Entertainment

Bad Bunny Pushes Back Against Homophobia And Celebrates Gender Fluidity In New Video For ‘Caro’

Bad Bunny / YouTube

There are many negative generalizations about Latino men including, among others, that they are machistas and homophobic. In the music industry, discrimination, and bigotry also persist. One needs to look no further than a recent tweet by Puerto Rican Don Omar to witness the negativity and his downright offensiveness toward the LGBT community. Instead of promoting Omar’s tweet, we rather share the openness and positive stance that another Latino musical artist decided to tweet in response to him.

credit: Twitter @DonOmar

Bad Bunny responded to Don Omar’s bigotry against the LGBT and tweed: “Homophobia in this day and age? How embarrassing, loco.”

Bad Bunny isn’t just backing up the LGBT community with a tweet, he’s celebrating who he is and that he isn’t afraid to show it.

In his latest music video titled “Caro,” Bad Bunny proudly shows off his gender fluidity.

CREDIT: YouTube

The Puerto Rican Latin trap artist has always been firm about his fluidity as a male, despite the closemindedness of others. In an interview with Refinery29, Bad Bunny opened up about his desire to wear nail polish and his eccentric way of dressing.

credit: instagram @badbunnypr

“Men also take care of themselves,” he said. “There is no need to criticize why one decides to maintain themselves one type of way. Stop the ignorance and let’s think with a more open mind. We’re in 2018, and we are supposed to have equality.”

credit: instagram @badbunnypr

From that moment on, the video then takes on a female lead and features other women of color of every shape and size walking down the fashion runway.  The video, directed by Fernando Lugo and Bad Bunny, also features women you normally never see in music videos, let alone a rap music video, including a drag queen, a pregnant woman, and young girl with Down Syndrome.

READ: No Matter How Famous He Gets, Bad Bunny Will Never Forget The Place And People That Made Him

Bad Bunny’s decision to highlight the gender spectrum in his music video is striking a chord with fans.

In “Caro” we see him in his true form, and it’s so refreshing to see a male rapper pushing back against the typical heteronormative narratives we constantly see in music videos. In “Caro” — which means expensive in Spanish — Bad Bunny is getting his nails painted and then in an instant he becomes female, and she has the same buzz cut that he does.

Bad Bunny’s “Caro” is the latest song and video to push the boundaries of sexuality in Latin music.

Major Latin music artist are standing up for their queer, female, and gender non-conforming fans like never before and it is resonating with everyone. As a society, we are learning more and more about the ever-growing and ever-changing landscape of gender identity and gender expression. Bad Bunny is one musical artist that is leaning into his own gender expression.

The inclusivity and acceptance in “Caro” are bringing joy to so many people that need this message.

Bad Bunny’s video shows the world, or at least those watching, just how diverse and intricate the world is around them. We are far past the days of a gender binary and archaic standards of beauty that only value one set of traits over another.

Some people are still stunned by the end of the video and the powerful message from a male, Latin trap rapper.

By the end of the 4-minute video, Bad Bunny returns and begins getting kissed on the cheek by women and men. The video finishes with Bad Bunny face-to-face with his female counterpart, almost as if they’re looking at a mirror version of themselves and engage in a kiss.

See the masterful video yourself below.


READ: Test Your Bad Bunny Fandom By Taking This Quiz On The ‘Esta Rico’ Lyrics

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This Father Hates Reggaetón But His Daughter Is A Bad Bunny Super Fan So They Wrote A Play About It

Entertainment

This Father Hates Reggaetón But His Daughter Is A Bad Bunny Super Fan So They Wrote A Play About It

Kevin Winter / Getty Images

There is nothing that a Latino dad wouldn’t do for his princesa and that includes, apparently, writing a play about her and her adoration for the Boricua pop culture icon known as Bad Bunny. If that wasn’t enough, his daughter takes center stage at the play. Keep on reading for more on this adorbs padre-hija collaboration. If you are in Puerto Rico and are a Bad Bunny fan, you should definitely have a look… at least out of curiosity. 

The title of the play is “Mi Hija Ama a Bad Bunny”, o sea “My Daughter Loves Bad Bunny” and it will have a limited run at the end of the month.

Credit: Nuevo Día

The play was written by this man, Agustín Rosario, who will also direct. The play will have a limited run on September 27-29 at the Teatro Arrivi in Santurce and has previously done the rounds in community theaters throughout la isla del encanto. Seeing a family collaboration on the stage must be pretty special! Rosario had enjoyed success with two previous plays, “Hijas de su madre” and “Nos vamos pal cara”. Rosario returns to acting, and says: “I am acting again to be with my daughter in her professional debut and to collaborate in her development as an actor. 

It is being described as a comedy that explores an intergenerational clash… the dad hates reggaeton and the daughter lives for it! 

Credit: Instagram. @badbunnypr

Long story short, the dad thinks that Bad Bunny’s lyrics and overall persona is violent and not a good influence for his little princess. This is all told as the father is going through a marital breakup, so he is not in a very good place. He seems to be the typical viejo gruñón. So the table is set for a good old fashioned telenovela-like plot with plenty of enredos.

As Nuevo Dia describes it, the show is about “A generational gap and resentment due to his divorce”. Sounds like one of those movies that Robert DeNiro has starred in recently.

The male protagonist not only takes on his own personal crusade against music, but also against technology and anything else that doesn’t fit into his narrow, conservative worldview. The cast also includes Agustin Rosario, Ile Nicole Rosario, Noelia Crespo, Ali Warrington and Deddie Romero. 

The plot line is very similar to a real life story about a father who spoke out against the gender violence inherent in Bad Bunny’s lyrics… only for his daughter to ACTUALLY STAR in one of the raeggetonero’s music videos!

Credit: “Callaita”, YouTube, Bad Bunny

The poor man’s name is Pepo García and earlier this year he published a post on Facebook basically trashing Bad Bunny. Well, his daughter Natalia started a career in modeling and, lo and behold, she landed a great, star-making and profitable gig: the leading lady the video for the Bad Bunny song “Callaita”! Damn, las vueltas que da la vida, compas. Did Rosario draw inspiration from this real life event? BTW, Pepo García later retracted from his comments and wrote that the callaito should be him. Calladito te ves mas bonito! 

How many Latino fathers and daughters can relate to this story? We guess many! 

Credit: Facebook. Corporacion Teatro de Bellas Artes

Reggaeton is a very controversial genre due to the explicit nature of some of the lyrics and the fact that it embodies some ideas of toxic masculinity and traditional gender roles that are frankly medieval (we hate to admit it!). So the plot might resonate with many families where parents are literally scratching their heads over the stuff that their kids listen too! 

But we gotta remember that what was controversial a few years ago is no big deal now! 

Credit: Giphy. @maudit

Yes, there was a time when Elvis’ hip thrusts were deemed as immoral, as un insulto a las buenas costumbres. 

And let’s give Bad Bunny a break: he is actually pretty socially and politically engaged. Maybe the dad in the play can like him a little bit?

Credit: Instagram. @badbunnypr

When things got candentes in the island around the resignation of the now former governor Ricardo Roselló, he even paused his music career to join the protests that attempted to make Roselló step down as his homophobic and sexist views were made public.

Bad Bunny wrote then in an Instagram post: “I am pausing my career. After [my concerts] my agenda was to fly back to Miami. But I’m canceling everything. I’m pausing my career because I don’t have the heart or mind to do music […] I’m going to Puerto Rico. I’m not going to turn my back on you. We have to continue taking the streets”. And well, his efforts alongside Residente and Ricky Martin, paid off. 

Here’s Why Bad Bunny Jumped On A Soundcloud Track To Help A Security Guard Launch His First Single

Entertainment

Here’s Why Bad Bunny Jumped On A Soundcloud Track To Help A Security Guard Launch His First Single

@urbanfloweb / Twitter / shootter_ledo / Instagram

San Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio, more commonly known as Bad Bunny, El Conejo Malo, is very familiar with the transformative effects of SoundCloud. Bad Bunny was bagging groceries at a supermarket when he gained a cult following on SoundCloud. Since then, he’s risen to international fame, with dozens of accolades under his belt. Last year, he won the Latin American Music Awards Artist of the Year award and Billboard awarded him the Top Latin Song of the year for “Te Bote.”

Bad Bunny’s style and attitude might seem odd to some, but that’s given him all the success in the world. Like a true saint, he has a history of prioritizing his people over fame and glory. Just last month, Bad Bunny canceled a European concert tour last minute to fly home to Puerto Rico and participate in the Ricky Renuncia protests.

For the last year, Bad Bunny has been secretly working with other SoundCloud traperos to help boost their career.

Credit: Nabru Records / YouTube

In a way, nothing has changed for Bad Bunny when it comes to what matters most to him. He’s prioritizing Boricuas and Latin trap, hanging out with his friends, and listening to SoundCloud. 

That’s how he discovered Jesús Antonio Dominguez Collazo, A.K.A. Shootter Ledo.

Credit: Nabru Records / YouTube

Ledo has a biology degree and just fools around with music on the side. Right now, he’s working as a security guard. It just so happened that Dominguez and Benito had a mutual friend in La Paciencia, a producer with ears in all the right places. Last fall, La Paciencia played “Subimos de Rango” for Bad Bunny, and the trapero couldn’t get enough of it. Apparently, Ledo and Omy de Oro had spent just a couple hours making the track before they posted it to SoundCloud.

Bad Bunny loved the song so much that he created some verses to add.

Credit: Nabru Records / YouTube

La Paciencia had given him a heads up that they wanted to share the track with Bad Bunny to see what he thought of the song as a single. Dominguez says he honestly hadn’t even thought of getting off SoundCloud and creating a track, let alone with El Conejo Malo, when he got the call that San Benito already was writing verses for the song. 

It’s no mistake that Bad Bunny is helping produce new artists.

Credit: shootter_ledo / Instagram

It seems that La Paciencia and Bad Bunny had set up the hotel room specifically to hear artists spit lines in person. When Dominguez first walked into the hotel room with Bad Bunny, he was nervous. Bad Bunny knew it, and afterward, asked him to come back the next morning to try again. For Bad Bunny, it felt like he was “forcing it.”

So Dominguez went back to his security guard night shift and went back the next morning with new verses.

Credit: Nabru Records / YouTube

He literally wrote new verses during his shift and nailed it. La Paciencia and Bad Bunny took him on and more. Bad Bunny is a featured artist on the single. “What that man did, no one does…,” Dominguez said. “The most popular artist in the world did a remix to someone else’s first song. And he didn’t even know me…. no tiene nombre lo que él hizo.”

The track’s cover art honors El Conejo Malo’s own letras.

Credit: @urbanfloweb / Twitter

It’s a full-circle moment when Bad Bunny gets to rap about his Gucci wallet and how, “Si quiero, me retiro feliz y contento.” He knows that he’s in his moment, and that if he were to die, they’d erect a monument of him (Me muero y me hacen un monumento / estoy en mi momento).

Now, Ledo is just waiting to see if Bad Bunny’s help with “Subimos de Rango” jump-starts his music career.

Credit: Nabru Records / YouTube

“I’m going to see what fruits this [single] brings,” he says thinking about what’s next. “I’m going to see who sticks, who wants to collaborate. Pero, yo estoy puesto pa’ zumbar canciones… and get to where I need to get to.”

You can watch the full music video, by Shootter Ledo and Omy de Oro, featuring Bad Bunny right here.

The video premiered just two days ago and already has 700,000 views. The most liked comment on YouTube translates, “Wow, Bad Bunny with the surprising theme and bringing back trap. Thank you Bad Bunny.”

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