Entertainment

If You’re Into Rock Music, These Latino Bands Are Essential Additions To Your Playlist

Rock music has captured a special place in the Latino community. Just think of bands like Morrissey and you’ll get the picture. The influence of rock music is felt strongly in the Latino community, especially when you consider how many Latinos are in the rock music industry. Here are 20 Latin based artists and bands to rock out to. Who know. They might be on your next playlist.

1. Tom Araya

CREDIT: Tom Araya. Digital Image. IMDB. September 10, 2018.

The lead vocalist for Slayer, Tomás “Tom” Enrique Araya Díaz was born in Viña del Mar, Chile and came to the US when he was 5 years old. Raised in Maywood in Los Angeles County, the band was formed in Huntington Park.

2. The Mars Volta

CREDIT: The Mars Volta. Digital Image. Pop Matters. September 10, 2018.

The band might no longer be together, but The Mars Volta’s one band you should learn about. Four out of the five members have Mexican roots and you can feel it in their music. The band was formed in El Paso, Texas.

3. Zack De La Rocha

CREDIT: Zack De La Rocha / Facebook

Zacharias Manuel de la Rocha is deeply connected to the Chicano community. The lead singer for Rage Against the Machine is someone that should be in your playlist if he isn’t already.

4. Teri Gender Bender

CREDIT: Teri Gender Bender. Digital Image. Alarm Magazine. September 10, 2018.

Teresa Suárez Cosío is a Colorado native who performs with the Le Butcherettes, a Guadalajara-based group. She is also part of Bosnian Rainbows with The Mars Volta’s Omar Rodríguez-López.

5. Union 13

CREDIT: Union 13. Digital Image. AllMusic. September 10, 2018.

If you’re looking for an underground, local vibe, Union 13 is the band for you. The Boyle Heights-based band is ver engaged on social media and love interacting with their fans.

6. Viernes 13

CREDIT: Viernes 13 / Facebook

Viernes 13 was founded in Los Angeles by Mario Luna and Jose Luis in the 1990s. The original members might not be around anymore, but like Menudo, they keep the heart and soul alive with new members.

7. Las Cochinas

CREDIT: Las Cochinas / Facebook

An all female punk band, Las Cochinas has a hip-hop and poetic feel in their music. If you haven’t heard about them, well, now you know.

8. Cannibal And The Headhunters

CREDIT: Cannibal and the Headhunters / Facebook

Originating from East LA, Cannibal and the Headhunters was the opening act on The Beatles’ second American tour. Talk about a career goal.

9. Aurelio Voltaire

CREDIT: Aurelio Voltaire. Digital Image. Hartford Courant. September 10, 2018.

Cuban born Aurelio Voltaire Hernández is a dark cabaret musician. You might not recognize him immediately, but this man created some of the music we love from “The Grimm Adventures of Billy and Mandy.”

10. Thee Midniters

CREDIT: Thee Midniters / YouTube

An East LA band, Thee Midniters were one of the first rock bands to use Chicanismo in their music. That’s how you elevate a movement.

11. Ritchie Valens

CREDIT: Ritchie Valens. Digital Image. Biography. September 10, 2018.

Richard Steven Valenzuela was a Pacoima, California born musician who paved the way for Chicano rock. He died tragically in a plane crash on Feb. 3, 1959 along with Buddy Holly, J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson and the pilot.

12. Los Lobos

CREDIT: loslobos / Instagram

Los Lobos originated in East LA and were nominated to be inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2015. The band will instantly connect you to your Mexican identity.

13. José Feliciano

CREDIT: José Feliciano. Digital Image. The Village Green. September 10, 2018.

José Feliciano was born in Puerto Rico blind at birth. Exposed to music at a young age, he played the guitar in his youth and became a household name.

14. Santana

CREDIT: Santana. Digital Image. Something Else!. September 10, 2018.

Founded in San Francisco by Carlos Santana, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees have both Grammys and Latin Grammys.

15. Los Lonely Boys

CREDIT: los_lonely_boys / Instagram

The Chicano Rock group from San Angelo, Texas, keeps it all in the family. The brothers have made a name for themselves in the music industry. They even have a song in the Santana album “All That I Am.”

16. Filoxera

CREDIT: Filoxera / Facebook

A Guatemala-based band, Filoxera also produces music in English. Their latest single “Fuel” released in June 2018 and is definitely worth a listen.

17. Pierce the Veil

CREDIT: piercetheveil / Instagram

Brothers Mike Fuentes and Vic Fuentes formed Pierce the Veil in San Diego’s intense punk scene. They tend to stick to the heavier stylings of rock with metalcore and emo music as their genres of choice.

18. The Zeros

CREDIT: The Zeros. Digital Image. San Diego Reader. September 10, 2018.

The Zeros is a punk rock band founded in the Chula Vista, California. They have performed multiple covers including Sator’s “Black and White.” If you have some time, might as well give them a quick listen and see what they’re all about.

19. Xenia Rubinos

CREDIT: xeniarubinos / Instagram

Xenia Rubinos’ music uses an overlapping of different musical genres. Particularly, if you’re into funky indie-rock, Rubinos is the musician for you.

20. Chicano Batman

CREDIT: chicanobatman / Instagram

Chicano Batman has been on the rise since 2008. All but one member is from Los Angeles; drummer Gabriel Villa is from Cali, Colombia. The group has performed at some of the biggest music festivals giving Latinos representation on stages like never before.


READ: Here’s 19 Ways Latinxs Slayed And Played At The Billboard Music Awards

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Brazil’s New Culture Official Says There Is A Link Between Abortion And Rock Music

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Brazil’s New Culture Official Says There Is A Link Between Abortion And Rock Music

IMDB

One of President Jair Bolsonaro’s top officials, the head of Brazil’s National Arts Foundation Dante Mantovani says rock music leads to satanism and abortions. The right-wing conspiracy posits that the social theorist Theodore Adorno, who was influenced by Karl Marx, wrote the entire Beatles’ song catalog to destroy Western civilization. It is completely unfounded and totally fabricated.

Mantovani shared a video on his personal YouTube page explaining how rock music leads to abortions which leads to Satanism. The 11-minute video accuses Elvis Presley and John Lennon of being affiliated with the devil. 

Mantovani says rock music destroyed American values in the 1960s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wozkvbecbSI

“Rock music leads to drugs, which leads to sex, which leads to abortions,” Mantovani said. “At the same time, the abortion industry feeds into something much more serious which is Satanism.” 

On December 2nd, Bolsanaro appointed Mantovani to oversee Funarte, an organization founded in 1975. Once under the Ministry of Culture, after Bolsonaro’s administration eliminated that agency, it is now under the subdivision of the Ministry of Citizenship according to CNN. The purpose of Funarte is to, “promote and incentivize the production, practice, development and diffusion of the arts throughout the country.”

Mantovani lambasted artists like John Lennon and Elvis Presley for introducing behaviors like “hip-shaking” that leads to satanism.  “Lennon openly said, more than once, that he made a pact with the devil — with Satan, in order to be famous and successful,” he says. “In the 1950’s this so-called Elvis Presley emerges with rock music that makes everyone bounce and shake their hips. This is when certain behaviors start being introduced — Elvis Presley, for instance, died of an overdose.”

This isn’t the first time Mantovani has disparaged rock music.

Mantovani seems to believe that there is too much rhythm in rock music which causes people to beat each other. 

“What happens with rock is that the rhythm is always very repetitive. When a musical genre is more based on rhythm it speaks more to the body than the soul,” Mantovani says in a video from 2018 named “Is Rock Music?” “That’s why you see in rock shows people jumping, sometimes hitting each other — in punk rock there is the tradition of people beating each other and then leaving as old friends.” 

The issue with Mantovani’s bizarre views is that they could influence polices. He will oversee initiatives for music events and he is responsible for allocating government funds to music and the arts. In the past, artists have been able to receive up to 60 million Brazilian reals ($14 million) in funding from the government, although Bolsonaro has recently slashed that number. 

The government official also blames the American CIA for spreading the psychedelic drug LSD at Woodstock 1969. 

“Woodstock, that festival from the 1960s that gather a bunch of people, where hippies took drugs and LSD — there are certain theories that suggest that the large scale distribution of the drug was actually carried out by the CIA,” he says in the video. 

Of course, Mantovani is willing to make exceptions for his personal favorites: Metallica and Angra. 

Mantovani claims Metallica and Angra are the exceptions to the rule because they’re good to listen to “when you’re driving in traffic” or “feeling a bit tired.” Angra bassist Felipe Andreoli responded on Instagram, saying he was embarrassed to even be affiliated with the head of Funarte. 

“So much ignorance, so much disinformation, SO EMBARRASSED to have my band associated in any way with this guy. I’m not going to waste my time attacking his comments because, those of us who live off of and know about rock music know that he is delirious,” CNN translated. “It scares me to see such a retrograde, fanatical person in such an important position for our country’s culture.”

Newsweek believes the conspiracy theory, that Adorno wrote the Beatles’ music with Marxist undertones, began to spread amongst the right in Brazil this September, a month before Mantovani made his video. Olavo de Carvalho a mentor of Bolsonaro and a right-wing extremist who once said Pepsi used stem cells from aborted fetuses as sweetener, spread the Beatles conspiracy. However, the conspiracy itself is fairly old.

“The theory seems to have originated with The Committee of 300, a book by supposed ex-MI6 agent John Coleman,” according to Rock Nerd. “This reveals how Adorno, in fact, masterminded the whole British Invasion of the 1960s, although apparently for that the Tavistock Institute (which Adorno had nothing to do with outside the works of conspiracists) was the work of Jesuits rather than Jews. Or perhaps, if you ask Henry Makow, the Illuminati.” 

Newsweek suggests it is unsurprising Mantovani would espouse such strange rhetoric when many in Bolsonaro’s administration seem to be obsessed with rigid, so-called traditional values. 

A Photo Of This Sad, Sweet Old Lady Went Viral Because She Hadn’t Sold Any Of Her Handmade Napkins, Now They’re All Sold

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A Photo Of This Sad, Sweet Old Lady Went Viral Because She Hadn’t Sold Any Of Her Handmade Napkins, Now They’re All Sold

Leo Brown / Facebook

The internet is a dark place —dark and full of terrors. But on a few rare occasions, it serves for good purposes. Last week, the pictures of a sweet indigenous woman, captured crying after she wasn’t able to sell her handmade napkins went viral. And in a deliciously gratifying turn of events, the next day her sales soared —and what’s more, people even asked to take pictures with her.

This sweet old lady was looking a little blue, so a stranger decided to ask what was wrong.

Doña Adela Vidales, a Purépecha woman from the town of Turícuaro, Michoacán, was sitting on the floor in downtown Uruapan looking sad, when Leopoldo Álvarez noticed her dispirited demeanor. Being a Purépecha himself, the man felt moved so he took a few sneaky pictures of her without being noticed, and approached the woman to ask what was wrong. “She looked sad. I took two photos of her back and I asked her why she was sad, and she told me that she hadn’t sold anything,” Álvarez told Mexican newspaper Milenio.

Leopoldo Álvarez took to Facebook to share the woman’s story.

Álvarez, who runs a catering business in Michoacán, posted the photos on Facebook, with the caption:  “Doña Adela was sad because she hadn’t sold her artisanal napkins, and I told her that I was going to promote her products on social media… I invite you all to buy from her, she works in downtown Uruapan…,” he wrote in Spanish.

The next day, Doña Adela’s napkins sold out.

Just a week after the photos went up on Facebook, Leopoldo’s post had garnered over 2,500 likes and 619 comments —the post had been shared more than 8,000 times! “I didn’t think it would have such reach,” he said.

After many followers asked him how they could reach Doña Adela, he went to Turícuaro to find her.

“I went back to see her and we spoke. She told me that the next day, on Sunday, she went to work and sold everything and even finished early… and it was curious,” he added, “because she doesn’t usually sell out so early. But she sold everything and there were even people who wanted to take pictures with her,” Álvarez said.

“I felt useful,” said Álvares, “I don’t care about becoming famous.”

Leopoldo explained that he feels happy about having helped Doña Adela, and when he saw her again, days later, she expressed how immensely grateful she was.  “I felt useful, and I think I did my part. People congratulate me, but I think anyone would do the same.”

Álvarez reiterated that when he posted the photos of her, that he only cared about helping Doña Adela sell the napkins she had  made by hand.

Despite the huge engagement his post had; now he sees that ‘likes’ and ‘shares’ aren’t enough —he wants this to become something that provides real support to Michoacán artisans. “A ‘like’ doesn’t symbolize a purchase, a ‘share’ doesn’t symbolize an order. People haven’t kept buying, and the intention is to help.” said Leopoldo. “I don’t care about becoming famous, I wanted to help her.”

Leopoldo shared Doña Adela’s grandson, Melitón’s phone number in his social media profiles, so that people who are interested in buying can reach them. The caterer says he wants to help artisans from his own hometown, Pamatácuaro, who make wooden spoons, molinillos, and woven baskets. “I’d like to benefit my community, the artisans, that was my intention with Doña Adela, because there are many more artisans like her who live off their sales.”

Don’t take away valuable business from indigenous artisans by buying imitations from big corporations.

Many stores like Urban Outfitters or Anthropologie, are taking valuable business away from actual indigenous artists and small businesses by making cheap knockoffs of their hand-made work. Support indigenous creativity, history, and legacy, and help create a much-needed economic boost in rural areas by shopping from small, authentic indigenous businesses, everywhere.