Entertainment

Bravo’s ‘Texicanas’ Premiered This Week And People Are Already Clapping Back Against Racists

A few months ago, Bravo teased a new addition to its collection of reality television dramas. “Texicanas” is exactly what you would expect it to be. As the name implies, it follows six Mexican-American women living in San Antonio, Texas (Tejanas). Like any other Real Housewives show, the women are rich, beautiful and trying to keep up their social lives. Unlike those shows, these women are speaking in Spanglish, and navigating Tejana-specific problems like green cards, cultural expectations of women, and domestic violence.

The series premiered Tuesday night after “Mexican Dynasties” and viewers’ feelings are all over the place–upset about the production, casting and what it means to be a San Antonian woman.

Mexican-Americans everywhere are feeling seen.

@aleppolly / Twitter

Or heard rather? Seriously, expect your language to be spoken and to learn a few new words in the process. Bravo TV is out here dubbing out every other Spanish word coming out of their mouths but giving us the subtitles.

Some of us are living life on the edge by just watching the show.

@vanedivinaa / Twitter

Yeah, that feeling never seems to go away? So many of us didn’t even know these were curse words growing up because our mami’s were always chismosando. That slap upside the head is the only way to learn what’s wrong and right to say.

Other Latinos were disappointed with the lack of Mexican food in the show.

@9woodMac / Twitter

So much of Latino culture is the family drama happening around a léchon only for the hangry tíos to calm down after eating. Food dictates the drama. We get it, but also, we can eat salads for lunch and still be Latino.

So, we all expected drama from the cast, but the drama is going down in Twitter threads as well.

@bossiinina / Twitter

Let’s face it, comadres, we’re all watching reality TV for the chisme and to feel better about our own lives. Some of these viewers who took to Twitter could use a mirror.

Some people are really dragging the network for their casting calls.

@TT7N9 / Twitter

Dayum. This is how to let people know how you really feel. Like, maybe some people are just being mean to be mean. The internet is perfect for that. However, some times people just don’t like seeing themselves and their communities wrongly represented.

Texas + Mexicana = Texicanas

@stephanie_wins / Twitter

Some folks are having a hard time with a Mexican cast on a show that is so obviously meant to include a cast that’s navigating two cultures. You can’t have one without the other.

Anayancy is the only woman who isn’t a U.S. citizen just yet.

@ericccdean / Twitter

Every woman has her own story. Some were born in the U.S. but grew up in Mexico. Others were born and raised in Texas. Anayancy Nolasco is still waiting for her citizenship to come through. She lives in San Antonio with her daughter, Ellie.

San Antonians are clapping back louder than the racists to prove a point.

@kesleavictoriaa / Twitter

San Antonio is a diverse city. It was once Mexican territory. All this border conflict is human-made. This is a show about people and how they navigate that conflict.

Other fans are taking a moment to straight laugh at the racists.

@RaquelVivienne / Twitter

If your problem is that the women are Mexican, then maybe you should open your eyes and stop discounting the brown people that make up the majority of your city. Just a very rational thought to leave here.

A few Latinas have complained that the women don’t represent their Latinidad.

@melanese_ / Twitter

Representation is important, claro. BUT–let our people act as wild and crazy as all the other white people in Real Housewives. We deserve cheesy rom-coms with tropes, meaningful films and trash TV like the rest of the U.S.

“Mexican Dynasties” fans feel the bar has been set too high to let “Texicanas” be.

@coletteLala / Twitter

Many folks on Twitter were calling for a full season of “Mexican Dynasties” instead of “Texicanas.” We’re going to give the show more time for the plot to develop.

Frankly, a good fraction of complainers had it in for production, not the cast.

@Paul_0808 / Twitter

It’s hard to say if the “formula” of “Mexican Dynasties” that @coletteLALA was referring to is the actual editing formula. There’s no question that “Texicanas” is trying something different.

It seems to be a mix of script and ‘reality.’

@Jacqueliinee02 @KeirnThomas / Twitter

One of the women, Penny, narrates the entire series. If you saw the teaser trailer, expect a lot more of that. The viewership is split on whether we like it or not.

This realist has a message for the pessimists out there.

@ninaluna1126 / Twitter

And that message is: drink more tequila and keep watching. Have you seen the show yet?

You can tune in to “Texicanas” debut season on Bravo, Tuesday nights.

Bravo / YouTube

It’s what we’ll be talking chisme about Wednesday mornings for the foreseeable future. If you watched the first episode, what did you think? Comment below.

READ: Fans Of ‘Mexican Dynasties’ Can’t Stop Talking About Raquel Calling A Child Ugly To His Face

Mexican Couple Hailed As Heroes For Saving 10 Dogs From Flooding Caused By Hurricane Hanna

Culture

Mexican Couple Hailed As Heroes For Saving 10 Dogs From Flooding Caused By Hurricane Hanna

Betty Vaquera Escandón / Facebook

Hurricane Hanna slammed into Texas and Mexico on July 26 as a Category 1 hurricane. Yet, the most resilient story to come from Mexico is that of a couple who rescued some sweet puppies. Their ingenuity is something that will make every Mexican proud.

This is one of the most touching moments from Hurrican Hanna.

Mis papás perdieron todo… pero lograron sacar sus bebés 😭

Posted by Betty Vaquera Escandón on Sunday, July 26, 2020

That’s right. Those sweet puppies owe it all to the loving couple who took them into their bucket and rescued them. We have seen so many heartbreaking images over the years of animals abandoned to die when places flood during hurricanes.

The videos, posted by the couple’s daughter, is being accepted with so much love and excitement.

This is a fact. These people are some of the most compassionate people by saving these puppies. Who wouldn’t want to take the time to make sure that their furbabies are okay?

She posted a follow up live video when the flooding subsided to show just how damaging it was.

Posted by Betty Vaquera Escandón on Monday, July 27, 2020

The storm dropped 18 inches of rain on southern Texas and northern Mexico. The video shows damage throughout the couple’s home and the daughter was there to document it all for them. It is clear from the level of the water that there was nothing else that could have bee done to protect these little puppies.

They did another follow up just to thank everyone.

Posted by Betty Vaquera Escandón on Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Just like any good Latino couple, they thanked everyone who has reached out to them. It is truly such a sweet and wonderful story. We will forever keep this couple in our hearts because of everything they did.

Tbh, it would be so hard not to protect these angels.

Mi antidepresivo 🐶🐶🥰💕 #Elmilaneso

Posted by Betty Vaquera Escandón on Friday, July 10, 2020

We can only hope to be as selfless and important as this couple.

READ: Hurricane Hanna Battered Texas But Did It Actually Knock Over Part Of Trump’s Border Wall?

One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Things That Matter

One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Mario Tama / Getty Images

On August 3, 2019, a man entered a Walmart in El Paso, Texas and killed 23 customers and injured 23 more. The shooter, Patrick Crusius, went to the Walmart with the expressed purpose of killing Mexican and Mexican-Americans. One year later, the community is remembering those lost.

One year ago today, a man killed 23 people in an El Paso Walmart targeting our community.

The Latino community was stunned when Patrick Crusius opened fire and killed 23 people in El Paso, Texas. The gunman wrote a manifesto and included his desire to kill as many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans he could in the El Paso Walmart. The days after were filled with grieving the loss of 23 people and trying to understand how this kind of hate could exist in our society.

Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso, is honoring the victims today.

Rep. Escobar was on the scene shortly after the shooting to be there for her community. The shooting was a reminder of the dangers of the anti-Latino and xenophobic rhetoric that the Trump administration was pushing for years.

“One year ago, our community and the nation were shocked and heartbroken by the horrific act of domestic terrorism fueled by racism and xenophobia that killed 23 beautiful souls, injured 22, and devasted all of us,” Rep. Escobar said in a statement. “Today will be painful for El Pasoans, especially for the survivors and the loved ones of those who were killed, but as we grieve and heal together apart, we must continue to face hate with love and confront xenophobia by treating the stranger with dignity and hospitality.”

El Pasoans are coming together today to remember the victims of the violence that day.

Latinos are a growing demographic that will soon eclipse the white communities in several states. Some experts in demographic shifts understand that this could be a terrifying sign for the white population. These changing demographics give life to racist and hateful ideologies.

“When you have a few people of color, the community is not seen so much as a threat,” Maria Cristina Morales, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at El Paso, told USA Today about the fear of changing demographics. “But the more that the population grows – the population of Latinos grow for instance – the more fear that there’s going to be a loss of power.”

The international attack is still felt today because of the constant examples of white supremacy still active today.

“It doesn’t occur to you that there’s a war going on, and there’s always been a war going on—the helicopters the barbed wire—but you just kind of didn’t see it,” David Dorado Romo, an El Paso historian who lost a friend in the shooting, told Time Magazine.

The sudden reminder of the hate out there towards the Latino community was felt nationwide that day. The violent attack that was planned out revealed the true cost of that hate that has been pushed by some politicians.

“El Paso families have the right to live free from fear, and I will continue to honor the victims and survivors with action,” Rep. Escobar said in her statement. “Fighting to end the gun violence and hate epidemics that plague our nation.”

READ: As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino