watching the show.

@vanedivinaa / Twitter

Yeah, that feeling never seems to go away? So many of us didn’t even know these were curse words growing up because our mami’s were always chismosando. That slap upside the head is the only way to learn what’s wrong and right to say.

Other Latinos were disappointed with the lack of Mexican food in the show.

@9woodMac / Twitter

So much of Latino culture is the family drama happening around a léchon only for the hangry tíos to calm down after eating. Food dictates the drama. We get it, but also, we can eat salads for lunch and still be Latino.

So, we all expected drama from the cast, but the drama is going down in Twitter threads as well.

@bossiinina / Twitter

Let’s face it, comadres, we’re all watching reality TV for the chisme and to feel better about our own lives. Some of these viewers who took to Twitter could use a mirror.

Some people are really dragging the network for their casting calls.

@TT7N9 / Twitter

Dayum. This is how to let people know how you really feel. Like, maybe some people are just being mean to be mean. The internet is perfect for that. However, some times people just don’t like seeing themselves and their communities wrongly represented.

Texas + Mexicana = Texicanas

@stephanie_wins / Twitter

Some folks are having a hard time with a Mexican cast on a show that is so obviously meant to include a cast that’s navigating two cultures. You can’t have one without the other.

Anayancy is the only woman who isn’t a U.S. citizen just yet.

@ericccdean / Twitter

Every woman has her own story. Some were born in the U.S. but grew up in Mexico. Others were born and raised in Texas. Anayancy Nolasco is still waiting for her citizenship to come through. She lives in San Antonio with her daughter, Ellie.

San Antonians are clapping back louder than the racists to prove a point.

@kesleavictoriaa / Twitter

San Antonio is a diverse city. It was once Mexican territory. All this border conflict is human-made. This is a show about people and how they navigate that conflict.

Other fans are taking a moment to straight laugh at the racists.

@RaquelVivienne / Twitter

If your problem is that the women are Mexican, then maybe you should open your eyes and stop discounting the brown people that make up the majority of your city. Just a very rational thought to leave here.

A few Latinas have complained that the women don’t represent their Latinidad.

@melanese_ / Twitter

Representation is important, claro. BUT–let our people act as wild and crazy as all the other white people in Real Housewives. We deserve cheesy rom-coms with tropes, meaningful films and trash TV like the rest of the U.S.

“Mexican Dynasties” fans feel the bar has been set too high to let “Texicanas” be.

@coletteLala / Twitter

Many folks on Twitter were calling for a full season of “Mexican Dynasties” instead of “Texicanas.” We’re going to give the show more time for the plot to develop.

Frankly, a good fraction of complainers had it in for production, not the cast.

@Paul_0808 / Twitter

It’s hard to say if the “formula” of “Mexican Dynasties” that @coletteLALA was referring to is the actual editing formula. There’s no question that “Texicanas” is trying something different.

It seems to be a mix of script and ‘reality.’

@Jacqueliinee02 @KeirnThomas / Twitter

One of the women, Penny, narrates the entire series. If you saw the teaser trailer, expect a lot more of that. The viewership is split on whether we like it or not.

This realist has a message for the pessimists out there.

@ninaluna1126 / Twitter

And that message is: drink more tequila and keep watching. Have you seen the show yet?

You can tune in to “Texicanas” debut season on Bravo, Tuesday nights.

Bravo / YouTube

It’s what we’ll be talking chisme about Wednesday mornings for the foreseeable future. If you watched the first episode, what did you think? Comment below.

READ: Fans Of ‘Mexican Dynasties’ Can’t Stop Talking About Raquel Calling A Child Ugly To His Face

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Mexican President Criticizes DEA For Role In Former Army Chief’s Arrest

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Mexican President Criticizes DEA For Role In Former Army Chief’s Arrest

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador criticized the historic role of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in Mexico after a former Mexican army chief was arrested Thursday in Los Angeles on drug charges at the request of the DEA.

The former Mexican Defense Minister was arrested by the DEA on drug charges.

Salvador Cienfuegos Zepedas was the secretary of National Defense in the government of President Enrique Peña Nieto from 2012 to 2018. President Lopez Obrador claims that the arrest is proof of corruption from past governments.

President Lopez Obrador used the arrest to criticize the U.S. government and the DEA.

President Lopez Obrador, speaking at a press conference in Oaxaca, claimed that there is a double standard. While Cienfuegos Zepedas has been arrested by the DEA, the president claims U.S. officials have not been held accountable for trafficking arms into Mexico to track them to the cartels. According to the president, Mexican officials are being held at a higher and harsher standard than U.S. officials.

“Why is it that it’s just the people in Mexico who took part in these acts being accused or implicated, and (the DEA) aren’t criticizing themselves, reflecting on the meddling by all these agencies in Mexico,” Lopez Obrador said at the press conference. “They came into the country with complete freedom, they did whatever they wanted.”

The former defense minister’s arrest sent shockwaves through Mexico.

Cienfuegos Zepedas was the first high-ranking Mexican military official to be arrested in the U.S. with drug-related corruption. He was arrested at the Los Angeles International Airport and will be facing drug and money-laundering charges. It’s been less than a year since Genaro Garcia Luna was charged with taking bribes from the Sinaloa drug cartel led by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

President Lopez Obrador wants to protect the military’s reputation.

Lopez Obrador also said he hopes that the armed forces aren’t blamed for this scandal and that Mexico must take care of institutions as important as the Secretary of National Defense. Mexico does not currently have an ongoing investigation of the retired general and will await the result of the U.S. investigation, according to the president of Mexico. 

Cienfuegos Zepedas is due to make a court appearance related to four charges in California on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020.

READ: This Is What Mexico’s AMLO Wants From The Pope For The Churches Crimes Against Indigenous Mexicans

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We Have a Conversation With Bachelorette Clare Crawley About Diversity, Her Identity, and Her Status As the First Latina Lead: ‘I Embrace It’

Entertainment

We Have a Conversation With Bachelorette Clare Crawley About Diversity, Her Identity, and Her Status As the First Latina Lead: ‘I Embrace It’

Photo: ABC/Maarten de Boer

When Clare Crawley was announced in March as the newest “Bachelorette” for the popular reality TV series, the media wanted to focus on one thing and one thing only: her age. At 39-years-old, Crawley is the show’s oldest Bachelorette to date. And the network doesn’t want you to forget it. 

Promo materials included Crawley posing as Mrs. Robinson from “The Graduate”. The tagline was “It’s about time” (Because she’s waited so long…get it? Yeah, neither do we). The resounding narrative was that, because of her age, this is her last chance at love. Which, for the record, is patently false.

Photo: ABC/Maarten de Boer

But coincidentally Crawley has another, much more exciting “first” under her belt: born to an American father and a Mexican mother, Clare Crawley is the franchise’s first Latina Bachelorette.

In an exclusive interview with Mitú, Crawley told us that her status as the first Latina Bachelorette is a happy accident. “That’s not something that was ever really brought up to me or ever even made a point,” she said of her casting. But it is a coincidence that she fully embraces. “I would gladly take the Latina Bachelorette!” she said, laughing. “That’s way better than saying I’m the oldest Bachelorette!”

Crawley knows that her fair-haired, light-skinned appearance might confuse some viewers about her heritage. When asked if she ever struggled with her identity (as many children of mixed-race parents have reported), Crawley said she never had that problem. “No, no, no. I embraced it. This is something that I’ve always talked about, it’s part of my everyday life.”

Crawley went on to describe the customs and traditions she experiences as a woman of Mexican descent. “My mom speaks Spanish all the time and lots of foods we ate growing up [were Mexican]. It was definitely something in my life throughout.”

Photo: clarecrawley/Instagram

She then lovingly described her favorite (and familiar) Mexican tradition: making tamales with her (five!) older sisters during Christmastime. “And when I say we make tamales, I mean, we literally make like 12 dozen of them. So, we make them for all our friends, everyone wants them.”

Although Clare grew up in a mixed-race household, she explained that she was largely unaware of the challenges her mother faced as a Mexican woman trying to make a life for herself in conservative Georgia.

“Back in the day, just because [my mother’s] skin was darker, people [in Georgia] didn’t talk to her. People didn’t want to hang out with her. It was really hard for her,” Crawley told Mitú. “It was something I didn’t realize affected her…Because when you think of racism or that kind of stuff, it’s not just towards one race.” Crawley’s family ended up moving to Sacramento–a community that proved to be more accepting of her mother’s heritage.

Photo: ABC/Craig Sjodin

Crawley, for her part, knows that when many people think of a “typical” Latina woman, the image of her isn’t the first one that comes to mind. But as we know, there is no such thing as a “typical” Latina.

“[People] look at my skin color, they look at my hair color, or eye color, and automatically just say: ‘Oh, this white girl’. And they’ll make jokes and they’ll make off-handed things like that, but they have no idea. And I speak up, and I say it, and I defend it because it’s definitely something I’m proud of.”

And to the critics that say she’s “not Latina enough” because of the way she looks, she pays them no mind. “I think that’s their problem, not mine,” she says. “Because there’s no denying what my genetics and my DNA are. So if people have a problem with it or challenge it or question it, I think it’s just ignorant.”

Photo: ABC/Craig Sjodin

As for “The Bachelor” franchise and their push for more diversity (they finally casted their first Black “Bachelor”), Clare is hopeful. “I want people to be aware, more and more, that it’s 2020 and here moving forward…embrace diversity. Because everybody, every age, every shape, everything you can imagine, people in general are worthy of love.”

And as for the future Bachelorette (which if rumors are to be believed, will come sooner rather than later), Crawley has this piece of advice for her: “Follow your gut.”

“At the end of the day, you need to do what’s best for yourself,” she explained to Mitú. “Because you’re the one you have to go to bed with at night. Your conscience, your heart is the one that you have to live with…You have to live your life in a way that honors yourself. So, stand by that and you won’t regret it.”

You can catch “The Bachelorette” every Tuesday on ABC at 8p.m.

*This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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