Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

So much of this year has been spent inside our apartments singing and dancing to Bad Bunny hits like “Safaera” and “Yo Perreo Sola” or looking through countless magazines that made him their cover boy.

It seems that 2020 is peak Bad Bunny, as the reggaetónero takes over the world bringing us hit after hit while bringing perreo into the mainstream.

Now, in his latest cover story in The Culture Issue of the New York Times, San Benito gives us insight into what his 2020 has been like, what we can expect from him in the not so distant future and what being a Puerto Rican super star means to him.

Bad Bunny is taking over the world and his latest interview with the New York Times details just how he plans to do it.

‘The World According to Bad Bunny’ – that is what graces the cover of the New York Times’ latest Culture Issue. And it catches your eye – his full face, including his now signature mustache – force you to do a double take to soak in all of his glory. Or maybe that was just my reaction…

Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio — more popularly known as Bad Bunny, San Benito, El Conejo Malo — is the reggaetónero we’ve all fallen in love with and who is topping charts throughout the world. 

His latest feature story covers everything from his love for Puerto Rico to his next album, but it’s also another major step for the artist in putting both is home and the Latino community on the world stage.

His profile begins with Bad Bunny discussing his album YHLQMDLG, which begins with the song “Si Veo a Tu Mamá”, which has a verse we can all relate to in 2020: “maldito Año Nuevo” (or “this damn new year”). But despite all the BS that 2020 has thrown our way, Bad Bunny has managed to shine through by being an advocate when it comes to so many issues.

Bad Bunny says he feels like an “athlete representing his Puerto Rico at the Olympics.“

San Benito has made it his mission to put his homeland on the map and to showcase to the world the problems that Boricuas face on the island. In the interview, Bad Bunny describes himself as an athlete representing Puerto Rico in the Olympics.

Those problems he speaks of include the island’s status as a commonwealth territory of the U.S. which means its citizens on the island cannot vote for president or have any voting representatives in Congress. 

The natural disasters of Hurricane Maria, Irma and the earthquakes that rung in 2020 also add to the laundry list of problems, and also came with little financial help from Trump’s federal government, which has left Puerto Rico in a vulnerable state to this day.

In language, Caribbean Spanish like that of Puerto Rico is heavily criticized by the so-called sophisticated Latin Americans, but they all bop their heads to Bad Bunny tunes like “Safaera,” “La Romana,” and more.

So many of us love Bad Bunny for his constant activism and he doesn’t disappoint in this NYT piece.

Bad Bunny is known for breaking cultural stereotypes, shattering boundaries others couldn’t dream of, and advocating for women. He’s even openly talked about depression, and shown the world it is okay not to feel okay.

His activism has also shown support for the trans community with the video “Yo Perreo Sola,” dressed in drag, or when he’s done public appearances wearing a skirt and a shirt that read “mataron a alexa, no a un hombre en falda.”

However, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Benito was suspiciously mute — no posts on social media, no interviews. He seemed to have disappeared at a moment that so many of us could of benefited from his compassion. Many criticized the singer for his silence.

But on June 12, a TIME article was published about him speaking out, through email exchanges, and how he did not want to just send a basic message, but rather go deeper to “support the fight against a systematic monster that’s been [around for] centuries.”

Bad Bunny also speaks out about reggaetón’s black roots – which so often go unmentioned.

Credit: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

As for inspirations, Benito called out the prominent Black stars who helped shape reggaetón into the phenomenon that is it today. He admits that’s something he’s still learning about. “As a child, for better or worse, I always lived in my bubble,” Benito says. “Now, I could say – and people do say – it’s a form of privilege. But it’s always been my way of being. Me, in my house and in my bubble, imagining a better, more magical world.”

As he ascends into the pop mainstream, Bad Bunny also opens up about returning reggaetón to its Puerto Rican roots on his album YHLQMDLG. “Since reggaetón went pop all over the world, I don’t feel like people really know the sound that raised me, that I grew up studying,” he says. “This is the album I would’ve wanted to release when I was 15 and dreamed of being a singer.” Benito also hints to the next project, adding, “My next album doesn’t have anything to do with YHLQMDLG.”

It’s a long interview but, come on, it’s with Bad Bunny so the entire interview is worth the read. You can check out the NYT piece here.

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Urban Divas United Highlights: Ivy Queen’s Throwbacks, Nesi Perrea Sola And More

Latidomusic

Urban Divas United Highlights: Ivy Queen’s Throwbacks, Nesi Perrea Sola And More

IVYQUEENDIVA / INSTAGRAM

Over the weekend, the Urban Divas United concert was streamed online. Puerto Rican icon Ivy Queen led an impressive lineup of women that included rising stars like Chesca and Mariah Angeliq. Nesi from Bad Bunny’s “Yo Perreo Sola” also appeared.

Ivy Queen’s “Yo Quiero Bailar” live was everything.

The queen of reggaeton music, Ivy Queen, was the headliner of the night. This was her first time performing since singing with Gloria Trevi at Premio Lo Nuestro in February. Ivy queen came through with the classics like “Yo Quiero Bailar.”

Ivy also performed with the other women in the show.

In the spirit of camaraderie among the women, Ivy Queen also performed live duets. A standout was Ivy Queen’s performance of her bachatón hit “Te He Querido Te He Llorado” with Goyo of ChocQuibTown, Nesi, and Chesca. Ivy Queen also teamed up with Spanish pop star Natalia Jiménez for her powerful ballad “La Vida Es Así.”

Puerto Rican singer Chesca performed her latest single “Como Tú (Dirty).”

Her collaborator De La Ghetto appeared from a video on the ground as she was dancing. Mariah Angeliq, who featured on recent albums by Karol G and Ovi, also took to the stage. She performed her breakthrough hit “Perreito.”  

You can watch the whole show below.

Nesi, who wrote and sings on Bad Bunny’s hit from his YHLQMDLG album, performed the perreo-de-résistance alone. Other performers of the night included La Duraca, Corina Smith, Nohemy, and Snow Tha Product. Urban Divas United was presented by Neutrogena in collaboration with Conciencia Collective.

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Read: Music Videos You Need To Watch This Week: RBD, Chesca, Anthony Ramos and More

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Bad Bunny Defeats The Miz, Announces U.S. Tour Dates at WWE Wrestlemania

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Defeats The Miz, Announces U.S. Tour Dates at WWE Wrestlemania

WWE

Bad Bunny made all his dreams come true this weekend at Wrestlemania. The Puerto Rican superstar defeated his WWE rival The Miz and announced a U.S. tour.

Bad Bunny and The Miz finally faced off in the ring.

Bad Bunny made his Wrestlemania debut on Saturday night. After the past few months of a growing rivalry with Mike “The Miz” Mizanin, the two took it to the ring in a main event match. Benito walked out to his song “Booker T,” an homage to the WWE legend. It was exciting to hear the announcer say, “From Vega Baja, Puerto Rico: Bad Bunny!” Benito teamed up with Damien Priest against The Miz and John Morrison. After a few high-flying moves, the Boricua duo emerged victorious.

Like many wrestling fans, The Miz was impressed by Bad Bunny’s Wrestlemania debut.

The WWE caught up with The Miz and Morrison after their defeat. The Miz echoed much of the WWE fandom’s thoughts that night after seeing Bad Bunny commit to his performance in the ring. “I can’t believe I’m actually going to say this, but he gained my respect,” The Miz said. Morrison made a bad pun after saying there was a “luck factor” involved because “rabbits are lucky.”

Triple H helped Bad Bunny announce his 2022 U.S. tour.

During night two of Wrestlemania, Bad Bunny dropped his surprise announcement of his 2022 U.S. Tour. In the clip, WWE legend Triple H thanks Benito for his “amazing” job at Wrestlemania and then passes him a suitcase. While sitting on top of his El Último Tour Del Mundo big rig, Bad Bunny finds a microphone inside of the suitcase.

Bad Bunny’s U.S. Tour will kick off on Feb. 9 in Denver. From dates revealed so far, the tour will run until April 2022. The tickets go on-sale on Friday, April 16, at 12PM local time.

Bad Bunny 2022 U.S. Tour Dates:

2/9 Denver CO – Ball Arena
2/11 El Paso, TX – Utep Don Haskins Center
2/13 Hidalgo, TX – Payne Arena
2/16 Houston, TX – Toyota Center
2/18 Dallas, TX – American Airlines Center
2/23 San Diego, CA – Pechanga Arena
2/24 Los Angeles, CA – Staples Center
2/25 Inglewood, CA – The Forum
2/28 Portland, OR – Moda Center
3/1 Seattle, WA – Climate Pledge Arena
3/3 San Jose, CA – SAP Center
3/5 Las Vegas, NV – MGM Grand Garden Arena
3/6 Phoenix, AZ – Phoenix Suns Arena
3/10 Rosemont, IL – Allstate Arena
3/14 Toronto, ON – Scotiabank Arena
3/16 Philadelphia, PA – Wells Fargo Center
3/18 Newark, NJ – Prudential Center
3/19 Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center
3/22 Boston, MA – TD Garden
3/23 Montreal, QC – Bell Center
3/25 Washington, DC – Capital One Arena
3/26 Charlotte, NJ – Spectrum Center
3/27 Atlanta, GA – State Farm Arena
3/29 Orlando, FL – Amway Center
4/1 Miami, FL – American Airlines Arena

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Read: Bad Bunny is Going to Wrestlemania: His Road to the WWE Main Event

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