Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s Concert Parade Made History And Shined A Light On Latino Communities In NYC

Leave it to Bad Bunny to elevate the art of a virtual concert with his first live performance in this era of the Coronavirus pandemic.

The beloved San Benito performed a concert on the back of a flatbed truck slowly driving through the Bronx, Washington Heights, and Harlem. The reggaetonero’s set was streamed as part of Uforia’s monthly music series, through which the music outlet, owned by Univision, has lined up concerts to the end of the year. “It was difficult for me to do a concert without an audience. I didn’t want to,” Bad Bunny said during the show, according to Billboard. “But I’m accepting the new reality and I hope people enjoy this. We need it.”

Based upon the hype and reviews, it’s obvious that we the people loved it.

Bad Bunny’s free NYC concert made history as he paraded across the city in a flatbed truck.

Bad Bunny’s moving concert, which started outside Yankee Stadium and at certain points had him literally ducking under traffic light and bridges, was livestreamed on the Uforia app and his own YouTube channel. The hit concert featured songs off his February album YHLQMDLG, including “Si Veo a Tu Mamá,” “La Difícil,” and “Pero Ya No,” among others.

The history-making performance concluded outside Harlem Hospital, where the rapper thanked front-line medical workers for their efforts during the coronavirus quarantine, and performed his song “Yo Perreo Sola.”

“Respect and thanks to those people who have sacrificed their lives in this city,” Bad Bunny told the crowd, per Billboard. “With a lot of faith in God, I sense that good things are coming. I know we are going through very difficult times. I have made thousands of mistakes, but my only mission is to try to be a better person every day.”

The hit concert coincided with the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria.

Bad Bunny’s concert was a celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month but it also fell on the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria, which devastated Bad Bunny’s home of Puerto Rico. He thanked Latinos for supporting him and offered words of encouragement during the pandemic.

“With a lot of faith in God, I sense that good things are coming,” he added. “I know we are going through very difficult times, but I have hope that people doing things with their heart, spirit, faith and hope, we’re going to move forward.”

Bad Bunny was joined by virtual appearances from reggaeton stars J Balvin, Sech and Mora. The show was produced by Univision’s Uforia, the radio broadcasting and music events division of the company. 

“We are extremely excited to celebrate the richness of Latinx culture during Hispanic Heritage Month with this one-of-a-kind live streaming experience, and also commemorate the Puerto Rico community’s resilience on the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria, in partnership with Verizon,” Jesus Lara, president of radio at Univision, said in a statement. “We are proud to showcase the artistry of Bad Bunny who has had such a profound impact on our culture and the music industry at large.”

Imagine being the lucky resident of this building with a view like this…

A live stream showed the Latin Grammy award-winning artist dodging traffic lights and excited fans chasing him down streets with their cellphones in hand in New York City. 

El Conejo Malo literally brought the concert to people’s doorsteps. He also used the concert as a chance to shine a light on his native Puerto Rico and the third anniversary of Hurricane Maria that devastated the area. P.R. is still in recovery he mentioned. As the sun went down, Benito tore through the hits from his first album X 100pre like “Ni Bien Ni Bien,” “Sólo de Mí,” and “Romana”.

Although Coronavirus has had a major impact on the music industry, Bad Bunny has found ways to keep himself plenty busy.

CREDIT: EMMA MCINTYRE / GETTY IMAGES

Despite spending most of the year in quarantine in his native Puerto Rico, Bad Bunny has been extremely busy. From gracing magazine covers and making history in the process to surprise releasing an entire album, Bad Bunny has kept his fans on their toes.

The reggaetonero was also set to perform two sold-out shows on October 30-31 at San Juan’s Hiram Bithorn stadium, but they’ve been canceled in the wake of Covid-19. So this was the first chance for San Benito fans to witness live renditions from his record-breaking 2020 album YHLQMDLG, and his follow-up surprise album Las Que No Iban a Salir.

The “Yo Perrea Sola” singer also collaborated with Dua Lipa, J Balvin, and Tainy on a hit single, “Un Día (One Day)”. He’s also set to be recognized with the Hispanic Heritage Award for Vision in recognition for his impact as an artist and activist.

You can rewatch the full show here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

Entertainment

Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

STILLZ

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic that grips the globe, Latin music in the U.S. saw a 20 percent rise in streaming revenue in 2020. The genre posted a fifth consecutive year of overall revenue growth last year, according to the RIAA on Wednesday.

Latin music posted its best revenue in the U.S. since 2005.

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) released the 2020 year-end report on Latin music.

“Latin music continues to ‘punch above its weight’ – posting its fifth straight year of growth amidst the challenges and disruptions of the COVID economy,” wrote RIAA COO Michele Ballantyne in an annual revenue report.

After accounting for 5 percent of overall music revenue in the U.S. in 2019, that percentage rose to 5.4 percent last year. Latin music is heavily consumed on streaming and video platforms. Revenue for the genre is at its highest since 2005, the era when reggaeton music first broke through thanks to Puerto Rican acts like Daddy Yankee, Ivy Queen, and Tego Caulderón.

Bad Bunny had the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020.

Over a decade later, and it’s still reggaeton and Boricua artists that are leading the pack of Latin music stars. According to the RIAA, Bad Bunny’s “Yo Perreo Sola” was the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020. The hit song from his Grammy and Latin Grammy-winning YHLQMDLG album was certified 24-times Diamante. The RIAA is responsible for certifying albums and singles as platinum and gold. Latin music accounted for 15 percent of the certifications in 2020.

The news about Bad Bunny shouldn’t be a surprise as Spotify revealed last year that he was the most-streamed artist globally on the platform. He was followed by Canadian superstar Drake and Colombian reggaeton singer J Balvin.

The RIAA credits Latin music’s 20 percent streaming growth in 2020 to the fans who are turning to paid streaming subscriptions. YouTube is another major platform where Latin music is consumed. Billboard reported that 30 percent of the top 100 music videos of 2020 were from Latin music artists.  

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Bad Bunny and Kali Uchis Win Their First Grammy Awards, Jhay Cortez Performs “Dákiti” with Benito

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

Latidomusic

Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

OVI_OFICIAL / INSTAGRAM

Ozuna is the latest reggaeton superstar to get into the world of corridos tumbados. The Boricua singer teams up with rising Cuban artist Ovi in the music video for “Envidioso.”

Ovi is helping globalize the corridos tumbados sound.

Ovi is the artist that’s getting all the reggaeton and Latin trap stars to embrace the corridos tumbados sound. On his most recent album, Retumban2, he teamed up with artists like Mora, Myke Towers, Mariah Angeliq, and CJ. Bad Bunny was the first reggaeton artist to jump over to the corridos tumbados side when he joined Mexican singer Natanael Cano on the “Soy El Diablo” remix in 2019.

Ovi wanted to collaborate with Ozuna and he made it happen.

Ovi getting Ozuna in his song “Envidioso” was a moment of manifesting. The Rancho Humilde artist wrote on Instagram before that it was a goal of his to collaborate with Ozuna and he made that a reality.

To be honest, “Envidioso” is not a full corridos tumbados song, but rather a musical compromise between the genre and the emerging drill music sound. The corridos guitar can be heard over a fresh trap music beat. Like in CJ’s “Whoopty” remix, Ozuna comes through with bars. Ovi holds his own as they unite in keeping the haters in check. This genre-bending collaboration just oozes with swagger.

Ozuna and Ovi are having a blast in the music video for “Envidioso.” Whether they’re working in the back of a restaurant together, in the aisles of a generic Oxxo, or flexing in front of a sports car, these guys find the time to vibe to their song. This duo shares fun on-screen chemistry as collaborators.

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Ovi is Globalizing Corridos Tumbados: Our 5 Favorite Songs on ‘Retumban2’

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com