Entertainment

Bad Bunny Makes History As He Shines On The Cover Of ‘Playboy’ And Looks Good Doing It

Where in the world is San Benito? That’s what so many of his fans have been asking as the iconic reggaetónero has gone AWOL from social media since the end of May. But now he’s popped up in what some consider the most unlikely of places – on the cover of Playboy magazine.

Aside from looking absolutely incredible across two different covers for the magazine, Bad Bunny has also made history in several different ways from being on the cover of the classic magazine – and for those of us who were missing near daily Bad Bunny updates, the magazine is throwing us a lifeline.

Bad Bunny is the latest cover star of Playboy magazine, and the moment is history-making for several reasons.

Like many magazines these days, Playboy has decided to go digital and last week they released their first ever completely digital magazine – with El Conejo Malo blessing the cover.

Shot by celebrity photographer Stillz in Miami, Florida, the images accompanying the feature article “Bad Bunny is Not Playing God,” showcase the artist’s exuberant style. He is pictured modeling everything from a gold Versace toga, accessorized with a crown of laurels and chains, to elaborate nail art. His lips in one close-up shot are even garnished with tiny Playboy bunnies.

Yes, Bad Bunny looks incredible. But he also made history. The Puerto Rican singer is Playboy’s first-ever digital cover star with two covers. He’s also the only man – aside from the late Playboy founder Hugh Hefner – to appear solo on the cover of the cult-favorite publication.

Along with two different cover photos, Bad Bunny speaks at length about various topics in an interview.

Credit: David Chavez / Getty Images

In his extensive interview, Bad Bunny gets candid about this genre-breaking music and style, and spoke of being an LGBTQ+ and femme ally in the machismo world of Latin music. “I do all of this and I’m not even sure what I cause,” he says. “It’s not until someone comes up to me and tells me, ‘Man, thank you,’ that I realize the impact.”

Bad Bunny’s “impact” is past music, his gender-fluid style and political outspokenness have made him an especially fascinating and beloved fixture in reggaetón and beyond.

He continued, “There’s nothing worse than being somewhere and feeling like you don’t belong. I’ve been trying to make sure everybody feels part of the culture of reggaetón. I want to make sure they feel that they have someone there, that friend that can stand up for them.”

“I think I have an audience split in two: fans of Bad Bunny and fans of reggaetón itself, and I want to merge the two,” he explained. “I feel I have a big sector to educate. There’s a lot of people who won’t pay attention to other people calling them out, but they follow Bad Bunny. If he tells them what’s good, maybe they can grow as people and come to accept others.”

He also discusses sex, love, and machismo in the industry.

Credit: STILLZ / Playboy

In the Playboy article, Bunny talks about love: “I think that sex is a giant world, and everyone is free to see it as they want and do it with whoever they want, however they want, with infinite possibilities.”

He also shares on the success of his second album “Yo Hago Lo Que Me Da La Gana” (“I Do Whatever I Want”), which shot to No.2 on the US Billboard chart, and became the highest-charting all-Spanish language album of all time, with tracks that tackle sexism head-on.

Bad Bunny’s new music video has a really important message about twerking. “The music industry and society in general (treat women) like they’re nothing,” he is quoted as saying. “Women are human beings and deserve respect and the same treatment as anybody else.”

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Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

Entertainment

Latin Music Revenue in the U.S. Grew in 2020, Up 20 Percent in Streaming

STILLZ

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic that grips the globe, Latin music in the U.S. saw a 20 percent rise in streaming revenue in 2020. The genre posted a fifth consecutive year of overall revenue growth last year, according to the RIAA on Wednesday.

Latin music posted its best revenue in the U.S. since 2005.

The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) released the 2020 year-end report on Latin music.

“Latin music continues to ‘punch above its weight’ – posting its fifth straight year of growth amidst the challenges and disruptions of the COVID economy,” wrote RIAA COO Michele Ballantyne in an annual revenue report.

After accounting for 5 percent of overall music revenue in the U.S. in 2019, that percentage rose to 5.4 percent last year. Latin music is heavily consumed on streaming and video platforms. Revenue for the genre is at its highest since 2005, the era when reggaeton music first broke through thanks to Puerto Rican acts like Daddy Yankee, Ivy Queen, and Tego Caulderón.

Bad Bunny had the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020.

Over a decade later, and it’s still reggaeton and Boricua artists that are leading the pack of Latin music stars. According to the RIAA, Bad Bunny’s “Yo Perreo Sola” was the highest-certified Latin music single of 2020. The hit song from his Grammy and Latin Grammy-winning YHLQMDLG album was certified 24-times Diamante. The RIAA is responsible for certifying albums and singles as platinum and gold. Latin music accounted for 15 percent of the certifications in 2020.

The news about Bad Bunny shouldn’t be a surprise as Spotify revealed last year that he was the most-streamed artist globally on the platform. He was followed by Canadian superstar Drake and Colombian reggaeton singer J Balvin.

The RIAA credits Latin music’s 20 percent streaming growth in 2020 to the fans who are turning to paid streaming subscriptions. YouTube is another major platform where Latin music is consumed. Billboard reported that 30 percent of the top 100 music videos of 2020 were from Latin music artists.  

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Bad Bunny and Kali Uchis Win Their First Grammy Awards, Jhay Cortez Performs “Dákiti” with Benito

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Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

Latidomusic

Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

OVI_OFICIAL / INSTAGRAM

Ozuna is the latest reggaeton superstar to get into the world of corridos tumbados. The Boricua singer teams up with rising Cuban artist Ovi in the music video for “Envidioso.”

Ovi is helping globalize the corridos tumbados sound.

Ovi is the artist that’s getting all the reggaeton and Latin trap stars to embrace the corridos tumbados sound. On his most recent album, Retumban2, he teamed up with artists like Mora, Myke Towers, Mariah Angeliq, and CJ. Bad Bunny was the first reggaeton artist to jump over to the corridos tumbados side when he joined Mexican singer Natanael Cano on the “Soy El Diablo” remix in 2019.

Ovi wanted to collaborate with Ozuna and he made it happen.

Ovi getting Ozuna in his song “Envidioso” was a moment of manifesting. The Rancho Humilde artist wrote on Instagram before that it was a goal of his to collaborate with Ozuna and he made that a reality.

To be honest, “Envidioso” is not a full corridos tumbados song, but rather a musical compromise between the genre and the emerging drill music sound. The corridos guitar can be heard over a fresh trap music beat. Like in CJ’s “Whoopty” remix, Ozuna comes through with bars. Ovi holds his own as they unite in keeping the haters in check. This genre-bending collaboration just oozes with swagger.

Ozuna and Ovi are having a blast in the music video for “Envidioso.” Whether they’re working in the back of a restaurant together, in the aisles of a generic Oxxo, or flexing in front of a sports car, these guys find the time to vibe to their song. This duo shares fun on-screen chemistry as collaborators.

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Ovi is Globalizing Corridos Tumbados: Our 5 Favorite Songs on ‘Retumban2’

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