Entertainment

The Story Of José José’s Death Has More Twists And Turns Than A Telenovela, Here’s Everything You Need To Know

One of Mexico’s greatest icons continues to inspire people with tributes and ceremonies around the world. The death of José José sent much of Latin America into a deep mourning but now those same communities are celebrating the late-singer’s monumental legacy. 

And all of this celebration and remembrance comes shortly after an intense family drama fit for a telenovela. I mean, his body actually went missing. Like it doesn’t get more telenovela than that. But, at last, his body has been located, his family seems to have set aside their differences, and the world is coming together to remember the ‘Prince of Song.’ 

His public funeral was held in Miami and attended by his family, celebs, and fans from around the world. 

The public funeral was held at the Miami Dade Country Auditorium. Yes, José José was a Mexican legend but he inspired his fans from across Latin America and so, the crowd at the public funeral featured people from all walks of life and from Mexico, Colombia, Argentina, and Puerto Rico, among others.

It was a closed casket memorial. On Tuesday, it was revealed that José José’s body was not in the casket during the memorial, as it was still at the morgue.

Fans came out to celebrate the legacy of a man who had been singing since the 1970s, when he rose to fame with his first hit, “El Triste”.

Always dressed elegantly, the gifted singer was a combination of baritone and lyric tenor and revered for his ability to sustain long notes. The Latin American cultural icon, who was known for moving audiences to tears with melancholic love ballads, told fans in 2017 that he was battling pancreatic cancer.

Fans in Miami weren’t the only ones celebrating the legacy of the Mexican great.

Hundreds of people gathered Friday at one of Mexico City’s most famous parks, Alameda Central, to pay homage to the late singer. Fans were seen singing José José’s most famous songs. Some even dressed up as the singer.

As drama between the family spiraled out of control back in the US, many Mexicans worried that there may not be a proper memorial service in Mexico.

The death of José José hit hard in Mexico, which endured the 2016 death of another cherished crooner from the same era: Juan Gabriel.

And all of this played out just days after a seemingly broken family came together to celebrate the pop icon.

The drama started just days after the singer’s death when two siblings, José Joel and Marysol, accused their half-sister, Sarita, of hiding their father’s body.

The relationship between the two oldest siblings and José José’s youngest – Sarita Sosa – has been strained, particularly since the late crooner’s announcement in 2017 that he was suffering from pancreatic cancer, which prompted Sarita to move to Miami, drawing accusations of trying to profit from his legacy.

“We have every right to see my dad,” Marysol said to TV Azteca. “My half sister has a lot to explain to me and to all of Mexico. “Please, wherever you are, get in touch with us. I’ve been talking to you all day and I’m here, and I’ve been telling you since yesterday: I see my dad’s body, or I don’t believe anything.”

Whatever differences these siblings once shared seemed to have blown over in the wake of their father’s memorial services.

And it looks like the drama continues, as the family decides what to do with the singer’s remains.

The posthumous homecoming ceremony for José José in his native Mexico is caught up in a family conflict over the singer’s remains that are still in Miami, where he lived for decades.

José Joel Sosa said on Monday that he and his sister halted their father’s cremation because they wanted the entire body for the Mexico City memorial service. His other daughter in Miami, Sarita Sosa, said José José wanted half of his ashes to stay in Florida and the other to go to Mexico.

However, as of Wednesday, news reports indicated that the late-singer had already been cremated and half of his ashes would likely arrive in Mexico later in the day.

Telemundo reports that José José’s ashes will be divided among his three children – Marysol and José Joel from his second marriage to Ana Elena Noreña and Sarita from his third to Sara Salazar.

José José will be honored in a special memorial in Mexico City on Wednesday, where a portion of his ashes will be displayed for his fans and family to pay tribute.

It’s been an uphill battle for Marysol and José Joel, who tried to prevent their father’s cremation. The brother and sister wanted the singer’s body to be present for the Mexican memorial service and to be laid to rest in his native country. José Joel even pleaded to his late father’s wife, Salazar, and his step-sister a day before the cremation during an interview with Univision to stop the process and let his body rest in Mexico.

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This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

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This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

via Getty Images

In the town of Ayahualtempa, Mexico, in the state of Guerrero, reporters see a shocking image whenever they visit. Children armed with guns, trained to defend themselves. The disturbing scene is meant to be shocking. The village of Ayahualtempa is under constant attack. A prominent heroin “corridor”, they are the victims of violence and carnage at the hands of gangsters and the cartel.

In order to gain the Mexican government’s attention, the Ayahualtempa villagers dress their children up as soldiers. Then, they invite the media in.

Ayahualtempa
via Getty Images

When reporters arrive, the children of Ayahualtempa dutifully line up and put on a performance. They march, they show how they would shoot a gun from one knee, or from flat on their bellies. They tell reporters that their mock-violent performance is “so the president sees us and helps us,” as a 12-year-old child named Valentín told the Associated Press.

Because the Mexican government doesn’t protect Ayahualtempa, the display of child soldiers is a form of protest for the small indigenous village. The people of this remote region of Guerrero want protection from the National Guard, and financial help for widows and orphans who have been made so from organized crime.

The villagers don’t trust local authorities, and for good reason. Guerrera is the Mexican state in which 43 teaching students were abducted and killed in an event that is known as the “Iguala mass kidnapping”. Authorities arrested 80 suspects in connection to the event. 44 of them were police officers, working in conjunction with a network of cartels.

Although the demonstrations function largely as a publicity stunt, violence is very much a part of these children’s lives.

via Getty Images

Parents train their children to walk to school with loaded guns, ready to defend themselves against violent gangsters.

The attention-grabbing antics have, to some extent, worked. On one occasion, the government donated some housing material. On another, benefactors gave the community’s orphans and widows scholarships and houses. But as soon as the periodic media storms die down, the federal government continues pretending Ayahualtempa doesn’t exist.

The hypocrisy of the government’s response is frustrating to many. “We’ve normalized that these children don’t eat, are illiterate, are farm workers. We’re used to the Indians dying young, but, ‘How dare they arm them!’” said local human rights activist Abel Barrera to the AP, with a heavy dose of sarcasm.

As for now, until the government moves to protect the community, they say they will continue their demonstrations. “They see that the issue of the children is effective for making people take notice and they think: If that’s what works, we’ll have to keep doing it,” said Barrera.

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Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Entertainment

Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Pokémon fans in Latin America are mourning the death of Diana Pérez, the Spanish-language voice of Jessie of Pokémon’s Team Rocket. The voice actress has been voicing the character since 1997.

Diana Pérez, the voice actress of Team Rocket’s Jessie, died at 51.

Lalo Garza, a famed voice actor in Mexico, confirmed the death of the Pokémon voice actress.

“Rest in peace Diana Pérez, a strong, cultured, intelligent, and very talented woman. You are good now, friend. Nothing hurts anymore. Have a good trip,” reads the tweet.

Pérez has been a staple in the Spanish-language Pokémon fandom for decades.

Pérez was more than just he voice of Jessie. The voice actress was the voice of multiple anime characters including Luffy in One Piece and Kagura in Inuyasha. In recent years, Pérez had started branching out to directing, producing, and other branches in the entertainment industry.

Pérez’s death is being mourned by Pokémon fans outside of the Spanish-language fandom.

Sarah Natochenny is the English voice of Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon series, Jessie’s mortal enemy. The death of Pérez has impacted the larger Pokémon community. Pérez was a pivotal part of the Latin American Pokémon community for decades and her loss has devastated fans.

Descansa en paz, Diana.

There have been no plans announced for a replacement to voice Team Rocket’s Jessie. No official cause of death has been released either. Our hearts and thoughts go out to Pérez’s family and the greater Pokémon community mourning her passing.

READ: I Was Today Years Old When I Found Out This Mexican Pokémon

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