Entertainment

Bravo’s ‘Texicanas’ Premiered This Week And People Are Already Clapping Back Against Racists

A few months ago, Bravo teased a new addition to its collection of reality television dramas. “Texicanas” is exactly what you would expect it to be. As the name implies, it follows six Mexican-American women living in San Antonio, Texas (Tejanas). Like any other Real Housewives show, the women are rich, beautiful and trying to keep up their social lives. Unlike those shows, these women are speaking in Spanglish, and navigating Tejana-specific problems like green cards, cultural expectations of women, and domestic violence.

The series premiered Tuesday night after “Mexican Dynasties” and viewers’ feelings are all over the place–upset about the production, casting and what it means to be a San Antonian woman.

Mexican-Americans everywhere are feeling seen.

@aleppolly / Twitter

Or heard rather? Seriously, expect your language to be spoken and to learn a few new words in the process. Bravo TV is out here dubbing out every other Spanish word coming out of their mouths but giving us the subtitles.

Some of us are living life on the edge by just watching the show.

@vanedivinaa / Twitter

Yeah, that feeling never seems to go away? So many of us didn’t even know these were curse words growing up because our mami’s were always chismosando. That slap upside the head is the only way to learn what’s wrong and right to say.

Other Latinos were disappointed with the lack of Mexican food in the show.

@9woodMac / Twitter

So much of Latino culture is the family drama happening around a léchon only for the hangry tíos to calm down after eating. Food dictates the drama. We get it, but also, we can eat salads for lunch and still be Latino.

So, we all expected drama from the cast, but the drama is going down in Twitter threads as well.

@bossiinina / Twitter

Let’s face it, comadres, we’re all watching reality TV for the chisme and to feel better about our own lives. Some of these viewers who took to Twitter could use a mirror.

Some people are really dragging the network for their casting calls.

@TT7N9 / Twitter

Dayum. This is how to let people know how you really feel. Like, maybe some people are just being mean to be mean. The internet is perfect for that. However, some times people just don’t like seeing themselves and their communities wrongly represented.

Texas + Mexicana = Texicanas

@stephanie_wins / Twitter

Some folks are having a hard time with a Mexican cast on a show that is so obviously meant to include a cast that’s navigating two cultures. You can’t have one without the other.

Anayancy is the only woman who isn’t a U.S. citizen just yet.

@ericccdean / Twitter

Every woman has her own story. Some were born in the U.S. but grew up in Mexico. Others were born and raised in Texas. Anayancy Nolasco is still waiting for her citizenship to come through. She lives in San Antonio with her daughter, Ellie.

San Antonians are clapping back louder than the racists to prove a point.

@kesleavictoriaa / Twitter

San Antonio is a diverse city. It was once Mexican territory. All this border conflict is human-made. This is a show about people and how they navigate that conflict.

Other fans are taking a moment to straight laugh at the racists.

@RaquelVivienne / Twitter

If your problem is that the women are Mexican, then maybe you should open your eyes and stop discounting the brown people that make up the majority of your city. Just a very rational thought to leave here.

A few Latinas have complained that the women don’t represent their Latinidad.

@melanese_ / Twitter

Representation is important, claro. BUT–let our people act as wild and crazy as all the other white people in Real Housewives. We deserve cheesy rom-coms with tropes, meaningful films and trash TV like the rest of the U.S.

“Mexican Dynasties” fans feel the bar has been set too high to let “Texicanas” be.

@coletteLala / Twitter

Many folks on Twitter were calling for a full season of “Mexican Dynasties” instead of “Texicanas.” We’re going to give the show more time for the plot to develop.

Frankly, a good fraction of complainers had it in for production, not the cast.

@Paul_0808 / Twitter

It’s hard to say if the “formula” of “Mexican Dynasties” that @coletteLALA was referring to is the actual editing formula. There’s no question that “Texicanas” is trying something different.

It seems to be a mix of script and ‘reality.’

@Jacqueliinee02 @KeirnThomas / Twitter

One of the women, Penny, narrates the entire series. If you saw the teaser trailer, expect a lot more of that. The viewership is split on whether we like it or not.

This realist has a message for the pessimists out there.

@ninaluna1126 / Twitter

And that message is: drink more tequila and keep watching. Have you seen the show yet?

You can tune in to “Texicanas” debut season on Bravo, Tuesday nights.

Bravo / YouTube

It’s what we’ll be talking chisme about Wednesday mornings for the foreseeable future. If you watched the first episode, what did you think? Comment below.

READ: Fans Of ‘Mexican Dynasties’ Can’t Stop Talking About Raquel Calling A Child Ugly To His Face

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

Things That Matter

Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Love him or hate him, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has long called himself the voice of the people – and many Mexicans agree with him. That’s why his latest announcement against social media companies has many so worried.

In the wake of Twitter and Facebook’s (along with many other social media platforms) announcement that they would be restricting or banning Donald Trump from their platforms, the Mexican president expressed his contempt for the decisions. And his intention to create a Mexican social network that won’t be held to the standards from Silicon Valley.

Mexico’s AMLO moves to create a social media network for Mexicans outside of Silicon Valley’s control.

A week after his United States counterpart was kicked off Facebook and Twitter, President López Obrador floated the idea of creating a national social media network to avoid the possibility of Mexicans being censored.

Speaking at his daily news conference, AMLO instructed the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt) and other government departments to look at the possibility of creating a state-owned social media site that would guarantee freedom of speech in Mexico.

“We care about freedom a lot, it’s an issue that’s going to be addressed by us,” he told reporters. He also added that Facebook and Twitter have become “global institutions of censorship,” sounding a lot like the alt-right terrorists that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

“To guarantee freedom, for freedom, so there’s no censorship in Mexico. We want a country without censorship. Mexico must be a country of freedom. This is a commitment we have,” he told reporters.

AMLO deeply criticized the moves by Twitter and Facebook to ban Trump from their platforms.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty Images

AMLO – like Trump – is an avid user of social media to connect with his constituents. He’s also been known to spread falsehoods and boast about his achievements on the platforms – sound familiar?

So, it came as little surprise when he tore into social media companies for ‘censoring’ Donald Trump, saying that they have turned into “global institutions of censorship” and are carrying out a “holy inquisition.”

Nobody has the right to silence citizens even if their views are unpopular, López Obrador said. Even if the words used by Trump provoked a violent attack against his own government.

“Since they took these decisions [to suspend Trump], the Statue of Liberty has been turning green with anger because it doesn’t want to become an empty symbol,” he quipped.

So what could a Mexican social media network be called?

The president’s proposal to create a national social media network triggered chatter about what such a site would or should be called. One Twitter user suggested Facemex or Twitmex, apparently taking his inspiration from the state oil company Pemex.

The newspaper Milenio came up with three alternative names and logos for uniquely Mexican sites, suggesting that a Mexican version of Facebook could be called Facebookóatl (inspired by the Aztec feathered-serpent god Quetzalcóatl), Twitter could become Twitterlopochtli (a riff on the name of Aztec war, sun and human deity Huitzilopochtli) and Instagram could become Instagratlán (tlán, which in the Náhuatl language means place near an abundance of something – deer, for example, in the case of Mazatlán – is a common suffix in Mexican place names.)

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Carlos Villagrán Is Running To Be Governor Of Querétaro

Entertainment

Carlos Villagrán Is Running To Be Governor Of Querétaro

Paul Archuleta / FilmMagic

We all remember Carlos Villagrán as Quico from “El Chavo del Ocho.” The actor and Mexican icon is now entering the world of politics. Villagrán is entering the race for governor of Querétaro.

Actor and comedian Carlos Villagrán wants to be governor of Querétaro.

Affectionately known as Quico from “El Chavo del Ocho,” Villagrán is someone we grew up with. Now, decades after his famous role ended, Villagrán is hoping to open a brand new chapter in his life: politics.

“After 50 years of making people laugh, I find myself on another platform, which does me a tremendous honor,” Villagrán said during a press conference after filing paperwork.

Villagrán has been thinking about entering Mexican politics for a while.

It is never easy to decide if you want to become a politician. Your private life is no longer private and everything you do is suddenly under intense scrutiny. Villagrán did take time mulling over the idea before filing his paperwork to be a candidate for governor of Querétaro. He registered under the local Querétaro Independiente Party.

“I can’t say anything, because I still don’t know anyone and I have to talk to people to find out what it is about. So, I could not say anything at this moment,” Villagrán told El Universal when still debating the idea.

Villagrán created a Twitter account after announcing his candidacy and is hitting the talking points hard.

Villagrán’s official Twitter account has only pushed tweets highlighting QiBook. The social media platform is specific to Querétaro and is hoping to foster some economic and commercial success in the state.

Fans around the world are wishing him so much success.

Villagrán character Quico is one of the most celebrated characters in Latin America. The wild success of “El Chavo del Ocho” has made Villagrán a face that people throughout Latin America know and love.

However, some people are not excited to see another entertainer enter politics.

We have seen entertainers become politicians and it isn’t always a good thing. The current governor of Morales is Cuauhtémoc Blanco, a former soccer player, and people are not loving him and his leadership. We will no better about his chances of running on Feb. 8 when things are finalized.

READ: FIFA21 Releasing ‘El Chavo Del Ocho’ Uniforms To Honor The Icon For Limited Time

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