Entertainment

Twitter Is Asking Why Cardi black and Can Say The N-Word, She’s Got Some Thoughts

Last week, Gina Rodriguez rightfully received public backlash for saying the N-word on multiple occasions because she is not a black person, but the discourse seems to have spilled over to Cardi B (who is a black person) for her use of the N-word. Many people cannot conceive of the fact that some Latinxs are black and some of them are not. So many questions can be answered by visiting the public library or utilizing those Twitter fingers to do some online research, yet many of the loudest folks on the internet have a tenuous grasp or race and identity. 

Cardi B is accused of not being black again.

Cardi B was accused of not being black and saying the N-word. An issue that has been ongoing in her career as she has constantly asserted that she is Black and Latinx.  In February 2018 the “Bodak Yellow” sat down for a Teen Vogue interview with Zendaya, where she talked about the public’s confusion about her race and cultures. 

“One thing that always bothers me is that people know so little about my culture. We are Caribbean people. And a lot of people be attacking me because they feel like I don’t be saying that I’m black.” she told Zendaya. “Some people want to decide if you’re black or not, depending on your skin complexion, because they don’t understand Caribbean people or our culture. I don’t got to tell you that I’m black. I expect you to know it.”

Afro-Latinxs are constantly told they’re not black or Latinx enough. Love and Hip Hop Miami star Amara La Negra, an Afro-Latinx with dark skin and an Afro has had to defend her dual identity in the past as well. 

Cardi B defends her blackness once again.

When accused of not acting black she asked, “How do you act like a black woman? How do black women act?” 

Cardi B then shared a video defending her blackness yet again.

Cardi then shared a video from two years ago where she talked about how black publications have taught her about blackness and learning to love her natural hair. Other supporters noted that the reason why everyone is confused is because Latinx and black history is simply not taught well if at all in schools. 

“The majority of African captives were enslaved in Latin America & the Caribbean. folks don’t know these histories. the real question is how come? why do American educational institutions (k-12) do such a piss poor job teaching about race, slavery, settlement, and colonialism?” One Twitter user wrote.

Afro-Latinxs exist. Some Latinxs are black people. Say it again. Say it again. 

Cardi B is of Dominican and Trinidadian descent. These are two Caribbean nations with large black populations who are descendants of enslaved Africans. Nicki Minaj is also from Trinidad and Tobago and has a similar skin tone to Cardi B, yet her blackness is never called into question. 

Caribbeans, like many ethnicities that are colonial products, can be born in a spectrum of skin tones and features. Some of us are born black. Being black is a beautiful thing, but the social experience of a Latinx who looks like Celia Cruz is much different than one who looks like Gina Rodriguez. Afro-Latinxs have to navigate anti-black policies and anti-Latinx policies in ways that lighter-skinned Latinxs do not.

According to Pew Research, 1 in 4 Latinxs identify as Afro-Latinx and Latino Carribeans are more likely to identify as such.

“The multiple dimensions of Hispanic identity also reflect the long colonial history of Latin America, during which mixing occurred among indigenous Americans, white Europeans, slaves from Africa and Asians. In Latin America’s colonial period, about 15 times as many African slaves were taken to Spanish and Portuguese colonies than to the U.S. Today, about 130 million people of African descent live in Latin America.” 

The Afro-Latinx identity acknowledges the treatment of black Latinxs in the social construct of race relations, without erasing our Latinx heritage so that we no longer have to “choose” which fits best.

Can Latinxs say the N-word? 

Anyone who is a non-black person of color does not get a right to say the N-word. That includes non-black Latinxs. Having a small percentage of African ancestry does not make you a black person, it only means that your ancestors were black. 

To quote Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, “My identity is the descendant of many different identities. I am the descendant of African slaves. I am the descendant of Indigenous people. I am the descendant of Spanish colonizers… I am a descendant of all sorts of folks. That doesn’t mean I’m Black, that doesn’t mean I’m Native, but I can tell the story of my ancestors.”

If you would not be called the N-word by a racist then you do not get to reclaim it, period.  

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Cardi B and Mariah Carey Teamed Up to Talk About Confidence, Insecurity, and Prejudice in the Music Industry

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Cardi B and Mariah Carey Teamed Up to Talk About Confidence, Insecurity, and Prejudice in the Music Industry

Photos via Getty Images

At first glance, you may not think Cardi B and Mariah Carey have much in common. But the two chart-topping divas might actually be more similar than they are different.

Cardi B once called herself the “strip-club Mariah Carey”, so Interview magazine recruited the Afro-Venezuelan songstress herself to interview Belcalis.

In a new conversation in Interview magazine, Cardi B and Mariah Carey teamed up to talk about the challenges they’ve had to face as famous women of color coming from tough backgrounds.

And in case you thought otherwise, Mariah Carey was not throwing any softballs. The conversation was intense. The women covered everything from confidence, to body image, to prejudice in the music industry. It didn’t seem like either of the women held back.

Mimi opened the interview by asking Cardi if she ever felt beautiful as a child. Surprisingly, Cardi responded opened up about a topic that society doesn’t take about very often: anti-Blackness in the Latino community.

“I’m Trini and I’m Dominican, there’s a lot of Dominicans that look a certain type of way [in the Bronx]. They have soft, pretty, curly hair. Growing up, guys would ask me weird questions like, ‘If you’re Dominican, why is your hair so nappy?'”

Cardi went on to admit that she bleached and permed her hair when she was young to the point where she damaged her hair. But she soon learned to take care of her natural hair and appreciate it for what it was.

Cardi’s confession about her hair prompted Mariah to reveal her own vulnerable story. “It was a very traumatizing thing for me having a black father and a white mother, because my mother, who raised me, didn’t really know about textured hair,” Mariah said.

The superstar duo also touched on the sensitive topics of racism and prejudice in the music and fashion industries.

In fact, MC point-blank asked Cardi B: “Do you feel that the record industry or the fashion industry, from your perspective, is inherently racist?”. Cardi explained that she wouldn’t technically use the word racist, but has “felt prejudice.”

“I have been involved in endorsement deals, and then I found out that certain white people got more money for their deals from the same company,” she said. “So it’s like, ‘When you’re not paying me what you’re paying these other people, why is that?’ It’s kind of insulting.”

Cardi also added that Black artists have a tougher time getting dressed by designers and getting seats at fashion shows, even though hip-hop culture influences fashion in so many ways.

Cardi B and Mariah Carey then bonded over the fact that both of them could only be themselves throughout their careers in the public eye.

Mariah applauded the fact that the public doesn’t require celebrities to have a squeaky-clean image anymore. “I do think people are much more accepting now,” she said. “…I do feel like people are, at least in some circles, allowed to be themselves and express themselves more than they were back in the day.”

“People expected me to be something specific, but I can only be me,” she added. “We’re similar in that way.”

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Cardi B Goes On Jimmy Fallon And Talks About A Poop Issue So Many Of Us Can Relate To

Entertainment

Cardi B Goes On Jimmy Fallon And Talks About A Poop Issue So Many Of Us Can Relate To

It’s not too often that the lyrics of a Cardi B song are highly ambiguous or leave you wondering what she’s talking about. I mean take the lyrics for her song “WAP” with Megan Thee Stallion, we all know what they’re talking about there.

But the lyrics to her song “Up” are a bit less transparent and more open to interpretation. So, during a recent guest appearance on The Tonight Show, she explained to Jimmy Fallon the actual meaning behind the lyrics and although they also have to do with the body, it’s quite a different angle for the “Bodak Yellow” rapper.

Cardi B explained to Jimmy Fallon the meaning behind the lyrics for her song “Up.”

Cardi B left Jimmy Fallon lost for words after explaining the unexpected meaning behind a line in her new single “Up,” as she revealed one part of the song originally referred to an uncomfortable constipation situation. The line in question, which she had borrowed from her husband Offset, is: “If it’s up, then it’s stuck.”

Cardi admitted she initially thought it was a “Georgia thing” as Offset, who is from the state, says it “a lot”, but she soon learned fans from other Southern U.S. states are also familiar with the phrase, so she was inspired to use it too. She said, “After the song came out, I thought it was a Georgia thing, but then people were like, ‘We say that in New Orleans,’ ‘We say that in Florida.’ I’m like, ‘OK, man, listen. I guess, whatever.” 

During the exchange with Fallon, Cardi added: “Um, so have you ever taken a poop, right, and it don’t come out?” “It’s just up and it’s stuck. Yeah,” she shared. After an awkward silence, Fallon uttered, “Wow,” while Cardi simply nodded.

Fallon tried to look for other meanings in the ambiguous lyrics.

A stunned Fallon then offered his own take, suggesting the phrase could be about reaching a certain level of success and then maintaining it.

Cardi followed up, “It’s a metaphorical quote,” suggesting that achievement and constipation are just two of many possible interpretations of the song and that poop probably wasn’t actually on Cardi’s mind when she wrote the tune.

The pair also had fun during the show’s Mimic Challenge segment.

She is always one of the best guests on these shows. It makes them so much more fun to watch.

Meanwhile, get a look at the video for her song “Up” below.

And tell us what you think of the lyrics!

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