Entertainment

We Know It’s Hard To Keep Up, So We Rounded Up The Best Celebrity Beef Of The Year For You

If there is something we can always count on from show biz, it’s stars fighting other stars. As 2019 comes to an end, we’re looking back at the year in celebrity beef. It can be hard to keep track of celebrities who hate each other and why, but this list of 2019 celeb feuds will keep you informed on the latest celebrity rivalries and disputes.

Kevin Fret’s Mom vs. Ozuna

Instagram @ozuna

After the Puerto Rican Trap artist Kevin Fret died, his mom accused Ozuna of being involved in the artist’s homicide. Ozuna filed a complaint with the FBI alleging that late queer trapero Kevin Fret was blackmailing the Aura singer over the video. Ozuna confirmed his appearance in the video through a statement released by his manager Vincente Saavedra, and said that he was underage in the video and that it was “an error from the past.”Ozuna was interrogated by the authorities, but according to the police, he was not implicated in any criminal activities. 

Maluma vs. J Balvin

@maluma

The two reggaeton giants have been surrounded by rivalry rumours for years, and they had further enforced them by never working or appearing together. This year, they fired shots at each other in their joint music video for the collab track ‘Qué pena’. In the slick new music video, Maluma and Balvin take turns imitating each others’ Instagram personas: Maluma shouts into his phone, “This is for the culture man! Para la cultura!” Meanwhile, Balvin smooches himself in the mirror and purrs, “Maluma, baby. Mamacita.” So I guess, the air is clear now. There’s no conflict between them anymore, all is good in the universe.

Anuel AA & Bad Bunny Vs. Maluma

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GAN-GA 👹 @bryanttmyers

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Anuel AA teased at a new song on his Instagram. He talked about the ice on his neck, his enemies and his squad, and went on to rap “Nunca flow Maluma, siempre real G.” Bad Bunny, on his part, is a fan of the line, and he took to twitter to share it.

Bryant Myers vs. Anuel AA

In an Insta Live in April, Bryant Myers challenged Anuel to a fight after the Real Hasta La Muerte brand porter insulted him in his single “Fulete.” “Pero, papi, tu no respetas a nadie, cabrón,” Myers responded.

Reggaetoneros vs. Grammy Latino

@nickyjam

Daddy Yankee, J Balvin, and a number of other famous Latin music artists announced their boycott of the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards due to whitewashing.The boycott was a response to the absence of Reggaeton musicians from the list of nominees for the show’s 10 primary award categories, despite the genre’s monumental rise to global popularity over the decade. 

Don Omar vs. Ozuna

instagram @donomar

Earlier this year, Don Omar took advantage of rumors that were swirling about a sex tape featuring Ozuna by launching some indirect homophobic slurs towards the Aura singer, who is a longtime rival. Don Omar’s initial comments on Tuesday inspired a backlash that even included Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan, as well as Bad Bunny. Yesterday, the rey de reggaeton posted a message on both Instagram and Twitter. “Lunch break? Any of you eat ?? Not me,” a reference to the anti-gay slur “pato.” Don Omar also shared a video of a duck humping a teddy bear in his Instagram stories; fans immediately identified both comments as homophobic references to Ozuna, since the Aura singer’s logo is also a teddy bear.

Hailey Bieber vs. Selena Gomez

instagram @selenagomez

Soon after Gomez’s song “Lose You To Love Me” first dropped, Baldwin posted the song “I’ll Kill You” by Summer Walker to her Instagram Story. Fans speculated that Hailey was throwing shade at Selena, but Baldwin quickly shot down the speculation and called it “BS.” 

Nicki Minaj Vs. Cardi B 

instagram @nickiminaj

While Cardi has been trying her best to move past her ongoing beef with Nicki Minaj, the “MEGATRON” rapper didn’t have a problem adding more fuel to the fire. After sharing went down between herself, Cardi, and the Migos back in 2017, Minaj went on to open up about her “authentic come-up,” saying she relied solely on her talent in order to make it in the industry.

“I still had to go through these things because of people like you who made a sport out of tearing down a young, black woman who’s done nothing but come in this game with an authentic come-up, writing raps, and doing what the f**kin’ was really necessary,” she said. “No Instagram, no reality shows, no sucking DJs’ d*cks.”

Bella Thorne vs. Whoopie Goldberg

instagram @bellathorne

After a hacker threatened to release her nude photos, Bella Thorne took matters into her own hands and released them herself. However, when The View spoke about the situation a few days later, Whoopi Goldberg didn’t seem to think the 21-year-old’s actions were quite as brave and strong as the others, who lauded her and shamed the hacker for trying to extort Bella Thorne.

“Listen, if you’re famous, I don’t care how old you are, you don’t take nude pictures of yourself.” Whoopi Goldberg said, seemingly blaming the actress for getting hacked.

But Bella Thorne was not about to take that sitting down. She took to her Instagram stories and first wrote a long note about how “displeased and saddened” she was by Whoopi Goldberg’s stance, before announcing she would be canceling her scheduled appearance on The View, because she didn’t feel like “being beaten down by a bunch of older women.”

Demi Lovato vs. Taylor Swift

instagram @demilovato

If there is one person who is tired of all the non-drama drama, it’s Demi herself, who took to Instagram on Monday morning to set the record straight once and for all. “Life’s too short for women not to support other women,” she wrote. “Especially when women release great music. Great job Taylor Swift.” She accompanied that peace treaty with a screenshot of her phone, showing her playing Taylor’s song “Cruel Summer” from her new album, “Lover,” calling it “a jam.” Swift later took to Instagram herself re-sharing Lovato’s message to her Instagram story and saying, “This is so awesome & put the biggest smile on my face.”

“Thank you Demi Lovato,” she added.

Khloe Kardashian vs. Jordyn Woods

Perhaps the biggest feud of the year kicked off back in February! That’s when it was revealed that Khloe Kardashian‘s boyfriend, NBA star Tristan Thompson, cheated on her (again), this time with someone very close to the family — sister Kylie Jenner’s best friend, Jordyn Woods. The affair ended not only Khloe’s romantic relationship with the father of her child , but effectively finished off Jordyn’s previously tight-knit relationship with the whole Kardashian-Jenner clan.

Princess Nokia vs. Kali Uchis

instagram @kaliuchis

The internet dug up the receipts pertaining to Nokia’s “Orange Blossom” song, a 2015 track that bears more than a passing resemblance to Kali Uchis’ 2013 “Honey Baby.” Nokia had previously deleted the “Orange Blossom” video entirely, but someone re-uploaded it with an alternative title if you want to catch the clip.

Lil Nas Is Performing His Super Hit “Old Town Road” At The Grammys Alongside BTS—The First Ever K-Pop Band To Be Invited On Stage

Entertainment

Lil Nas Is Performing His Super Hit “Old Town Road” At The Grammys Alongside BTS—The First Ever K-Pop Band To Be Invited On Stage

lilnasx / Instagram

BTS and Lil Nas definitely dominated the music scene in 2019. Radio stations couldn’t stop playing their music — and we couldn’t stop listening. And because we can’t decide who we love the most, The Recording Academy and CBS confirmed that the rapper and K-pop group will be performing together at this year’s Grammys.

BTS is going to perform at the Grammys!

The news was shared by the Recording Academy itself just a short time ago, and it’s even more exciting than an initial report that said only RM would be performing. 

Initially, fans thought that only one BTS member would be performing.

An initial report that said only RM would be performing. In a lengthy profile on Lil Nas X published yesterday by Variety, sources suggested that the BTS singer, producer and rapper would take part in an “Old Town Road” showing, but that hadn’t been confirmed by the Recording Academy. Now, the entire band has been included, which is much, much more thrilling for all involved, especially for BTS’s Army.

BTS will make history as the first K-pop group to perform at the Grammys.

While fans were hoping they’d attend the 2020 ceremony as nominees, this is still an incredible leap forward when it comes to Korean acts being considered by the American music industry.

Get ready for a K-country-hip-pop crossover.

This won’t be the first time all these genres mash up though. In July 2019, a remix of Nas’ “Old Town Road” was released that featured the Korean group’s rapper, RM, retitled “Seoul Town Road,” a mashup that’s likely to fit into their Grammys collaboration.

BTS and Lil Nas won’t be the only ones at the “Old Town” party.

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😉

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The Grammys have other eclectic guests slated to join in for the number as well. Country star Billy Ray Cyruswill, of course, reprise the duet part that took the tune into overdrive early in its chart life. Diplo’s also going to be on stage.

The EDM star did his own “Old Town Road” remix.

Diplo invited Lil Nas X onto his stage last May at the Stagecoach Festival for the young rapper’s first live appearance, so it’s only natural that Lil Nas would make the DJ and producer a part of his show. And lastly, to really mix it up back in the direction of country, young yodeler Mason Ramsey is also joining the chart-topping artists on stage.

With six nominations in total, including Album of the Year and Record of the Year, Lil Nas X is one of the artists with the most nominations.

Lil Nas is tied with the most nominations with Billie Eilish. The two are surpassed only by Lizzo, so it makes sense that he’d want to make his performance extra special by including all of the musicians that helped make his hit even more popular. 

The star-studded performance was planned to honor the song’s many remixes

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2020 🧞‍♂️🧞‍♂️🧞‍♂️

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The segment has been called “Old Town Road All-Stars,” and in it, we’ll see the six-time nominee deliver a thrilling show of his 19-week No. 1.

According to Forbes, inIncluding BTS in its telecast is sure to help the Grammys improve ratings.

The award show’s ratings have been slipping for years. An issue that many award ceremonies have faced over the past decade. Which is why adding the most popular and beloved band in the world is sure to get plenty of people to turn on their TVs who otherwise probably would not have.

BTS and Lil Nas will be joining an incredible lineup of previously-announced performers, such as Billie Eilish, Lizzo, Ariana Grande, Jonas Brothers, Camila Cabello, and many, many more. The Grammys will air live on CBS this Sunday, January 26 at 8 PM EST.

How ‘Guantanamera’ Sung By Celia Cruz Helped Me To Better Understand My Abuelo’s Exile From Cuba

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How ‘Guantanamera’ Sung By Celia Cruz Helped Me To Better Understand My Abuelo’s Exile From Cuba

credit: Cuban passport image belonging to writer's mother / Photograph provided by Alexandria Portée / Flower design by Canva.com

My mother was six when she fled to the United States from Cuba with my abuela and her two siblings. After reuniting with my abuelo who fought against Fidel Castro in the Bay of Pigs War, they moved to Chicago, where they built a life for themselves completely from scratch, still gripping tenderly onto the heritage and cultures that connected them to families and friends back at home. In their efforts to keep and sustain our family’s Cuban heritage, my abuelos and my mother taught me and my siblings to love and cherish the many different and beautiful contributions that their island country has given to the world: cuisine, cafecito, Bacardí, music, and José Marti.

Naturally, as any proud Cuban-American, I have benevolently held onto all of these as my own personal tokens from an island I have never visited or known. I’m quick to boast about each of them as if they were conjured up by my own mother’s hard work in the kitchen. Still, none have Cuba’s treasures have made me feel quite so intimately linked to my family’s first home like the beloved Cuban song “Guantanamera.”

Like my abuelos and my mother’s stories of Cuba, “Guantanamera” is a song that has grown and adapted through its journey. I have heard the story of my abuelos’ wedding day more than a hundred times; the tale of how my mother cried when kids at her school called my abuelo —a Bay of Pigs prisoner who singlehandedly saved hundreds of lives after being captured by Castro — a criminal; the account of my abuela wringing her hands as she debated enrolling her children in Operation Peter Pan and how she later boarded a cargo ship holding onto only her children and memories of her life to meet my abuelo in the United States. Each anecdote is the same but is always slightly altered in some way depending on the storyteller’s mood and time that I plead for their retelling. Some days they’re drawn out, told with prideful smiles, but often they’re said quickly with an ache to forget the portal of bittersweet memories my questions have sent them through. So similarly goes the many different versions of “Guantanamera.”

It is widely accepted that the original lyrics of the song, considered to be Cuba’s unofficial anthem, were romantic in nature, but over time, the song has been interpreted as a political ode. Brought from the rural regions of the island and to airwaves by Cuban radio host Joseíto Fernández in the 1920s, the song quickly caught on among fans. Fernández performed it regularly on his show and, in the tradition of most folk music, improvised and changed verses based on the week’s events. Some days he sang about politics, and other days he purred lyrics that harped about azucar and its rising costs. Still, the song’s opening lines and chorus, “Guantanamera, guajira Guantanamera / Guantanamera, guajira Guantanamera,” always remained the same.

Cuban composer Julián Orbón adapted the “official” lyrics to the song using verses from Cuban freedom fighter José Martí’s poetry collection “Versos Sencillos.” Orbón’s version, the one most commonly recorded by music artists, used Marti’s lines about a “sincere man” who was from “where the palm trees grow (Yo soy un hombre sincero/ De donde crece la palma).

This adaptation, combined with other lyrics from Martí’s poems that express compassion for Cuba’s poor, is ultimately what turned “Guantanamera” into the country’s most recognized patriotic anthem. In the U.S. and internationally, the song has been interpreted and adopted as a rally for peace (in 2004, for instance, the Swedish government flipped it into an offbeat rap song to promote recycling) and performed by a wide range of artists. In 1966, the Sandpipers did a version that became an international hit, and in the years that followed, singers like Jimmy Buffett, Pitbull and even the Fugees recorded their own editions. My personal favorite is the one sung by Cuban-born singer Celía Cruz on her album “Bravo” in 1967.

My Spanish has never quite allowed me to communicate with my abuelo in his native language fluently, but “Guantanamera” has let me do so.

Most conversations with my abuelo come with a melding of his so-so English and my mediocre Spanish. Together, we’re able to find a common ground that allows us to make each other laugh, exchange “te quiero mucho muchos” and grants me the ability to learn about the family and life he was forced to leave behind. In worse case scenarios, my abuela, a retired Spanish teacher, or my mother will intervene to translate. But when it comes to “Guantanamera,” abuelo and I have never needed assistance. Together, we’ve sung the song, our separately known variants, not always familiar with the lines each other sings but always well aware that in those moments they fill us with a deep love for each other and the versions of Cuba we both know.

Recently, during a visit with my abuelos, we sat together in their snug living room listening to Celía Cruz’s illustrious take of “Guantanamera” as her throaty voice sang over flute trills and drums. Old pictures of primos and tias looked down at us from the walls as we first listened carefully to the lyrics.

There’s no knowing what will prompt one of the Cubans in my family to break out into song. My most playful tía will chorus a line to tell stories; my brother does it at the dinner table even though he knows he’ll be told it’s rude, and my mother does it when she wants you to be in a better mood. Like them, my abuelos and I couldn’t help ourselves as Celía’s lively low-range voice started the chorus. Not against the charms of “Guantanamera.” Soon enough, abuela, abuelo and I were all singing the different Spanish versions of the song we hold dear.

Truthfully, if ever there was a moment that I thought I could burst from feeling so whole, it was sitting there in their living room, watching as the burden of my abuelo’s struggles of exile, always easy to decipher in his quietly distracted stares, seemed almost completely forgotten as he sang with pure delight.

“Guantanamera” is a song that has had a rhythmic presence in my life for as long as I can remember.

Like the smell of aftershave on my abuelo’s worn blue guayabera and the cheekiness of my abuela’s wily grin, I could make out that song anywhere, even despite the many versions it holds. Including the one I’ve heard my abuelo hum while brushing his teeth and the one my mother tries to keep in tune to while singing along to Cruz as she drives in the car. Like the different impressions of the song, Cuba is a country that has been strongly woven into our different narratives. Still, while my relationship and experience with Cuba will never tug on the strings of my heart with the same pang as it does on my abuelos or my mother, “Guantanamera” reminds me that the island is much more of a home than a foreign place that my family’s exile might try to make me believe.