Entertainment

If You’re Into Rock Music, These Latino Bands Are Essential Additions To Your Playlist

Rock music has captured a special place in the Latino community. Just think of bands like Morrissey and you’ll get the picture. The influence of rock music is felt strongly in the Latino community, especially when you consider how many Latinos are in the rock music industry. Here are 20 Latin based artists and bands to rock out to. Who know. They might be on your next playlist.

1. Tom Araya

CREDIT: Tom Araya. Digital Image. IMDB. September 10, 2018.

The lead vocalist for Slayer, Tomás “Tom” Enrique Araya Díaz was born in Viña del Mar, Chile and came to the US when he was 5 years old. Raised in Maywood in Los Angeles County, the band was formed in Huntington Park.

2. The Mars Volta

CREDIT: The Mars Volta. Digital Image. Pop Matters. September 10, 2018.

The band might no longer be together, but The Mars Volta’s one band you should learn about. Four out of the five members have Mexican roots and you can feel it in their music. The band was formed in El Paso, Texas.

3. Zack De La Rocha

CREDIT: Zack De La Rocha / Facebook

Zacharias Manuel de la Rocha is deeply connected to the Chicano community. The lead singer for Rage Against the Machine is someone that should be in your playlist if he isn’t already.

4. Teri Gender Bender

CREDIT: Teri Gender Bender. Digital Image. Alarm Magazine. September 10, 2018.

Teresa Suárez Cosío is a Colorado native who performs with the Le Butcherettes, a Guadalajara-based group. She is also part of Bosnian Rainbows with The Mars Volta’s Omar Rodríguez-López.

5. Union 13

CREDIT: Union 13. Digital Image. AllMusic. September 10, 2018.

If you’re looking for an underground, local vibe, Union 13 is the band for you. The Boyle Heights-based band is ver engaged on social media and love interacting with their fans.

6. Viernes 13

CREDIT: Viernes 13 / Facebook

Viernes 13 was founded in Los Angeles by Mario Luna and Jose Luis in the 1990s. The original members might not be around anymore, but like Menudo, they keep the heart and soul alive with new members.

7. Las Cochinas

CREDIT: Las Cochinas / Facebook

An all female punk band, Las Cochinas has a hip-hop and poetic feel in their music. If you haven’t heard about them, well, now you know.

8. Cannibal And The Headhunters

CREDIT: Cannibal and the Headhunters / Facebook

Originating from East LA, Cannibal and the Headhunters was the opening act on The Beatles’ second American tour. Talk about a career goal.

9. Aurelio Voltaire

CREDIT: Aurelio Voltaire. Digital Image. Hartford Courant. September 10, 2018.

Cuban born Aurelio Voltaire Hernández is a dark cabaret musician. You might not recognize him immediately, but this man created some of the music we love from “The Grimm Adventures of Billy and Mandy.”

10. Thee Midniters

CREDIT: Thee Midniters / YouTube

An East LA band, Thee Midniters were one of the first rock bands to use Chicanismo in their music. That’s how you elevate a movement.

11. Ritchie Valens

CREDIT: Ritchie Valens. Digital Image. Biography. September 10, 2018.

Richard Steven Valenzuela was a Pacoima, California born musician who paved the way for Chicano rock. He died tragically in a plane crash on Feb. 3, 1959 along with Buddy Holly, J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson and the pilot.

12. Los Lobos

CREDIT: loslobos / Instagram

Los Lobos originated in East LA and were nominated to be inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2015. The band will instantly connect you to your Mexican identity.

13. José Feliciano

CREDIT: José Feliciano. Digital Image. The Village Green. September 10, 2018.

José Feliciano was born in Puerto Rico blind at birth. Exposed to music at a young age, he played the guitar in his youth and became a household name.

14. Santana

CREDIT: Santana. Digital Image. Something Else!. September 10, 2018.

Founded in San Francisco by Carlos Santana, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees have both Grammys and Latin Grammys.

15. Los Lonely Boys

CREDIT: los_lonely_boys / Instagram

The Chicano Rock group from San Angelo, Texas, keeps it all in the family. The brothers have made a name for themselves in the music industry. They even have a song in the Santana album “All That I Am.”

16. Filoxera

CREDIT: Filoxera / Facebook

A Guatemala-based band, Filoxera also produces music in English. Their latest single “Fuel” released in June 2018 and is definitely worth a listen.

17. Pierce the Veil

CREDIT: piercetheveil / Instagram

Brothers Mike Fuentes and Vic Fuentes formed Pierce the Veil in San Diego’s intense punk scene. They tend to stick to the heavier stylings of rock with metalcore and emo music as their genres of choice.

18. The Zeros

CREDIT: The Zeros. Digital Image. San Diego Reader. September 10, 2018.

The Zeros is a punk rock band founded in the Chula Vista, California. They have performed multiple covers including Sator’s “Black and White.” If you have some time, might as well give them a quick listen and see what they’re all about.

19. Xenia Rubinos

CREDIT: xeniarubinos / Instagram

Xenia Rubinos’ music uses an overlapping of different musical genres. Particularly, if you’re into funky indie-rock, Rubinos is the musician for you.

20. Chicano Batman

CREDIT: chicanobatman / Instagram

Chicano Batman has been on the rise since 2008. All but one member is from Los Angeles; drummer Gabriel Villa is from Cali, Colombia. The group has performed at some of the biggest music festivals giving Latinos representation on stages like never before.


READ: Here’s 19 Ways Latinxs Slayed And Played At The Billboard Music Awards

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The Romance Between Frida Kahlo And Chavela Vargas Gets Renewed Attention As Long Lost Love Letters Are Uncovered

Entertainment

The Romance Between Frida Kahlo And Chavela Vargas Gets Renewed Attention As Long Lost Love Letters Are Uncovered

Jorge Silva / Getty Images

Frida Kahlo’s paintings perfectly show the artist’s whirlwind of emotions throughout her life. Her art gives a look into her passions, her pains and her loves, which went far beyond Diego Rivera. 

It’s long been known that the prolific artist had many loves throughout her life, both men and women, and including many major personalities of their time. Everyone from Tina Modotti and the politician León Trotsky were on that list in addition to her longtime companion, Diego Rivera. However, one of Kahlo’s great loves and of whom little is said was the singer Chavela Vargas.

Chavela, who was 12 years younger than Frida, spoke on several occasions about the love she had for Kahlo when her musical career began to take off, while she was “a child.” And thanks to recently discovered love letters we have a new perspective on this little known relationship.

New love letters give us details into the romance between Frida Kahlo and Chavela Vargas.

Although Chavela had claimed to have destroyed all of the love letters she received from Frida Kahlo, new love letters have recently been discovered that paint a new light on the romance.

There is one letter Kahlo had written to Carlos Pellicer, a Mexican poet, to express her feelings about the singer. She told him that after meeting Chavela she felt attracted to her from the very first moment – in some pretty steamy language.

“Today I met Chavela Vargas. Extraordinary, lesbian, what’s more, I wanted her erotically. I don’t know if she felt what I did. But I think she’s a liberal enough woman, that if she asks me, I wouldn’t hesitate for a second to undress in front of her. How many times do you not want to get laid and that’s it? She, I repeat, is erotic. Is it a gift that heaven sends me?”, wrote Kahlo.

It was shortly after Kahlo wrote that letter that Chavela went to live with her and Diego at La Casa Azul. In another recently discovered letter, Vargas writes – of her time at Casa Azul – that she felt very happy and in love, as well as loved by Kahlo.

“She taught me a lot of things and I learned a so much. Without giving away too much, I held the sky with my hands, with every word, every morning,” she said.

The lovers had an intense relationship that has fascinated fans to this day.

The two had met at one of the many parties Kahlo and Rivera would host at their home in Casa Azul. The couple were prolific entertainers and often threw extravagant parties.

Before her death, Vargas detailed that night’s meeting.

“A painter friend invited me. She said: ‘There’s a party at Frida’s house tonight. Shall we go?’ I went and the atmosphere was full of people. The night passed, we sang, everyone danced, everyone entertained,” Vargas says in the documentary Chavela, released in 2017.

“I was in a daze when I saw her face, her eyes. I thought she couldn’t be a being from this world. Her eyebrows together were a swallow in flight. Without yet having the maturity of a woman in me, since I was a very young girl, I sensed that I could love that being with the most devoted love in the world, the strongest love in the world,” said the singer about Frida.

Although the romance didn’t last long thanks in part to the painter’s relationship with Diego Rivera.

Credit: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Vargas confessed that the romance didn’t last for a long time on the account of having to share the painter’s love with Diego Rivera. According to Vargas, one day Kahlo simply decided to abandon her.

“My words possibly hurt her a lot when I told her I was leaving and she told me: ‘I know. It is impossible to tie you to anybody’s life. I can’t tie you to my crutches or to my bed. Go away!’ And one day I opened the door and didn’t come back,” Vargas said.

Although the singer never spoke about whether she had intimate relationships with the painter, the romance, as well as the great love and attraction they felt for each other is something that cannot be denied.

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Cuban Government Backtracks On Historic Deal With Protesters Just Days After Reaching An Agreement

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Cuban Government Backtracks On Historic Deal With Protesters Just Days After Reaching An Agreement

Alexandre Meneghini / Getty Images

It seemed that many Cuban’s hopes for greater freedom of expression – particularly in the art world – seems to have been dashed again. In less than 24 hours after apparently agreeing to meet several demands from dissident artists, the government broke at least three of the five agreements in had made.

Freedom of expression is a hot topic in Cuba, where the communist regime severely limits what artists can say and produce.

But even more rare: public protest. That’s what makes these recent marches in Havana so important, the island hasn’t seen anything like it in decades. And as almost on script, the Cuban government flipped on its public reaction to the growing movement, instead blaming it on “U.S. imperialism” and foreign intervention.

Cuban officials have completely condemned the protest movement in a full 180º change of attitude.

Over the weekend, Cuba saw unprecedented protests led by dissident artists and creatives – known as the San Isidro movement – seeking greater freedom of expression. And although it seemed early on that the group may have made progress (the government agreed to several concessions), those hopes went up in flames as the government launched an all-out rhetorical assault.

Shortly after the meeting between protesters and officials, the protest came to a peaceful end with leaders thinking they achieved what they had set out to do, and with a meeting to discuss the issues further.

But just hours later the government called in the top U.S. diplomat on the island, charge de affairs Timothy Zúñiga-Brown, for a scolding over “grave interference in Cuba’s internal affairs” as state television ran a 90-minute special attacking members of the protest group and broadcasting visuals of their interactions with U.S. diplomats and Miami exiles.

“Sovereign Cuba accepts no interference … The revolutionary ones will fight back,” President Miguel Diaz-Canel said in one of a series of Twitter posts accusing the San Isidro movement of being a “reality show” on social media created by “U.S. imperialists.”

What originally seemed like progress now seems like business as usual for the communist regime.

Credit: Yamil Lapage / AFP / Getty Images

It seemed, at least for a few short hours, that there was a real chance at bolstering artistic freedom in Cuba. The group of protesters, known as the San Isidro movement, gathered outside the culture ministry, leading Fernando Rojas, the deputy culture minister, to invite in a group of 30 of them. The meeting lasted for more than four hours, those present have said, and resulted in a promise of greater freedoms for artists.

Writer Katherine Bisquet told the press afterward that there had been a “truce for independent spaces” where activists could meet and talk, and that further discussions were promised.

“I cannot emphasize enough that this kind of public protest, with hundreds of people standing outside a ministry for 14 hours, is unprecedented,” Cuban-American artist Coco Fusco told Artnet News. “The fact that government officials conceded to a meeting is in itself a victory for the artists and a sign of weakness on the part of the government.”

The government had also agreed to urgently review the case of a detained member of the San Isidro crew and a rapper sentenced this month to eight months in jail on charges of contempt. It also agreed to ensure independent artists in the future were not harassed.

Cuban officials blamed the U.S. for stirring up dissent.

Shortly after the government launched a verbal assault on the group, it also accused the U.S. of helping them. Officials at the Foreign Ministry summoned the top U.S. diplomat in Cuba, Chargé d’Affaires Timothy Zuñiga-Brown, and complained about U.S. “intervention.”

At Sunday’s rally, Díaz Canel said that “Trumpistas” (referring to the Trump administration) and the “anti-Cuban mafia that are now ‘Trumpistas'” (referring to Cuban American Trump supporters in Miami) “had on their agenda that before the year ends, the revolutions of Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela have to fall.”

Jake Sullivan, Joe Biden’s national security adviser, tweeted Sunday: “We support the Cuban people in their struggle for liberty and echo calls for the Cuban government to release peaceful protestors. The Cuban people must be allowed to exercise the universal right to freedom of expression.”

Thanks to an imploding economy in the wake of the Covid-19 crisis, Cuba is experiencing an unprecedented crisis.

Credit: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

Cuba is going through dire shortages in food and basic goods amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has practically halted tourism to the island, on top of the Trump administration’s harsh sanctions.

Against that backdrop, García said, “I think the government should think about these things and view dialogue as a valid option to avoid a major disaster.”

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