Entertainment

Bomba Esteréo Remixed Arcade Fire’s “Everything Now” Into an Awesome Latin Dance Track

Earlier this year, Bomba Esteréo embarked on a summer tour as the opening band for Canadian rockers Arcade Fire. The Colombian band, led by singer Li Saumet, have clearly made a deep impression on Arcade Fire because they’re collaborating on a new project that will surely have everyone dancing.

Bomba Esteréo has remixed Arcade Fire’s latest hit single, “Everything Now,” into a Latin dance track.

Arcade Fire / YouTube

Here’s Arcade Fire’s original song.

Huge difference, right?

Simón Mejía, of Bomba Esteréo, explained how the remix came to be.

“When Win suggested a couple of tracks from Arcade Fire’s album to remix, we chose ‘Everything Now’ as we loved the vibe of the song and what it means for these crazy times we’re living in,” Mejía said in a press release.

“We envisioned this new remix musically as being a mix between champeta vibes (the incredible riff played by our new guitar player Jose Castillo in the chorus) and electronic cumbia (the beat for the rest of the track).

These are the two genres we’ve been playing and having fun with throughout the history of Bomba Estereo. And that is what we achieved with the Arcade Fire remix—a blend between the original funky/electro/disco vibe of the track and our electro tropical style. In terms of the vocals, Win re-recorded the original vocals on top of our new musical track. Then Li has her Spanish freestyle verses in her cumbia style. All together, along with Regine, we did the chorus in Spanish which we translated to ‘Es todo ya.'”

Mejía added, “We are truly honored to have been invited to collaborate on this amazing song and love to see the power of Caribbean music right now. You can easily see its influence across much of dance music that is made today.”

One of the coolest things about the collaboration between the two bands is that you can see truly see how much Arcade Fire has embraced Latin culture while on this tour.

People are always confused how many members we have ! @thesupermaniak

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Win Butler, lead singer of Arcade Fire, has been documenting his experience in Mexico, Colombia and other countries throughout Latin America.

Wow Peru what a wonderful gift ! ??

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Night 2 in Mexico City tonight !!! ?? ???????????????? @thesupermaniak

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Maybe this means they’ll do a Spanish crossover album. One can only hope!

READ: If You’ve Ever Been Cheated On, Bomba Estéreo’s New Music Video Is Made For You

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Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

Entertainment

Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

It seems the difference between “Latinx” and “Hispanic” continues to confuse the masses where both terms are incorrectly used interchangeably to describe the collective Spanish speaking community. This time the controversy comes with the reveal of Spanish flamenco artist Rosalía on the cover of Vogue México, as the face for their list of  “20 artistas latinos.”

If you were alive over the weekend, then you likely caught the Twitter backlash that criticized Vogue for its latest faux pas.

For its latest cover, Vogue México recently featured Rosalía for an issue that headlined a group of “20 artistas latinos.

Rosalía, again, is not Latino. The artist was born in Catalonia, Spain and while she has collaborated with Latino artists like J Balvin, she is– again– not Latino. Vogue’s cultural flub is a reminder that as much of a rising influence as Latino artistry and culture continues to be, the nuances of our culture and history remain in the blindspots of many consumers. And yes, even of Vogue México’s, a media giant, that has made great strides to improve the diversity on its pages in recent years, particularly with features of minority women like Mexican indigenous actress Yalitza Aparicio. 

Latinx Twitter was quickly ablaze with comments reminding people of the correct usage: “Latinx” is for Latin America, “Hispanic” is reserved for those from Spain. 

But beyond the literal distinctions, the term “Hispanic” is loaded with ties to colonial history between Latin America and Spain. Starting in the 1500s, what was then known as “New Spain” (colonized areas including Latin America) led to the massacres of indigenous communities or forced assimilation to Spanish culture. Additionally, diseases wiped out a large portion of the population leading to mortality rates as high as 90 percent throughout Latin America.   

In short, despite the fact that Rosalía speaks Spanish, calling her Latina is culturally insensitive and grossly inaccurate.

Rosalía herself discussed the difference during an interview with Fader in May 2019 saying “If Latin music is music made in Spanish, then my music is part of Latin music. But I do know that if I say I’m a Latina artist, that’s not correct, is it?” The singer, who makes music inspired by Andalusian flamenco culture, clarified that she’s “part of a generation that’s making music in Spanish” and suggested that others should decide if she should be included in a modern definition of what “Latin” music sounds like.

In the interview, she addressed how the term is used loosely in the media though the article does mention the controversy she sparked after saying she felt “Latina” when she traveled to places like Mexico. 

Since the Vogue México cover is in Spanish it can be translated to “Latin Artists” referring to Spanish music overall.

However, due to the sensitive nature of the terminology, it’s important to take the opportunity to highlight the importance of the distinction. 

This isn’t the first instance in entertainment where the distinction needed to be made. Recently, One Day at a Time creator Gloria Calderón Kellett tweeted about how she needed to clarify that the writer she’d been sent was Hispanic not Latinx

She then tweeted a chart created by Bustle to provide a visual interpretation of the differences between “Latinx” and “Hispanic.” 

The music industry as a whole has yet to adopt this vocabulary and properly use it and the uproar is not on the spotlight placed on Rosalía but rather the fact that there are plenty of indie Latinx artists who deserve attention. 

Rosalía is a five-time Latin Grammy nominee who came out with El Mal Querer in November of last year.  She spoke with Billboard about the Andulasian influence in her neighborhood growing up that sparked her love for flamenco since the folkloric music has its origins in that community in Southern Spain. 

“That folklore is part of who I am, and that’s the key: I don’t want to lose my roots. I think that’s what gives you your identity. Rather than trying to adhere to some kind of global pop standard, it’s much more interesting to look to my roots and to the popular music of where I’m from. Not now or ever will I put flamenco aside,” she told the publication. 

Though her last album was an ode to flamenco, she has explored other more contemporary sounds and collaborated with Latinx artists include J Balvin, who is from Colombia. Their reggaeton track was a global hit providing an opportunity for a distinction to be made between the way they could’ve been identified but that wasn’t necessarily the case. 

Even well known Spanish artists like Enrique Iglesias and Alejandro Sanz are often referred to as Latino/Latinx artists. Yet, even the U.S. census has been identifying people of Spanish descent using “Hispanic” as a catchall term since 1980. In neither instance was the word used properly and the vocabulary continues to evolve now that the gender-inclusive term Latinx has become the preferred identifier for younger generations. 

While Rosalía’s music is worthy of attention and praise, it’s important to note that, like Portugal and Brazil, Spain and Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America are two distinct cultures that shouldn’t be conflated. If English artists and Americans can be identified as such and not grouped together solely based on language, it’s not much to ask that distinctions be made when it comes to “Latinx” versus “Hispanic.” 

Christina Aguilera Will Release A Spanish-Language Album And OMG I’ve Been Waiting For This Since ‘Mi Reflejo’

Entertainment

Christina Aguilera Will Release A Spanish-Language Album And OMG I’ve Been Waiting For This Since ‘Mi Reflejo’

@MrNickLocke / Twitter

This month marks 20 years since Christina Aguilera released “Genie in a Bottle,” and the artist is celebrating a new milestone this weekend: “The Xperience” opening show of her Las Vegas residency. It was at her Vegas residency that Aguilera dropped some highly anticipated news that is making fans flip out with excitement.

“Let us not forget,” Christina Aguilera told her fans. “The Latin album is coming.”

@idolator / Twitter

It seems that Xtina is raising a family, enjoying her residency in Vegas and working on a new album… in Spanish.

“I want to do it the right way,” she tells Billboard.

@billboard / Twitter

“I’ve been wanting to do it for years,” she told Billboard. “But I want to do it the right way. I want to work with musicians and beautiful people from the Latin world who just eat, sleep and breathe it, and live it, and learn from them. I want to really experience it from the ground up.”

Fans are already trying to help Xtina out with some references.

@NBCTeamShakira / Twitter

Twitter user @NBCTeamShakira called out Aguilera with a little suggestion, “Hey @xtina… Call @shakira to help you with your Spanish Album. She is a producer, songwriter, and singer. She has 12 Latin GRAMMYs and 3 GRAMMYs. It’s the biggest female name in Latin America, and the fans dream of their collaboration. Powerful women. #XtinaAndShakira”

And a hashtag was born. #XtinaAndShakira

Demi Lovato might have been her No. 1 stan at the show.

@ehadshealth / Twitter

Lovato filmed nearly the entire performance on her Instagram live, including selfie videos of actual tears running down her face. Fans are now wondering if Lovato will be featured in her new album.

In case you forgot, Aguilera released “Mi Reflejo” in 2000 and Latinos had a moment of representation in mainstream pop music wept.

@cammcma / Twitter

Aguilera’s “Mi Reflejo” won the Bet Female Pop Vocal Album Latin Grammy and has been promising a follow-up album for a minute now. Why the hold-up?

Aguilera revealed that she’s starting to take Spanish lessons.

@RARESTXTINA / Twitter

“I always heard my parents speak it in the house, but I never fully learned [Spanish],” she tells Billboard. “I’m even digging in and trying to start the lessons.”

“It’ll take a little time balancing the show and the recording hours, but it’s coming.

@morganhoneyb / Twitter

Fans have heard this before and are jaded by false promises. Others, however, have high expectations.

This fan who experienced #TheXperience first hand predicts a new Latin Queen.

@levolti / Twitter

Unquestionably, J.Lo has sat at the throne for decades now. This is the “Game of Thrones” chisme we deserve.

Other fans are already opening space in their hearts for a Latin tour.

@JeanCDeLuca / Twitter

Latin America has been waiting for a tour for far too long, and @JeanCDeLuca predicts Aguilera will grace the diaspora in 2020.

We’ve moved past asking when the album will drop to begging for the tour.

@SERGIOTHEHUMAN / Twitter

We’re blasting @SergioTheHuman’s request from the rooftops in the hopes that Aguilera will hear her fans. Her Spanish language album success has only marinated into stronger cravings for more content.

Obviously fans wan a headlining performance at the Latin GRAMMYs.

@paige_t / Twitter

The biggest question folks have right now is: who will be on the album? So far, Christina has only alluded to the album being in the making.

Those ride or die fans are already making threats in exchange for live music.

@GottaLoveXtina / Twitter

Cuidado, Xtina! Your Latino stans need you more than you know.

Needless to say, fans are shooketh by the whole Xperience.

@EmanuelGtrz / Twitter

As the summer goes on, who knows what else we’ll learn from Christina’s own mouth. We hope she’ll practice her Spanish with the audience.

READ: Christina Aguilera Opened The Floodgates For Curious Twitter Fans And Her Answers Were Honest And Real