Entertainment

Amazon Prime’s New TV Show Is Showing The Zombie Apocalypse From The Perspective Of Narcos

Amazon has officially become home to post-apocalyptic horror series “Narcos vs Zombies,” which will be entirely created, written, and produced in Mexico. The action-drama series will even star actors from “Narcos: Mexico,” and will showcase the resiliency of narco-culture long after zombies have taken over the planet. The drama will unfold at the U.S.-Mexico border after the U.S. military performs shady experiments on its wounded soldiers, who become the original source of a booming zombie population. Soon, Mexican SWAT teams fall victim to the zombie virus and the U.S. Army dedicates its attention to eradicating the zombified SWAT team across the border.

The Spanish-language series confirms what we all already know: Mexico deserves its own zombie apocalypse content, and Amazon Prime is making it happen in 2020.

We’ll witness the zombie apocalypse unfold through the lens of a Mexican drug lord.

CREDIT: @NALIP_ORG / TWITTER

Sergio Peris-Mencheta, known for his role in “Snowfall” and “Rambo: Last Blood,” will play the untouchable kingpin Alonso Marroquín, whose life changes forever during a prison escape. Accompanied by his son, Lucas, played by Nery Arredondo of “Vuelven,” Alonso breaks out of a high-security Mexican prison and goes into hiding on the U.S. side of the border. The dangerous father-son duo finds themselves taking shelter at a drug rehabilitation facility ironically called Paradiso, without knowing Zombie Apocalypse Ground Zero would develop not too far from there. 

The premise of the plot is only moderately scathing of U.S.-Mexico relations, and it starts with how the United States treats its wounded soldiers. The story goes that the U.S. decided to conduct military experiments on its wounded soldiers, in the hopes that it would turn them into killing machines. When the experiment fails, the U.S. Army leaves its soldiers for dead near the border. The experiment, of course, takes hold as the soldiers do become killing machines, but they won’t take orders from the U.S. Army.

As a Mexican SWAT team leads a search to find the escaped Marroquíns, they stumble upon the mutant zombie soldiers and fall prey to the zombie virus, leaving the Marroquíns in the middle of what will become a U.S.-Mexico zombie war.  “The series is a lot of fun, action-packed and features amazing VFX, but it will also likely ruffle some feathers as it deals with several important – and controversial – current affairs,” Nicolas Entel, series showrunner and founding partner of Red Creek Productions, said in a press release.

Creator of the Pablo Escobar documentary, “Sins of My Father,” Nicolas Entel will be the series showrunner.

CREDIT: @BUENASENFISH /TWITTER

“We are always looking to bring new kinds of premium content to our Prime members, therefore we are very excited about this new and innovative series that will surely be loved by fans of a variety of genres,” head of Amazon Prime Video’s Mexico Originals, Javier Szerman, told Variety, adding, “The story of ‘Narcos vs Zombies’ is something that hasn’t been done at this scale in Latin America.”

Argentine Nicolas Entel has been named the series’ showrunner, and given his success with “Pecados De Mi Padre” (“Sins of My Father”), “Narcos vs Zombies” is slated to be very well-received. “Pecados De Mi Padre” is a documentary about Colombian drug kingpin Pablo Escobar, as told through the lens of his only son, and the sons of Escobar’s most famous fatal victims. Acclaimed director Rigoberto Castañeda (“Diablero”, “Hasta Que Te Concocí”)  will bring the series to life and Miguel Tejada Flores (“Screamers”, “Beyond Re-Animator”) will write the series.

So far, Latino reception has been mixed.

CREDIT: @ROSE20143521415 / TWITTER

What kind of Televisa is this? First the Derbez series and then this. They are on a very good road @PrimeVideoMX. NOOOOOOOOOOT!” tweeted Alejandro Gómez (@AliasChiri). “Just what we need, another series of narcos,” added Mario Franco (@lccmariofranco).

The first season is expected to be eight, high-production-value episodes, and is produced by Dynamo (“Narcos” and “El Chapo”) and Red Creek Productions (“Sins of My Father”). The series will premiere to more than 200 countries worldwide, and is expected to rivet Latin-American audiences.

For all of us at Dynamo it has been an incredible experience to produce this unique original series for Prime Video in Latin America,” Andrés Calderón, CEO of Dynamo said in a press release. “The level of complexity in the production of this series added with the blending of genres will bring audiences a story which they have never before seen.”

READ: ‘Narcos: Mexico’ Is Back For A Second Season: Here’s Everything We Know So Far

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Mexican Politician Accused Of Rape Vows To Block Elections Unless He’s Allowed To Run

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Mexican Politician Accused Of Rape Vows To Block Elections Unless He’s Allowed To Run

It’s an election year in Mexico and that means that things are heating up as candidates fight for the top spot. At the same time, Mexico is experiencing a burgeoning fight for women’s rights that demands accountability and justice. Despite all the marches and protests and civil disobedience by hundreds of thousands of Mexicans, it remains to be seen how much change will happen and when. 

Case in point: Félix Salgado, a candidate for governor of Guerrero who has been accused of rape and sexual assault but maintains the support of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO). Now, after being disqualified from the race because of undisclosed campaign finances, the candidate is vowing to block any elections from taking place unless he is allowed to continue his campaign. 

A disqualified candidate is vowing to block elections unless he’s allowed to run.

Félix Salgado was running to be governor of the Mexican state of Guerrero when he was faced with allegations of rape and sexual assault. The commission that selects party candidates allowed him to remain in the race and he continues to maintain the support of President AMLO – who is of the same political party, Morena. 

However, in late March, election regulators ordered that Salgado be taken off the ballot due to a failure to report campaign spending, according to the AP. Mexico’s electoral court ordered the Federal Electoral Institute (FEI) to reconsider their decision last week. Salgado is already threatening to throw the election process into chaos.

“If we are on the ballot, there will be elections,” Salgado told supporters in Guerrero after leading a caravan of protestors to the FEI’s office in Mexico City on Sunday. “If we are not on the ballot, there will not be any elections,” Salgado said.

The AP notes that Salgado is not making an empty threat. Guerrero is an embattled state overrun with violence and drug gangs and many elections have been previously disrupted. Past governors have been forced out of office before finishing their terms. Salgado was previously filmed getting into a confrontation with police in 2000.

It was just weeks ago that the ruling party allowed Salgado’s candidacy to move forward.

In mid-March, Morena confirmed that Félix Salgado would be its candidate for governor in Guerrero after completing a new selection process in which the former senator was reportedly pitted against four women.

Morena polled citizens in Guerrero last weekend to determine levels of support for five different possible candidates, according to media reports. Among the four women who were included in the process were Acapulco Mayor Adela Román and Senator Nestora Salgado.

Félix Salgado was the clear winner of the survey, even coming out on top when those polled were asked to opine on the potential candidates’ respect for the rights of women. He also prevailed in all other categories including honesty and knowledge of the municipality in which the poll respondents lived.

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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