Entertainment

Alejandro Sanz Launched A Project To Help Support Dreamers And These Latino Celebrities Came Out To Help

Alejandro Sanz has landed in the U.S. to kick of his La Gira tour and with that he is creating a new movement in support of Dreamers – undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. at a young age and have lived their entire lives stateside. Many A-listers are getting behind La Tortura singer’s Dreamers initiative which can easily be supported by means of a t-shirt. Ricky Martin, Camila Cabello and J Balvin are a few of the Latino celebs who have shared selfies wearing the charitable and comfy-looking tops.

The all-black shirts come in an array of styles including the classic t-shirt style, long sleeves, sleeveless and racerback tank tops and are available to purchase for the budget-friendly price of $26.99. Each of the shirts features #Dreamers written across the front with the letter A written upside down and encircled.

Funds from the shirts will help the Ascend Educational Fund which provides funds for their education, the Dream Big Nevada DACA renewal fund and the Immigrants Rising’s that provides subsidies to undocumented entrepreneurs who work to create positive social change.

Luis Fonsi

The Puerto Rican singer shared a photo wearing the classic style tee. Next to it he wrote, “Every great dream begins with a DREAMER. Don’t let anyone threaten your dreams or make you feel like you don’t belong.”

Ricky Martin

Ricky Martin supported the Spanish singer by posting a selfie where he looks completely chill and relaxed. He wrote, “I’m joining my friend Alejandro on this great initiative to support the Dreamers in the US. Because #WeAllDream. We all belong. We are all one. And EVERYONE matters.”

Camila Cabello

The Señorita singer didn’t fall behind as she also supported Dreamers. On her stories Camila shared a selfie and wrote, “I’m joining my friend @alejandrosanz on the initiative to support the #Dreamers in the US!!!” She continued, “Because they are kids just like us just trying to do the best they can in this world.”

Ricardo Montaner

The Venezuelan-Argentine singer did his part and supported the cause with a snap that he captioned with, “Alejandro asked me to call your attention, in his name and those of #dreamers… I also join this beautiful campaign.”

J Balvin

Colombiano J Balvin didn’t hesitate in purchasing a t-shirt and a coffee to go. The Con Altura singer shared a stylish pic wearing an all-black ensemble and standing next to a food truck. “A good coffee and a good cause CharityStars.com/Alejandro #WeallDream.”

India Martinez

The Spanish singer took part in the movement with a pic showcasing her support (and her flawless skin!).

Paty Cantu

The Mexican singer shared a radiant, fresh-faced selfie simulating a polaroid. “I think, then exist. I dream, then live. All dreams are important. And we can do more than by supporting with words. We can support with actions,” she wrote.

Ana Lorena

The Mexican-American actress proudly supports Alejandro with a stunning photo she captioned with, “I like people that don’t just stand still in moments of unease or discomfort. I like the kind of people who actually do something for change. That’s why I’ve joined @alejandrosanz, the #DreamerTeam and the Dreamers in standing together to fight for this cause.” 

Alejandro Sanz

Of course, Alejandro himself also took to social media to share how he wears the charitable shirt by posting his own smiling pic. “I wear the t-shirt of dreams fulfilled, and you? #DREAMERS #DreamerTeam #WeAllDream”

Hundreds Of Universities, Cities, And Businesses File Amicus Briefs Urging The Supreme Court To Defend DACA

Things That Matter

Hundreds Of Universities, Cities, And Businesses File Amicus Briefs Urging The Supreme Court To Defend DACA

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This week the Supreme Court went back into session, kicking off what’s expected to be one of the most divisive and controversial terms in recent history. Everything from LGBTQ and abortion rights, to yes, DACA, is on the docket, and America will get to see the impact of the addition of Trump-appointee Brett Kavanaugh.

Although judges are expected to be politically impartial, Kavanaugh’s contentious confirmation hearing after being accused of sexual assault, left him charging Democrats with unfairly going after his character.

Now, some experts are bracing for a possible “conservative revolution,” after the court overturned two precedents (a highly unusual move) last term, and President Donald Trump has successfully appointed 150 judges to lifetime seats on the bench (whoever told said your vote didn’t matter, lied.)

In its newly started session, the Supreme Court isn’t shying away from hot topic issues – including a decision that will decide the outcome of DACA once and for all.

President Donald Trump’s signature issue is immigration, and in November the court will consider his administration’s decision to phase out DACA, an Obama-era initiative that protects nearly 700,000 young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children from deportation. The eventual ruling will have a major impact on way or another in the presidential race.

At issue before the justices is not the legality of the program, but how the administration decided to phase it out.

Plaintiffs, including the University of California, a handful of states and DACA recipients argue that the phase out violated the Administrative Procedure Act, a federal law that governs how agencies can establish regulations. Lower courts agreed and issued nationwide injunctions that allowed renewals in the program to continue. The Trump administration appealed the decision to the Supreme Court, and at the time, the President predicted success: “We want to be in the Supreme Court on DACA,” he said.

Groups of all kinds are filing so-called Amicus briefs to the Suprme Court urging them to protect DACA.

More than 100 different cities from across the country, dozens of major colleges and universities, and some of the country’s largest companies all joined together to defend DACA.

The brief filed by some 165 educational institutions said: “These extraordinary young people should be cherished and celebrated, so that they can achieve their dreams and contribute to the fullest for our country. Banishing them once more to immigration limbo — a predicament they had no part in creating — is not merely cruel, but irrational.”

Even the Mexican government filed a brief with the court.

Mexico has had little legal recourse in it’s fight against Trump’s cruel and (as many consider) illegal policies targeting the migrant community. And a large part of the migrant community (including those attacked at the El Paso Massacre) are Mexican nationals. So the government has been eager to take a stand.

And with the upcoming legal battle regarding DACA, Mexico has staked its position in support of DREAMers by filing an Amicus brief with the court. The brief points out the commitment to human rights and the principles of dignity that should be afforded to all humans – regardless of their migration status.

Meanwhile, children advocates point out that eliminating the program would also harm more than a quarter million US-born children.

More than three dozen child advocacy organizations say White House officials failed to account for a quarter of a million children born in the U.S. whose parents are protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program when they repealed it in 2017.

“These children are endangered not only by the actual detention and deportation of their parents, but also the looming fear of deportation,” the groups wrote in an amicus brief filed with the Supreme Court last week. “The imminent threat of losing DACA protection places children at risk of losing parental nurturance, as well as losing income, food security, housing, access to health care, educational opportunities, and the sense of safety and security that is the foundation of healthy child development.”

Children’s health experts have been sounding the alarm on the impact of toxic stress inflicted on children impacted by the Trump administration’s immigration agenda. Studies have linked toxic stress to developmental issues with children’s brains and bodies and an increase in their risk of disorders ranging from diabetes to depression, heart disease, cancer, addiction and premature death.

DACA was created by an Obama executive order in 2012, and the Trump Administration announced in September 2017 it was officially ending the program.

When the Trump administration officially announced the end of the DACA program in September 2017, there were nearly 800,000 young immigrants around the country who benefited from it.

Three lawsuits challenging the termination of DACA filed in California, the District of Columbia and New York eventually led to courts prohibiting the government from phasing out the immigration program. Those lawsuits argued that ending the DACA program violated the rights of those covered by its benefits and ran counter to a federal law governing administrative agencies, according to SCOTUSblog. The Supreme Court consolidated those three lawsuits and will hear arguments on the DACA case on Nov. 12.

The justices will consider whether the court even has the authority to review the Trump administration’s decision to end DACA and, if so, whether the decision to end DACA is legal.

Predictably, President Trump has urged the court to strike down DACA.

As recently as Wednesday, President Trump said his predecessor had no authority to initiate the DACA program in the first place, and that if the Supreme Court overturns it, as it should, Congress would likely find a legislative solution to allowing DACA recipients to remain in the U.S.

“The Republicans and Democrats will have a DEAL to let them stay in our Country, in very short order,” he tweeted Wednesday. “It would actually benefit DACA, and be done the right way!”

Rapper 21 Savage Knows The Trauma Of Growing Up Undocumented, Now He Has A Plan To Help Kids Like Him

Entertainment

Rapper 21 Savage Knows The Trauma Of Growing Up Undocumented, Now He Has A Plan To Help Kids Like Him

21Savage / Instagram

Grammy-nominated rapper 21 Savage wants a better future for undocumented children living in the United States illegally. His answer? To grant U.S. citizenship automatically to all children living without documentation. Savage himself grew up without documentation and experienced the chronic fear that undocumented children often carry into adulthood firsthand.

The artist was born in London, England, to Dominican and Haitian parents and moved to the U.S. when he was just 7 years old.

@21savage / Instagram

His visa expired in 2006, but his lawyer said it wasn’t his fault. He was just 14 years old when he suddenly experienced the loss of freedom that the visa had granted. “When you’re a child, you don’t know what’s going on,” the rapper told AP News. “Now, you grow up and got to figure it out. Can’t get a job. Can’t get a license. I’m one of the lucky ones who became successful. It’s a lot of people who can’t.”

A decision that was out of his control followed him into adulthood, landing him in an ICE detention facility for ten days.

@21savage / Instagram

In 2017, 21 Savage applied to have his visa renewed without resolution. Earlier this year, ICE pulled over the young artist’s vehicle, arrested him, and detained him for ten days in a Georgia facility. Then, a spokesperson for ICE attempted to defame his character, saying, “His whole public persona is false. He actually came to the U.S. from the U.K. as a teen and overstayed his visa.” That simply isn’t true. He was just 7 years old –a baby– when he arrived in the U.S.

Now, he says the visa process is so overwhelming that undocumented people avoid even applying because it “hangs over your head forever.”

Now Savage is using his platform to speak on his experience as an undocumented child.

@21savage / Instagram

“When you ain’t got no choice, you should be exempt,” 21 Savage told AP. “It’s not like I was 30, woke up and moved over here. I’ve been here since I was like 7 or 8, probably younger than that. I didn’t know anything about visas and all that. I just knew we were moving to a new place.”  

Savage believes that granting automatic citizenship will even the playing field for hope for a better life with every other documented child.

@21savage / Instagram

“They just lose hope,” Savage told AP. “I feel like kids who were brought here at young ages, they should automatically be like ‘Yeah, you good to stay here, work and go to college.’ It should be nipped in the bud before it gets to a point before you come of age.” There are an estimated 1.1 million undocumented minors currently living in the United States. As they become of age, they watch their peers obtain legal jobs under healthy working conditions, obtain a driver’s license and go to college. Education access is a huge roadblock for undocumented youth, with 40% of undocumented adults under 24 reporting that they did not complete high school. 

For all the fiscal conservatives out there, granting citizenship to undocumented youth would likely only improve the economy.

@unitedwedream / Twitter

According to University of Washington Professor of Sociology Roberto Gonzalez,  “Given the opportunity to receive additional education and move into better-paying jobs, undocumented students would pay more in taxes and have more money to spend and invest in the U.S. economy.” Access to education begins with citizenship. Undocumented youth are not eligible for merit scholarships, FAFSA or Pell grants are only available to U.S. citizens. One Colorado non-profit, Together Colorado, predicts that an increase of $2.2 billion in tax revenue would result from “full immigration reform” that would allow undocumented youth to be granted equal participation in creating their own ceiling.

The National Immigration Law Center is awarding 21 Savage for his immigration activism efforts.

@21savage / Instagram

Savage fell into the school to prison pipeline early on in life. His brother, born in the U.S., was killed in a shooting. In seventh grade, Savage was personally banned from every public school in his county for gun possession. He was sent to a youth detention center, and when he got out, he joined a gang affiliated with The Bloods. Still, he was able to make a career for himself in the music industry, and experience class mobility, unlike most other undocumented children. His immigration court date has been postponed indefinitely. That makes his story a win. 

“We got a fight that we need to continue in this country,” Savage said. “It ain’t over yet. Even after everything is cool with me, we still have to fight and help people who can’t fight for themselves.” Share if you agree.