Entertainment

Alejandro Sanz Launched A Project To Help Support Dreamers And These Latino Celebrities Came Out To Help

Alejandro Sanz has landed in the U.S. to kick of his La Gira tour and with that he is creating a new movement in support of Dreamers – undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. at a young age and have lived their entire lives stateside. Many A-listers are getting behind La Tortura singer’s Dreamers initiative which can easily be supported by means of a t-shirt. Ricky Martin, Camila Cabello and J Balvin are a few of the Latino celebs who have shared selfies wearing the charitable and comfy-looking tops.

The all-black shirts come in an array of styles including the classic t-shirt style, long sleeves, sleeveless and racerback tank tops and are available to purchase for the budget-friendly price of $26.99. Each of the shirts features #Dreamers written across the front with the letter A written upside down and encircled.

Funds from the shirts will help the Ascend Educational Fund which provides funds for their education, the Dream Big Nevada DACA renewal fund and the Immigrants Rising’s that provides subsidies to undocumented entrepreneurs who work to create positive social change.

Luis Fonsi

The Puerto Rican singer shared a photo wearing the classic style tee. Next to it he wrote, “Every great dream begins with a DREAMER. Don’t let anyone threaten your dreams or make you feel like you don’t belong.”

Ricky Martin

Ricky Martin supported the Spanish singer by posting a selfie where he looks completely chill and relaxed. He wrote, “I’m joining my friend Alejandro on this great initiative to support the Dreamers in the US. Because #WeAllDream. We all belong. We are all one. And EVERYONE matters.”

Camila Cabello

The Señorita singer didn’t fall behind as she also supported Dreamers. On her stories Camila shared a selfie and wrote, “I’m joining my friend @alejandrosanz on the initiative to support the #Dreamers in the US!!!” She continued, “Because they are kids just like us just trying to do the best they can in this world.”

Ricardo Montaner

The Venezuelan-Argentine singer did his part and supported the cause with a snap that he captioned with, “Alejandro asked me to call your attention, in his name and those of #dreamers… I also join this beautiful campaign.”

J Balvin

Colombiano J Balvin didn’t hesitate in purchasing a t-shirt and a coffee to go. The Con Altura singer shared a stylish pic wearing an all-black ensemble and standing next to a food truck. “A good coffee and a good cause CharityStars.com/Alejandro #WeallDream.”

India Martinez

The Spanish singer took part in the movement with a pic showcasing her support (and her flawless skin!).

Paty Cantu

The Mexican singer shared a radiant, fresh-faced selfie simulating a polaroid. “I think, then exist. I dream, then live. All dreams are important. And we can do more than by supporting with words. We can support with actions,” she wrote.

Ana Lorena

The Mexican-American actress proudly supports Alejandro with a stunning photo she captioned with, “I like people that don’t just stand still in moments of unease or discomfort. I like the kind of people who actually do something for change. That’s why I’ve joined @alejandrosanz, the #DreamerTeam and the Dreamers in standing together to fight for this cause.” 

Alejandro Sanz

Of course, Alejandro himself also took to social media to share how he wears the charitable shirt by posting his own smiling pic. “I wear the t-shirt of dreams fulfilled, and you? #DREAMERS #DreamerTeam #WeAllDream”

From Nipsey Hussle To Jose Jose, This Year We Had To Say Goodbye To Many Icons—Here’s A Roundup Of Celebrities Lost In 2019

Entertainment

From Nipsey Hussle To Jose Jose, This Year We Had To Say Goodbye To Many Icons—Here’s A Roundup Of Celebrities Lost In 2019

Jose Jose / emilyhartridge / Nipsey Hussle / Instagram

With 2019 ending in just a couple weeks, we’re taking a look back at the stars we lost in 2019. Learning of the death of a childhood hero, or an icon you look up to is always a sad experience, and unfortunately, 2019 was a year when we had to say goodbye to too many of them. From political big-hitters, to rappers, reggaeton artists and dancers, many icons passed away this year, and all will be greatly missed. Here’s to them:

Jose Jose

The Mexican musical icon died this year after battling pancreatic cancer. “El Príncipe de la canción” (Prince of Song), had tweeted in June that he was undergoing therapy and thanked his fans for their support. He was known for romantic ballads like “La Nave del Olvido,” “40 y 20,” “Gavilán o Paloma” and “El Triste,” and many more songs that became hits throughout his career of more than half a century.

Shelley Morrison 

twitter @deanrichards

The actress best known as Rosario Salazar, Karen Walker’s maid and confidante on “Will & Grace” — died on Dec. 1 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles from heart failure following a brief illness, publicist Lori De Waal told People magazine. She was 83. “Shelley’s greatest pride as an actress was in playing the indomitable Rosario, in a comedy series that furthered the cause of social equity and fairness for LGBTQ people. 

Alicia Alonso 

twitter @luis81710730

Legendary Cuban ballerina Alicia Alonso passed on October 17 at the age of 98 in a hospital of La Habana. She was the first western dancer to perform in the Soviet Union in 1957. She was the Cuban government’s highest artistic figure. 

Edith Gonzales

twitter @olivercampox

The Telenovela star lost her battle with cancer at 54 on the 13th of June, after two years fighting against the disease. There was a public homage in honor of her at the Jorge Negrete Theater in Ciudad de Mexico.

Carolina Bittencourt 

instagram @fofocalisany

Brazilian model Bittencourt died in São Paulo at the end of April after she drowned in an attempt to rescue her dogs who fell out of the sailboat she was on with her husband, Jorge Sestini. She was 37.

Nipsey Hussle

twitter @1johnpapi

The rapper Nipsey Hussle died in April after a shooting in Los Angeles near a clothing store he owned.

Fabio Legarda

twitter @actualidadrt

The Colombian reggaetonero died on February 7 during a shooting in Medellin. The musician was in his car, where he received a shot to the head which caused severe damage. Fellow Colombian artists like Juanes, Maluma and J Balvin expressed their condolences for the loss of this young talent.

Fernando Gaitan

twitter @mrintruso

The writer and producer of the world’s most famous telenovela ‘Betty La Fea’ passed away at 58 years of age. His iconic telenovela is considered to be the most successful in the world. He also worked on the adaptation of Betty, for US audiences ‘Betty en Nueva York’, coming to Telemundo on February 4, 2020.

Silver King

twitter @milenio

Professional lucha libre wrestler and actor King died after collapsing from a heart attack during his performance in London on May 11, The Guardian reported.

Kevin Fret

twitter @reggaetonxgata

The Latin trap singer was murdered this January. He was the first openly gay trap singer and debuted in 2018 with his single “Soy Asi.”

Juice WRLD

twitter @marshmellomusic

The Chicago-born artist, whose real name was Jarad Anthony Higgins, died after reportedly having a seizure at Chicago’s Midway Airport. 

Sulli

twitter @ecpv1

The former member of the popular K-Pop girl group f(x) was found dead in her Sujeong-gu apartment on Oct. 14. She was 25. 

Carl Ruiz

@luis81710730

The beloved Food Network star died on Sept. 21 at 44. His official cause of death has not been announced but Ruiz’s family confirmed the sad news by creating the Twitter account, @wemisscarlruiz.

Emily Hartridge 

twitter @thepophub

The YouTube star died on July 12, at the age of 35, in an electric scooter collision. An announcement was made on her official Instagram account on Saturday.

Cameron Boyce 

twitter @misslu96

The star of the Disney Channel franchise Descendants and the television series Jessie died on July 6. He was 20.

Gabriel Diniz

twitter @jubzinha

Brazilian pop star Diniz died in a plane crash in Brazil in late May, his record label confirmed. He was 28 years old. The singer was reportedly flying from Salvador to his girlfriend Karoline Calheiros’s birthday party in Maceió on May 27 when the small plane he was a passenger on crashed in the town of Porto Do Mato, Estância, on the southern coast of Sergipe, Brazil.

Doris Day

twitter @peterkidder

Day, the beautiful blonde whose sunny screen presence and singing voice guaranteed box-office and record-chart hits in the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s, died on May 13, her rep confirmed. She was 97.

Max Azria 

twitter @thestyledeskco

Azria, founder of the iconic American fashion brand BCBGMAXAZRIA, died on May 6 in a Houston hospital, WWD reported. He was 70. According to the outlet, the legendary Tunisian-born designer died of lung cancer.

Here Are Ten Indigenous Organizations To Give Back To This Thanksgiving

Things That Matter

Here Are Ten Indigenous Organizations To Give Back To This Thanksgiving

Amazon Frontlines

Thanksgiving can feel like a rather loaded holiday, particularly if you are a part of (or are empathetic to) the Native American community. The revisionist retelling of what went on between American Indians and the Pilgrims who contributed to the ongoing occupation and genocide of the former can just leave a nasty taste in your mouth. Instead of accepting the American jingoist version of the holiday, many people have chosen to simply adopt the idea of expressing gratitude and convening with loved ones over food. 

It may be all the tryptophan from the turkey or being around friends and family, but the holiday seems to trigger a need to give to more vulnerable groups and there are fewer more vulnerable groups than indigenous people around the world. It’s not just in the United States, indigenous lives are globally marginalized and with that comes a great cost to humanity: their lives and our own. 

Indigenous communities are essential to combating climate change and when we allow those communities to be destroyed, we allow our planet to be destroyed. This Thanksgiving, let’s give back.

Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women USA

MMIW USA has a narrow scope, “to bring our missing home and help the families of the murdered cope and support them through the process of grief.” The organization provides guidance and resources to family members, who lack the support of the system, to deal with the impossible situation of having a missing loved one. The larger goal of MMIW USA is to eradicate the issue of Native American women encountering disproportionate levels of violence in the U.S. 

Donate now

Partnership With Native Americans 

According to PWNA, 90,000 American Indian families are homeless or under-housed. By serving 60 reservations across 12 states, PWNA centers “underserved and geographically isolated” communities in the Northern Plains and Southwest. The organization provides support by using programs and resources to address short-term and long-term community concerns like unemployment and housing. 

Donate now

Adopt a Native Elder Program

Don’t worry, they know the name sounds weird and they need to explain it. In the 1980s, during the Hopi-Navajo land dispute that displaced 10,000 Navajas, elders faced particularly severe hardships including a lack of food. Linda Myers and Grace Smith Yellowhammer started this organization by doing food runs for those elders. 

“When you adopt, you commit to providing your Elder with two sets of Rainbow Food Boxes annually. A.N.E. provides and delivers the food,” according to the Website. 

Donate now

The Native American Heritage Association 

NAHA serves two of the poorest counties in the country, the Crow Creek and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota, where eight out of 10 Native Americans living on the reservations are employed. Like many organizations, NAHA is committed to combating the pervasive hunger that has riddled indigenous communities for decades, along with basic necessities. 

Donate now

The American Indian College Fund 

The college fund provides Native Americans with the resources necessary to take up space in higher education and is the largest of its kind in the U.S. 

“For 30 years, the College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native student access to higher education. We provide scholarships, programming to improve Native American student access to higher education, and the support and tools for them to succeed once they are there,” according to the mission statement. 

Donate now

Native American Rights Fund 

NARF provides legal resources to tribes and American Indians who cannot afford adequate representation. Since 1971, the organization has defended and won major cases to support tribal sovereignty, treaty rights, natural resource protection, education, and more on behalf of American Indians.

Donate now. 

Inuit Tapirit Kanatami 

ITK provides research, advocacy and public outreach to protect and advance the rights of Inuit in Canada. This includes a comprehensive program including plans to combat climate change, an Inuit language journal, a National Inuit Youth Counsel, food-based initiatives, and suicide prevention efforts. 

Donate now

Indigenous Literacy Foundation 

“Only 36% of Indigenous Year 5 students in very remote areas are at or above national minimum reading standards, compared to 96% for non-Indigenous students in major cities,” according to the ILF website. 

The organization addresses illiteracy in 280 remote indigenous communities in Australia by providing books, literacy programs, and community literacy projects.

Donate now

Amazon Watch

Amazon Watch not only seeks to preserve the rainforest but it also serves to advance the rights and interests of indigenous communities in the Amazon Basin. Amazon Watch argues there is no protecting the Amazon without protecting the people who have called it home for centuries. 

“Amazon Watch promotes these indigenous-led solutions, such as green development and autonomous solar power, and expands capacity for indigenous leaders, especially women, to maintain their autonomy and sovereignty for the stewardship of their ancestral territories,” according to their mission statement. 

The project partners with these communities, along with environmental organizations to continue to fight for human rights, corporate accountability, and to reduce the harmful effects of climate change. 

Donate now

Amazon Frontlines

Much like Amazon Watch, Amazon Frontlines believes that the destruction of the Amazon is intrinsically linked to the destruction of indigenous communities. AF provides indigenous families with access to clean water and renewable energy, particularly the Kofan, Siona, Secoya, and Waorani who live downriver from Ecuador’s largest oil fields. However, a renewed interest in climate change and preventing the Amazon fires has allowed the organization to extend support to communities in Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil. 

Donate now.