Entertainment

Aristemo Will Soon Be Broadcast All Over The US Thanks To Univision Distributing This Gay Love Story

Telenovelas have long been typecasting all the stereotypes we’ve grown up to believe to be true, and then to unlearn all over again. We’ve met the seductress duplicitous female villain, the overreactive, drama queen female ‘lover,’ and the steel-jawed masculine heart-breaker hero who finally finds his integrity and reunites with his inhumanly patient lover. Oh, and all the woman are highly sexualized and overall just the most feminine. Telenovelas have long codified the binary and the love stories of heteros. Not anymore.

Televisa’s El corazón nunca se equivoca (ECNSE) premiered in Mexico earlier this summer, and, now that Univision is picking up the novela, the U.S. is about to get its first-ever gay couple to star in a novela. 

El corazón nunca se equivoca (ECNSE) is the spin-off of novela Mi marido tiene familia that we’ve all been waiting for. 

Credit: @M3li_G3 / Twitter

We got to meet stars Aristóteles “Aris” Córcega (Emilio Osorio) and Cuauhtémoc “Temo” López (Joaquín Bondoni) meet and fall in love in Mi marido tiene familia. That said, they met as teenagers while living under their parents’ ignorant roofs. Now we get to see them build their own lives. Together, the duo has been lovingly dubbed “Aristemo” or “Emiliaco,” depending who you ask.

In Mi marido tiene familia, we watched Aristemo endure a lot of homophobic hate.

Credit: @Itgetsbetter / Twitter

Being gay in a homophobic society is incredibly isolating and dangerous. Suicide rates are nearly twice as high in the LGBTQ+ community than in the hetero community. That’s not because they’re gay. It’s because people are told that “God hates fags.” Fans have been rooting for Aristemo ever since they graced the television screen because they offer hope to all the gay niños out there watching.

ECNSE will follow Aristemo as they move from Oaxaca to Mexico City to follow their passions.

Credit: @Dacaflow / Twitter

Of course, passion ensues. They escape Oaxaca’s brand of homophobia for Mexico City’s brand, but, as is the reality for our LGBTQ+ community, Aristemo finds and cultivates a safe space for them to love each other freely. Instead of sneaking around their parent’s houses, they hide away in their own shared apartment together, free at last.

Claro, leaving the crime scene of their families’ homophobia doesn’t heal those wounds as quickly as they hoped for.

Credit: @ARISTEM0KING / Twitter

You can expect to see a reasonable representation of life for LGBTQ+ youth in Mexico City. LGBT youth are far more likely to experience depression, suicidality and mental illness than hetero folks. Instead of the “happily ever after” ending we typically get from novelas, we get to see a more realistic next chapter in Aristemo’s lives together as they cope with their own depression, suicidal thoughts, and the emotional distress that homophobic political campaigns inflict. 

American fans are emocionada AF.

Credit: @httpTahi / Twitter

This fan took the time to screenshot grabs of an interview with Bondoni and Osorio, because the duo is just as cute off-screen as they are on-screen. “Ay pero bro, que bonito lo miras,” the fan captioned. “EMILIACO EN USA!”

We’re all learning lessons in love from Aristemo.

Credit: @SHIPPERARI / Twitter

Apparently, Aristemo not only goes on to create a safe space for themselves, but they also take in other LGBTQ+ youth. ????We’ll meet their new friends, Diego (Nikolás Caballero) and Carlota Cervantes (Ale Müller), and watch how this little family learns to take care of each other and unlearn the drama that their families created for them.

The broader Aristemo family diaspora is currently weeping pride tears everywhere.

Credit: @pride_site / Twitter

“I’m so proud and also very excited 🙂 can’t wait for aristemo to make history in the us,” tweets one fan. “Creo que sin importar lo que pase, nos sentimos muy orgullosos,” tweets another. No novela drama we’re about to witness will change how proud we are to finally give this love story the spotlight. Why? Because the heart is never wrong [cries in gay].

America, you can watch El corazón nunca se equivoca on August 13, 2019 at 9p.m., only on Univision.

Credit: @T53657190 / Twitter

It’s prep time, mi gente. Gather your friends, your micheladas and a few Costco sized bags of Fritos, because the emotional eating is about to take over your life. Plus, know that you have 26 episodes to binge, which in novela world, is simply not enough. Still, we’ll take it. Mil gracias, Univision.

READ: Univision Makes History, Announces First Telenovela That Will Star Gay Couple In Leading Role

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Things That Matter

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Cast of ‘Glee’ Along With Demi Lovato Paid Tribute to Naya Rivera At the GLAAD Awards

Entertainment

The Cast of ‘Glee’ Along With Demi Lovato Paid Tribute to Naya Rivera At the GLAAD Awards

Photo via Getty

On Thursday, the cast of “Glee” paid tribute to Naya Rivera at the GLAAD Media Awards. Rivera was a once-in-a-lifetime talent the touched so many lives personally and through the screen while she was alive. But perhaps none of Naya’s roles were as impactful as Santana Lopez was.

This year, GLAAD decided to take time to honor the impact Naya Rivera had on LGBTQ representation onscreen.

During a time when LGBTQ represenation onscreen was rare, Santana Lopez was groundbreaking for being both queer and Latina. Santana went from a shut-off closeted cheerleader to an out-and-proud lesbian woman. This was a story arc many queer kids had never seen before.

Demi Lovato introduced the cast of “Glee” with a touching speech. She described how honored she was (and still is) to have played Santana’s girlfriend, Dani, on the show.

“I don’t have to tell you that this year was a tough, tough year,” Lovato said. “A particular moment of heartbreak stands out for me: losing my friend Naya Rivera. I will always cherish the chance I got to play Naya’s girlfriend, Dani, on ‘Glee.’”

“The character Naya played, Santana Lopez, was groundbreaking for closeted queer girls — like I was at the time,” she went on. “And her ambition and accomplishments inspired Latina women all over the world.”

Then, dozens of former “Glee” cast members gathered via Zoom to pay tribute to Naya Rivera.

The tribute featured former “Glee” actors like Darren Criss, Jane Lynch, Matthew Morrison, Amber Riley, Heather Morris, Harry Shum Jr., Jenna Ushkowitz, Chris Colfer, and Kevin McHale. There were also many others.

“Naya would be honored to receive this recognition,” read the statement. “When Naya was told that Santana would be a lesbian she called me to let me know and I asked her how did she feel about that and she said ‘I feel great about it!'”

“This year marks the tenth anniversary that Naya’s character, Santana Lopez, came out on ‘Glee’,” said Dot-Marie Jones, who played Coach Beast on the Fox series.

“Santana basically got disowned by her family. And as alot of us know, that’s a feeling too many LGBTQ kids know too well,” continued Chris Colfer, who played Kurt Hummel.

The loving tribute then ended with a written statement from Naya Rivera’s mother Yolanda Previtire, who couldn’t make it to the call.

“Little did we know that she would impact so many people in the LGBTQ community. Her desire was to always be an advocate to those who did not have a voice.

“She continued: “I don’t believe that she realized how important she was to this world. I am grateful that my eldest daughter helped to change the landscape of how we view and see each other.”

“Her desire was to always be an advocate to those who did not have a voice,” the message read, in part. “I don’t believe that she realized how important she was to this world. I am grateful that my eldest daughter helped to change the landscape of how we view and see each other.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com