Entertainment

Here Are The Most Fabulous And Bizarre Costumes From FX’s “Pose”

Pose / FX

FX’s hit drama series “Pose” is making history in too many ways to count. The production team has assembled the largest transgender cast ever for a scripted series. There is one, white cisgender male supporting star and it shows. The show also boasts the first ever trans woman of color scriptwriter writer. Beyond all these firsts, we get an inside look at what the LGBT staple culture of the late ’80s looked like for Black and Latino queer people, and it’s fabulous.

Balls were the one place LGBTQ people could congregate and truly be themselves, or whoever they wanted to be. Contestants often belonged to ‘houses’ with head ‘mothers’ and competed for prizes. Often the ‘category’ of a walk would be “weather girl” or “working man”, with the goal to “pass” as cisgender and be accepted in society. More often, the categories were just purely bizarre and fun.

The Category is Royal Family

Credit: Pose / FX

The opening scene of the entire series shows us the esteemed House of Abundance as they prepare to rob a museum of its Victorian-era regalia worn by actual royalty. Rumors in the ballroom community are that this actually happened, and everyone got away with it because the museum was too homophobic to press charges and get ‘negative’ press.

The Category is Best Mother

Credit: Pose / FX

Meet Elektra Abundance, played by Dominique Jackson, and Mother of the House of Abundance. She wins this title year after year with no competition, literally. In the community, she’s revered for being able to completely pass as cisgender.

Meet the competition, Ms. Blanca Evangelista

Credit: Pose / FX

Boricua Blanca leaves Elektra’s house to start her own after she discovers she’s HIV positive. Her ‘children’ begged her not to compete against Elektra. Her response? “I’ve felt the wind at my face all my life; I know when it’s at my back.” Never question your mother.

Pray Tell is our eloquent emcee.

Credit: Pose / FX

Let the record show that this show is set in 1987-88, and his character designs all his own clothes. But because of homophobia, he wouldn’t have made it as a fashion designer. Instead, he’s revered in the community and leader of all balls.

The Category Is Best Dressed, High Class, In A Fur Coat

 Credit: Pose / FX

He’s serving us Billy Dean, “mascul-tint-ity” and “butch queen realness.” This look earned him a spot at the House of Evangelista, baby.

The Category is Snow Ball

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Angel walks out at every ball looking like she fell from heaven. She’s a Snow Belle.

The Category is Butch Queen

Credit: Pose / FX

He didn’t even bother putting on a costume, and he won. The satire of this entire show is that the costumes people are putting on are the ones that the hetero world made. Everyone is in costume, trying to pass.

The Category is Weather Girl

Credit: Pose / FX

When Puerto Rican beauty, Angel Evangelista, played by Indya Moore, stepped out into this category, the emcee changed the name of the game. “This category is realness. Bring it like a weather girl. Who will show up? Whether it be rain or shine, who is real enough to be on channel 9? Oh, Ms. Angel, this category used to be for the juicy girls, but not tonight.”

9. The Category is Labels

Credit: Pose / FX

No knock-offs allowed in here, just pure realness. This is all our favorite look of Elektra’s. She just received her gender affirming surgery and is looking fresh and happy as hell.

The Category is Intergalactic Best-Dressed

Credit: Pose / FX

“Quarter grapefruit, quarter gingerbread man and totally out of his miiind.” He’s from the depths of the sea. Is he here for business or pleasure? We don’t want to find out, darlings.

Meet The “All-Seeing, All-Knowing Twizzler Licorice Realness”

Credit: Pose / FX

“I don’t know what she’s invoking, but I’m totally spellbound,” says Pray Tell.

She’s a “Dipsy Doodle Big B**ch Tag”

Credit: Pose / FX

Okay, I don’t know what this means but even Pray Tell admits, “That’s a bold move, and we love you for it, b**ch.”

Madeline Meets Mime

Credit: Pose / FX

Moving past how terrifying it would be to meet an alien that was this creepy, can we acknowledge the beauty in the details? We’re waiting to meet the costume designer when she gets her Nobel Peace Prize.

The Category is Face

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You can’t buy this category. You’re born into it. Angel wins this category every single time, because, well, that face is flawless. You’ve been blessed, Indya Moore.

The Category is ‘You About to Get Reamed By Elektra’

Credit: Pose / FX

After Elektra gets her vaginoplasty, her sugar daddy becomes disgusted with her and abandons her. Her value as a sex object plummets and she’s forced to find another way to make a living. As viewers, it was tragic to see Elektra return to stripping, and glorious when we saw Blanca take her in.

Elektra returns to the balls and gives all the ‘children’ who abandoned her a run for their money.

The Category is Mother-Daughter Realness

Credit: Pose / FX

Each mother had to introduce her daughter at a Debutante Ball, and they better be wearing spring colors. Ms. Angel is pure Peppermint Patty Perfection.

Elektra almost always relies on her physical beauty and style to win.

Credit: Pose / FX

At different points, the judges will take a magnifying glass to look at contestants skin. How soft are they? How ‘real’ are they?

Others earn points for vogueing.

Credit: Pose / FX

Check it: only the lining touches the ground. That’s a move.

The Category is Working Girl

Credit: Pose / FX

The beauty of this category is that FX’s Pose truly is giving the LGBTQ community working jobs to be exactly who they are, representing their community accurately. We’re here for that.

We rate Pose 10 out of 10.

Credit: Pose / FX

The execution, the message, the costumes, the representation, todo de todo. Check it out on FX, Google Play or the Apple Store the first chance you get. It’s all the LGBT Latinx realness we need.

READ: FX’s ‘Pose’ Is Giving Trans People Of Color The Representation They Have Never Seen Before

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13 Reasons Why Latinos Will Miss Seeing Their Stories In ‘Jane The Virgin’

Entertainment

13 Reasons Why Latinos Will Miss Seeing Their Stories In ‘Jane The Virgin’

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WARNING, SOME VERY CHIQUITO SPOILERS AHEAD! 

The end of one of our favorite shows, Jane the Virgin, is near. For almost five years (it was first aired in 2014) we have followed the adventures of Jane Gloriana Villanueva, our heroine who was wrongly inseminated. Jane’s journey was also related to her career as a writer, a vocation that she tries to follow even though life sometimes gets in the way. The narrative accomplishes something almost impossible to pull off: it makes outrageous telenovela situations feel close to us. The 100th and last ever episode will be aired on July 31st, and fans are getting their tissue box ready for what promises to be a tearful finale. Because we don’t like goodbyes we will start our farewell now. These are some of the reasons why we consider Jane the Virgin to be a watershed moment in the history of Latino representation in mainstream television, and why we will miss Jane, her lovers, her family, and her amazingly quirky son. A llorar se ha dicho

1. Jane the Virgin was finally a show that represented the many complexities of Latino communities in the U.S.: it made us laugh and cry in equal measures.

Credit: cwjanethevirgin / Instagram

There have been some shows about Latinos in the United States, and titles such as Netflix’s Mr. Iglesias seem to be gaining more traction. However, Jane the Virgin could break into the mainstream, escaping the niche denominator of “Latino”. It was wonderful to see the very specific Florida Latinidad represented on the screen. 

2. The show discussed the uncomfortable issue of migration and the perilous path to citizenship. Te queremos, Alba!

Credit: cwjanethevirgin / Instagram

The show touched in one of the main issues that define the Latino experience in the United States: migration. Alba’s citizenship journey was equally stressful and hard to watch, and we are sure it resonated with millions of Latino families in how vulnerable migrants can be before attaining citizenship. A call to action that was also told in a tender, extremely human way. 

3. Jane proudly wore her Latina identity, in her life and literary work.

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Instead of trying to “fit in” with Anglo culture to blend, Jane Gloriana Villanueva embraces and celebrates her Latina identity. From her clothes to her cultural references (Chilean novelist Isabel Allende makes a cameo!) and her literary work, she tries to uncover what Latina identity means today in matters of love, family, sex and professional life. 

4. It showed us that true friendship with your exes and your exes’ exes is possible (you know this is a telenovela, right?)

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Well, maybe this is not that in tune with reality, pero se vale soñar. We love how Petra, Jane, and Rafael find a way to co-parent three cheeky monkeys. 

5. It gave us a strong, independent, queer woman.

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Petra is perhaps the character that developed the most. She went from being a terrible telenovela villana to being a member of the Villanueva clan. Her backstory is fascinating and through the seasons she found a way to discover herself: she is a survivor, and the ultimate way to survive is accepting who she is a powerful queer businesswoman, and a loving mother who allows herself to be vulnerable and ask for help. 

6. It serves us some old-world Latino charm.

Credit: cwjanethevirgin / Instagram

When Jane imagines her romantic epics, and also when Alba tells her life story, we get to see some of the old world Latino charms that have made the romantic narrative a staple of the region. This is also a way to deal with 

7. It provided us with one of the most truthful representations of the joys, frustrations, and awesomeness of parenthood.

Credit: cwjanethevirgin / Instagram

Right from her pregnancy, Jane embodied the shock and delights of motherhood. The show does not give us a vanilla version of how pregnancy sorta wrecks the female body and how hard it is to raise a child. Mateo is Jane’s world, and it is amazing to witness Jane embrace her power, but also her cluelessness as to how to be a mother. Nadie nace sabiendo

8. Four words: Rogelio De La Vega.

Credit: cwjanethevirgin / Instagram

Mexican actor Jaime Camil, a former telenovela heartthrob, found his ideal character in Rogelio De La Vega. He is funny and charming, vulnerable and the best father ever. We would totally watch a spin-off featuring only him! 

9. The genuine chemistry and friendship shared by the cast.

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Gina Rodriguez and Jaime Camil really do look like father and daughter in this photo. Judging by interviews and their social media accounts (including photos of Gina’s recent wedding), cast members have formed a true family offscreen, which translates into the amazing chemistry we see in the show. 

10. The show is a true picture of the multicultural United States.

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Yes, the cast is primarily Latino or plays Latino characters (even the blonde Michael has a Latino last name: Cordero), but the show has Eastern European, Anglo, Black and even Indian characters. Rather than being insular and only focus on Latinos, it is a mosaic of the cultural diversity of Florida, where the narrative takes place. 

11. Primero la familia: a message that resonated with Latino audiences worldwide.

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Through the show, we are witness to the perpetuation of family rituals. The Villanuevas have dinner together, come rain or come shine, and they spend time together even if they are upset at each other. Later in the show, Petra and Jane find a way to create new traditions for Mateo and the twins, unlikely half-siblings who are growing up together. 

12. Simply put, Jane the Virgin is funny as hell.

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Jane the Virgin is a cleverly written comedy that blends huge amounts of drama, very tender and human moments, and gags that are anything but cheap. Every joke or unusual situation in the show reveals something about the characters rather than looking for cheap laughs. For example, when Jane’s life spins out of control she usually becomes very clumsy: the physical comedy reveals characters’ inner state. We can also think of Rogelio’s hilarious gift baskets! (we wouldn’t mind getting one by the way). Or how Petra’s twins often make reference to the creepy duo from the horror film The Shining.

13. But above all, the show gives full agency to female characters, something rare in any TV show.

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In today’s media industry, it is extremely rare for a female-led television show or film to be approved, even more so if the character is a Latina played by a relatively unknown actress. Jane the Virgin was a rarity and a novelty: a sitcom that got pretty dark at times, which offered dialogue in Spanish and was unashamedly influenced by telenovelas. The Villanueva queens and Petra drove the narrative, un matriarcado televisivo like no other. Jane did not make her decisions solely based on what her romantic counterparts demanded: she was in control of her feelings, her sexuality and her experience as a mother. We will miss you, Jane hermosa.

READ: ‘Jane The Virgin’ Actress Opens Up About How Anxiety Kept Her From Showing Up To Set

Selena Gomez Is Fighting To Make Sure That Everyone Can Speak Openly And Honestly About Getting Help For Their Mental Health

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Is Fighting To Make Sure That Everyone Can Speak Openly And Honestly About Getting Help For Their Mental Health

selenagomez / Instagram

Selena Marie Gomez (born in Texas in 1992) has been in the public eye for as long as she can remember. She has been a role model for young girls as a singer and an actress and now is involved in more risqué films such as Spring Breakers, a delirious film by indie filmmaker Harmony Korine. Besides having a strong onscreen persona, Gomez has been in relationships with the likes of Justin Bieber, which of course turned the paparazzi attention and cameras to her. Suddenly, when she was barely a teenager her every move was being followed. Her life was sort of predestined to be great when she was named after the great late Selena Quintanilla. However, she has had to deal with divorce (her parents separated when she was five-years-old) and with weak health, as she was diagnosed with lupus, an auto-immune disease, which ultimately forced her to get a kidney transplant. She found strength in her mom. Gomez has said that her mother “was really strong around me. Having me at 16 had to have been a big responsibility. She gave up everything for me, had three jobs, supported me, sacrificed her life for me.” That must provide so much strength for a woman of barely 26 but who has gone through more in her lifetime than many 50-year-olds.

This must not be easy for anyone, even more so for a Latino woman. Gomez knows that she has a microphone and that she can get to other girls and women. “The older I get, the prouder I am to be a woman in the industry. When I was younger and running around all the time on tour, I don’t think I took the time to notice how being a woman in my position is really a gift. I want to make sure I utilize all that power,” the young Latina star told Into the GlossShe has used this position of privilege to raise awareness on mental health issues, including suicide prevention, both as a celebrity and as a producer. She is also a supporter of associations such as Make A Wish (which grants children diagnosed with life-threatening conditions), the Alliance for Children’s Rights and the Ryan Seacrest Foundation. 

Selena Gomez fights for friendships above anything else: girl power.

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Gomez values friendship and spreads the word. She has such loyal friends that one even donated a kidney when Gomez needed a transplant. She says: “People are put into your life for seasons, for different reasons, and to teach you lessons”: Selena, we couldn’t agree more.

She gets politically enraged when it matters.

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Gomez knows that a lot of mental health issues concerning young women are related to the policing of their sexuality and reproductive rights. She gets political when she feels the need to, particularly with issues concerning the mental health and general wellbeing of young women like herself. 

She asks her fans to be strong, but to also look for help when needed.

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Her advice: “I’ve learned there’s power deep down inside yourself, and you can find it when you don’t give up on yourself and when you ask for help.” This is so real it hurts: even someone like her, who in the eyes of her fans might seem to have it all, needs to be humble and honest in reaching out to others when the world seems bleak. There is always someone who cares if you are OK. 

She stands up for migrants.

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Gomez doesn’t get political often, but when she does she always stands up for the minority communities. She has been a vocal advocate for migrant rights and the rights of women. She even wore a 1973 necklace as one of very few Latina celebs speaking up for abortion rights.

She even takes a stand from DACA recipients and Dreamers.

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She has used her social media accounts, which have followers in the millions, to call her fans to action. She is clearly showing the world that she does care and she is paying attention. 

She delivers a message of self-acceptance, which led her to produce 13 Reasons Why.

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Gomez’s mother, Amanda, had her when she was just 16, and then raised her by herself. She was also the one that gave Gomez the book on which the Netflix show 13 Reasons Why is based. The show was controversial because it spoke about mental health issues and suicide, topics that are fundamental to discuss with young vulnerable populations but that remain a taboo. However, Gomez’s message is optimistic. She has said: “I promise you that each and every one of you is made to be who you are and that’s what’s so attractive and beautiful.” Preach! 

13 Reasons Why put mental health issues at the forefront of public media debate.

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“I get it all day, every day, that I’m not sexy enough, or I’m not cool enough, or if I did this I would be accepted… I promise you that each and every one of you is made to be who you are and that’s what’s so attractive and beautiful. Please don’t forget that, even when it gets hard,” she said in an interview for the Huffington PostAnd this is exactly the message that she conveys in her project. Taking on Jay Asher’s literary world, she and the series creative team were able to show mental health and suicide from all possible angles. 

She takes fame with a grain of salt.

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She has been famous for a big portion of her life, but she knows that todo es pasajero, and that at the end who you are does not depend merely on adulation: “You are not defined by an Instagram photo, by a ‘Like,’ by a comment. That does not define you.”

Body positivity is her mantra.

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“I feel very empowered and confident and comfortable with where I am. And I think it took me a long time to get there because, you know, the past year was so interesting because I’ve never been body-shamed before… I did gain weight, but I don’t care,” she said at On Air with Ryan SeacrestThis is a great, positive message for someone who is followed by millions of young women throughout the world, particularly in a day and age when standards of beauty are twisted and self-love is hard to achieve. 

She is an active advocate of girl power.

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Perhaps following the example of her mother, who basically raised her alone while holding down as many jobs as necessary to make ends meet, Gomez says: “I don’t want to become little or hurt or a victim. I want to be strong for girls…I just want them to know that there is an option of standing up for yourself.” Additionally, she was named a United Nations Ambassador in 2009, and in this role, she has worked particularly in empowering vulnerable children by helping provide clean water, education, and medical services. 

You learn from your mistakes.

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Perhaps most importantly, she knows that many see her as a role model and that this brings a huge deal of responsibility. “I’m human, I’m not perfect. I make mistakes all the time, but I guess my job is to keep those mistakes to myself, which I’m already fine doing and just try to be the best I can be for those kids,” she told E! Online.

READ: “13 Reasons Why” Does Much More Than Glorify Suicide, Selena Gomez Explained

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