Entertainment

Becky G Embraced Her Latinidad At The Amazon Prime Concert But Apparently Not Everyone Is Happy About It

Amazon threw a giant party to celebrate their annual Amazon Prime Day. It was basically a giant Amazon commercial, but also a concert! So, that’s fun.

Jane Lynch hosted and actors like Erin Moriarty stopped by to plug the Amazon series The Boys. Oh, also Taylor Swift headlined the event, but if you ask any Latino – the show was all about Becky G.

She took to the stage to debut a new single and truly stole the show. But, sadly, many fans who had tunedin for Taylor Swift had zero idea who the Latina icon was.

Yesterday was Amazon’s huge Prime Day Concert featuring some amazing talent, including Becky G.

Credit: @dualipahungary / Twitter

With a lineup consisting of Taylor Swift, SZA, Dua Lipa and Becky G, it’s safe to say that Amazon was looking to make an impression with their concert celebrating their Prime Day sale (which takes place next week). While the company went big last year with a special Ariana Grande set at a Brooklyn warehouse, this one was something else entirely.

The show, which was livestreamed to all 200 million Amazon Prime members across the globe, saw New York’s dowdy Hammerstein Ballroom tricked out to the hilt, with a gigantic video screen spanning the entire front of the ballroom — and eye-popping visuals ranging from digital effects to sprawling nature scenes — and a stage that was a light show in itself. There were fireworks and steam blasts and eye-popping lights and showers of confetti and streamers falling from the ceiling — framing, of course, performances from four of the most dynamic pop-leaning female artists working today.

The Mexican-American icon was excited to be a part of such an epic lineup.

Credit: @iambeckyg / Twitter

“I think it’s pretty dope that I get to be part of a lineup alongside badass girls like Taylor Swift, SZA and Dua Lipa,” Becky G told Billboard. “I love more than anything that we are very diverse. It’s awesome that we come from different places and speak different languages.”

And, as the only Latina performing at the event, Becky G added, “It’s awesome that Amazon provided an opportunity for artists like us to use their platform. The Internet is what changed my life and career.”

She also celebrated the fact each of the performers come from different places and speak different languages.

Credit: @ptswifty131 / Twitter

Yet people at the concert weren’t dancing and screaming as much when Becky G came out and then online things got even darker. There was a lot of chatter on Twitter from people upset that Becky G decided to sing in her native language.

Apparently, though, not everyone was happy for the Latina to sing in Spanish but, no worry, her fans were there to defend.

Apparently not everyone new what was going on. One user on Twitter said: “I just logged on what’s happening now? Who’s coming after Becky G? This is not going to happen again with another one of our Latina artist.”

Becky G’s fans were seriously not having any of it.

Credit: @daniexdelicate_ / Twitter

People were pissed off that some were upset about the Mexican-American singing her new single, Dollar, in Spanish – her native language.

Latinos came out swinging at people who had a problem with Becky G embracing her Latinidad.

Credit: @jomyxjomax / Twitter

Many people upset at Becky G for sining in Spanish seemed to not realize that Amazon Prime is a global service with service in dozens of languages around the world.

And yes, Prime is available in Spanish and there are Mexican, Chilean, and Colombian subscribers. So it only makes sense to have featured a Latina artist to represent a huge portion of Amazon Prime’s audience.

Many pointed out the disgusting irony between reactions to Becky G and Justin Bieber singing in Spanish.

Credit: @seokiex18 / Twitter

Justin Bieber can take to a stage and make a not so great attempt at singing in Spanish and he’s called genius and open-minded and multitalented. But if a Latina signs in Spanish – her native language – people are coming for her.

Despite all the drama, let’s remember these two amazing moments that show just how far Becky G has come in her career.

Credit; @TSUpdatesNYBU / Twitter

She went from posing with a wax figure of Taylor Swift to performing alongside her at one of the year’s biggest concerts. Bravo Becky!

READ: It Looks Like We All Have A Lot More In Common With Becky G Than Just A Love For Mayores

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A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

Culture

A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

ricardostuckert / Instagram

Indigenous tribes are the most important connection between man and nature. These tribes have lived off the land before modern society and many have never interacted with modern society. Ricardo Stuckert is going through and documenting the indigenous Amazonian tribes in Brazil.

Ricardo Stuckert is photographing indigenous tribespeople in the Brazilian Amazon.

The indigenous community is something sacred that most people agrees should be protected. They are more connected to the land than we are. Their customs and traditions are more ingrained in this world than ours are and it is so important to protect them.

The indigenous community of Brazil has been subjected to horrible attacks and conditions from the Brazilian government.

One of the most widespread attacks against the indigenous Brazilians living in the Amazon has been for the land. President Jair Bolsonaro has tried to take land away from the indigenous communities to allow for logging and mining. A bill he sent to the congress sought to exploit the land for commercial purposes, even legalizing some of the attacks we have seen on indigenous people since President Bolsonaro took power.

Stuckert wants to preserve the indigenous culture and customs through photos.

“I think it is important to disseminate Brazilian culture and show the way that native peoples live today,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “In 1997, I started to photograph the Amazon and had my first contact with the native people of Brazil. Since then, I have tried to show the diversity and plurality of indigenous culture, as well as emphasize the importance of the Indians as guardians of the forest. There are young people who are being born who have never seen or will see an Indian in their lives.”

The photographer believes that using photography is the best way to share culture.

“I think that photography has this power to transpose a culture like this to thousands of people,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “The importance of documentary photojournalism is to undo stigmas and propagate a culture that is being lost. We need to show the importance of indigenous people to the world, for the protection of our forests.”

You can see all of Stuckert’s photos on his Instagram.

Stuckert’s work to documented the indigenous community is giving people an insight into a life many never see. Brazil is home to about 210 million people with around 1 million having indigenous heritage. The diverse indigenous community of Brazil is something important to showcase and that’s what Stuckert is doing.

READ: Indigenous Photographer Diego Huerta’s Photos Of Oaxaca’s Indigenous People Celebrates Their Beauty

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The ‘Sistine Chapel Of The Amazon’ Was Just Discovered In Colombia And It’s One Of The Largest Rock Art Collections Ever Found

Culture

The ‘Sistine Chapel Of The Amazon’ Was Just Discovered In Colombia And It’s One Of The Largest Rock Art Collections Ever Found

Robert Alexander / Getty Images

All too often artists from Latin America – particularly Indigenous artists – are overlooked for their contribution to the world’s art scene. This isn’t just true of today’s artists but also dating back hundreds of years.

White-centric art critics have praised the works of artists like Rembrandt and Van Gogh, while ignoring the immense contributions that artists on the other side of the Atlantic were making hundreds or even thousands of years earlier.

Now, as a nearly 13,000-year-old rock art collection is discovered by researchers deep in the Colombian Amazon, this long lost history of Indigenous art is finally having its moment in the spotlight.

Researchers discovered one of the world’s largest and oldest collections of ancient rock art.

One of the world’s largest collections of prehistoric rock art has been discovered in the Amazon Rainforest. Researches are hailing it as the “Sistine Chapel of the Ancients,” and it’s guaranteed to bring a new level of attention on both the art and civilization of ancient America.

The rock art paintings, which number in the tens of thousands, are said to have been created up to 12,500 years ago. Perhaps even more staggering, they’re painted on well-worn cliff faces that stretch across nearly eight miles deep in the Colombian jungle. Experts say that because of the size of the site, it will take generations to study.

Although news of the rock art is just being released to the public, it was actually discovered last year as part of a film by the BBC: Jungle Mystery: Lost Kingdoms of the Amazon.

The site is in the Serranía de la Lindosa where, along with the Chiribiquete national park, other rock art had been found. The documentary’s presenter, Ella Al-Shamahi, an archaeologist and explorer, told the Observer: “The new site is so new, they haven’t even given it a name yet.”

The discovery highlights the lives of some of the very first people who called the Americas home.

The team who made the discovery is a joint British-Colombian group, funded by the European Research Council. Its leader is José Iriarte, professor of archaeology at Exeter University in the U.K. and a leading expert on the Amazon and pre-Columbian history.

He said: “When you’re there, your emotions flow … We’re talking about several tens of thousands of paintings. It’s going to take generations to record them … Every turn you do, it’s a new wall of paintings.”

The team found it hard to keep it a secret given the level of excitement and emotion they felt upon the discovery.

“We started seeing animals that are now extinct. The pictures are so natural and so well made that we have few doubts that you’re looking at a horse, for example. The ice-age horse had a wild, heavy face. It’s so detailed, we can even see the horse hair. It’s fascinating.”

The images include fish, turtles, lizards and birds, as well as people dancing and holding hands, among other scenes. One figure wears a mask resembling a bird with a beak.

It’s estimated that the thousands of pieces of rock art are nearly 13,000 years old.

Although no official carbon dating has been carried out to gauge the age of the art, experts are estimating its age based partly on the depictions of long-extinct ice age animals, such as the mastodon, a prehistoric relative of the elephant that hasn’t roamed South America for at least 12,000 years. There are also images of the palaeolama, an extinct camelid, as well as giant sloths and ice age horses.

These animals were all seen and painted by some of the very first humans ever to reach the Amazon. Their pictures give a glimpse into a lost, ancient civilization that many of our ancestors call on as part of our history.

The site is deep in rebel-controlled territory so it’s unlikley to become a tourist hotspot anytime soon.

Credit: Luis Acosta / Getty Images

The site of the discovery, the Serranía La Lindosa, sits deep in the rebel-controlled Colombian rainforest. As the documentary notes, Colombia is a land torn apart after 50 years of civil war that raged between FARC guerrillas and the Colombian government, now with an uneasy truce in place.

The territory where the paintings have been discovered was completely off limits until recently and still involves careful negotiation to enter safely.

Al-Shamahi said: “When we entered Farc territory, it was exactly as a few of us have been screaming about for a long time. Exploration is not over. Scientific discovery is not over but the big discoveries now are going to be found in places that are disputed or hostile.”

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