Entertainment

The Story Of José José’s Death Has More Twists And Turns Than A Telenovela, Here’s Everything You Need To Know

One of Mexico’s greatest icons continues to inspire people with tributes and ceremonies around the world. The death of José José sent much of Latin America into a deep mourning but now those same communities are celebrating the late-singer’s monumental legacy. 

And all of this celebration and remembrance comes shortly after an intense family drama fit for a telenovela. I mean, his body actually went missing. Like it doesn’t get more telenovela than that. But, at last, his body has been located, his family seems to have set aside their differences, and the world is coming together to remember the ‘Prince of Song.’ 

His public funeral was held in Miami and attended by his family, celebs, and fans from around the world. 

The public funeral was held at the Miami Dade Country Auditorium. Yes, José José was a Mexican legend but he inspired his fans from across Latin America and so, the crowd at the public funeral featured people from all walks of life and from Mexico, Colombia, Argentina, and Puerto Rico, among others.

It was a closed casket memorial. On Tuesday, it was revealed that José José’s body was not in the casket during the memorial, as it was still at the morgue.

Fans came out to celebrate the legacy of a man who had been singing since the 1970s, when he rose to fame with his first hit, “El Triste”.

Always dressed elegantly, the gifted singer was a combination of baritone and lyric tenor and revered for his ability to sustain long notes. The Latin American cultural icon, who was known for moving audiences to tears with melancholic love ballads, told fans in 2017 that he was battling pancreatic cancer.

Fans in Miami weren’t the only ones celebrating the legacy of the Mexican great.

Hundreds of people gathered Friday at one of Mexico City’s most famous parks, Alameda Central, to pay homage to the late singer. Fans were seen singing José José’s most famous songs. Some even dressed up as the singer.

As drama between the family spiraled out of control back in the US, many Mexicans worried that there may not be a proper memorial service in Mexico.

The death of José José hit hard in Mexico, which endured the 2016 death of another cherished crooner from the same era: Juan Gabriel.

And all of this played out just days after a seemingly broken family came together to celebrate the pop icon.

The drama started just days after the singer’s death when two siblings, José Joel and Marysol, accused their half-sister, Sarita, of hiding their father’s body.

The relationship between the two oldest siblings and José José’s youngest – Sarita Sosa – has been strained, particularly since the late crooner’s announcement in 2017 that he was suffering from pancreatic cancer, which prompted Sarita to move to Miami, drawing accusations of trying to profit from his legacy.

“We have every right to see my dad,” Marysol said to TV Azteca. “My half sister has a lot to explain to me and to all of Mexico. “Please, wherever you are, get in touch with us. I’ve been talking to you all day and I’m here, and I’ve been telling you since yesterday: I see my dad’s body, or I don’t believe anything.”

Whatever differences these siblings once shared seemed to have blown over in the wake of their father’s memorial services.

And it looks like the drama continues, as the family decides what to do with the singer’s remains.

The posthumous homecoming ceremony for José José in his native Mexico is caught up in a family conflict over the singer’s remains that are still in Miami, where he lived for decades.

José Joel Sosa said on Monday that he and his sister halted their father’s cremation because they wanted the entire body for the Mexico City memorial service. His other daughter in Miami, Sarita Sosa, said José José wanted half of his ashes to stay in Florida and the other to go to Mexico.

However, as of Wednesday, news reports indicated that the late-singer had already been cremated and half of his ashes would likely arrive in Mexico later in the day.

Telemundo reports that José José’s ashes will be divided among his three children – Marysol and José Joel from his second marriage to Ana Elena Noreña and Sarita from his third to Sara Salazar.

José José will be honored in a special memorial in Mexico City on Wednesday, where a portion of his ashes will be displayed for his fans and family to pay tribute.

It’s been an uphill battle for Marysol and José Joel, who tried to prevent their father’s cremation. The brother and sister wanted the singer’s body to be present for the Mexican memorial service and to be laid to rest in his native country. José Joel even pleaded to his late father’s wife, Salazar, and his step-sister a day before the cremation during an interview with Univision to stop the process and let his body rest in Mexico.

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You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Culture

You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Tacovid: SaborViral / Facebook

Pandemia. Brote. Vacuna. La Peste. Although you may find these terms in a glossary about the Covid-19 outbreak, that’s not what these words actually refer to. Instead, they’re options on the menu at a Mexican taqueria called “Tacovid: Sabor Viral”, a perhaps surprisingly very successful Coronavirus-themed restaurant.

Although to many having a Covid-themed taqueria may seem morbid or disrespectful or perhaps gross – I mean who wants to order a plague taco? – the taqueria is making light of a very serious situation with humor. Something that several other businesses have done since the pandemic began.

”Tacovid: Sabor Viral” is the Mexican taqueria going viral – pun intended – for its Covid-themed menu.

Ok…virus-themed tacos don’t exactly sound appetizing. Especially, as we’re still in the midst of a very real pandemic. But one 23-year-old man in the Mexican city of León, who was forced to close down his dance studio because of Coronavirus, is counting on a Covid-themed restaurant – and so far he’s been surprised by its success.

Brandon Velázquez converted his dance academy into a taquería at the end of July, and given that Mexico and the rest of the world was – and is – in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic decided to call it Tacovid Sabor Viral.

“I had to close my dance academy during the pandemic [but] then an opportunity arose to return to the same place, however, people still did not go out for fear of getting infected.” he told the newspaper El Universal.

“I had always wanted to open a taqueria and, at the end of July, the opportunity to do so occurred. It was how I took advantage of the moment to create this business with a coronavirus theme,” he added.

Items on the menu are named after – you guessed it – the Coronavirus and don’t sound like anything you’d willfully choose to order.

The young entrepreneur detailed the name of each dish, taking full advantage of the Coronavirus theme.

“We have around 12 different dishes, among them are the ‘Tacovid’; we have ‘Forty’, ‘Quesanitizing’, ‘Pandemic’, ‘Outbreak’, and many others. The price varies depending on the dish you order,” he told El Universal.

In addition to themed dishes, the servers also fit the Coronavirus-theme.

When the pandemic hit Mexico, the government urged Mexicans to observe “su sana distancia” and the now common mascot – Susana Distancia – was born.

“In the restaurant, a waitress dressed as a nurse with the name of ‘Susana’ takes orders and works the tables, referring to the healthy distance campaign that was implemented as a precautionary measure,” he says.

To his surprise – and honestly mine as well – the taqueria has been very successful.

Brandon told El Universal that he’s been pleasantly surprised by the support he has received from customers. “I’m surprised because we have had really good sales, despite the circumstances, we have had a lot of support by the community and we’ve already expanded to have two locations.”

“Customers are funny about the theme we are using in the business, and they are delighted with the dishes we are offering. They enjoy it and have a good time,” added Brandon.

Things are looking so good for Brandon and his Covid-themed taqueria, that he’s looking to expand the food business and add new dishes to the menu. “There is always the idea of new names for other dishes that we want to include in the menu.”

Brandon also said that he’s looking to build out a business model so the restaurant could expand to other parts of the country as a franchise.

Apparently, people are really into Covid-themed foods, as this isn’t the first place that a shop as cashed in on the pandemic. Back in April, a panadería was selling out of Covid-themed baked goods so quickly, they couldn’t keep the shelves stocked.

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Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Culture

Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Carlos Vivas / Getty Images

It is Mexico’s Independence Day and that means that Mexicans around the world are honoring their roots. Twitter is buzzing with people who might not be in Mexico but they will forever have Mexico in their hearts. Here are just a few of the loving messages from people who are Mexican through and through.

Viva Mexico is trending on social media and the tweets are filled with love and passion for the country.

Mexico received its independence from Spain on September 16, 1810 and since then the day has been marked with celebration. The day is marked with parties of pride and culture no matter where you are in the world.

Mexicans everywhere are letting their Mexican flag fly.

Tbh, who doesn’t want to be Mexican to enjoy the day of puro pinche pride? The celebration for Mexican Independence Day starts on Sept. 15 with El Grito. The tradition is that the president of Mexico stands on the balcony on Sept. 15 at 11 p.m. and rings the same church bell that Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang in 1810 to trigger the Mexican Revolution.

People are loving all of the celebrations for their homeland.

The original El Grito took place in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato in 1810. While most El Grito celebrations take place at the National Palace, some presidents, especially on their last year, celebrate El Grito in the town where it originated.

Honestly, no one celebrates their independence day like Mexico and we love them for it.

¡Viva Mexico! Mexico lindo y querido. How are you celebrating the Mexican Independence Day this year? Show us what you have planned.

READ: Many Mexicans Are Calling Out Fragile Masculinity As Some Continue To Protest A Controversial Zapata Painting

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