entertainment

Here Are Some Of The Afro-Latinos Who Continue To Impact The Music Industry

amaralanegraaln / princessnokia / Instagram

These stellar musicians and artists are showing the beats, language and fashion of their Afro-Latino roots through a variety of music styles. Celebrate Black History Month by getting to know these eight influential Afro-Latino musicians.

1. Oscar D’Leon

When you’re dancing salsa classics such as “Llorarás” or  “Qué bueno baila usted” with your familia at your prima’s wedding, thank salsa grand maestro Oscar D’Leon. The Venezuelan salsa singer has been singing his way to the top of the salsa charts for decades, and his mega-watt smile is also a welcomed asset to Operation Smile, of which he is an ambassador for.

2. Ozuna

One of the most popular reggaetoneros who is having a major 🔥 moment right now is Puerto Rican reggaeton and Latin trip artist, Juan Carlos Ozuna Rosado, aka Ozuna. He recently made history for the Billboard Latin Music Awards by being nominated for 23 awards, the most of any Latin artist thus far. Catch him on nominated tracks including “Taki Taki” and “Te Boté.”

3. Chocquibtown

Colombian hip-hop group Chocquibtown might be under the radar to some music enthusiasts, but the group is internationally-acclaimed and award-winning, so they’re moving like the silent g in lasagna.

The group’s name pays homage to the Colombian department of Chocó, which has many inhabitants of African descent.

4. Vakeró

Manuel Varet Marte, known by his stage name, Vakeró, is an urban Latin artist from the Dominican Republic. He has told Billboard he is proud to be associated with the African part of his Afro-Latino roots, saying in Spanish to call him “negro”, not “moreno.” Don’t get it twisted.

5. Ibeyi2

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This French, Afro-Cuban and Venezuelan duo mixes electronic beats with hip-hop, piano, a little bit of French and a side of Yoruba (a language brought to Cuba from West African slaves.) Equally stunning and talented Ibeyi2 is probably best known for being in Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ special on HBO. Now that is what you call #BlackGirlMagic.

6. Princess Nokia

This Afro-Puerto Rican rapper is giving rap music the royal treatment. Her brand of feminism is both on display through her lyrics AND her activism. This go-getter is both a founder of Smart Girls Club AND recently announced she would be starting her own YouTube channel to promote self care, wellness and beauty. YES, QUEEN. YYESSSS!!

7. Amara la Negra

Afro-Dominican singer Amara la Negra has been a fixture in Latino households since she was a child. First she appeared on TV on the classic show, Sábado Gigante, and now she is scoring millions of views through YouTube and was a recognizable face on Love & Hip Hop: Miami. She is using the insults people have thrown at her for not being Latina enough, or not being black enough, and showing that Afro-Latinos ARE enough. She told Rolling Stone in a recent interview, Somewhere along the way, I started to feel this energy in my body – this need to empower other women, this need to liberate people. This need to talk.” And now people are definitely listening through her music.

8. Celia Cruz

The absolute, unquestionable QUEEN of salsa is and always will be the beloved Celia Cruz. Perhaps the first Afro-Latin artist to break through the class ceiling of identity and showcase to the world what it means to be black and talented, Celia Cruz put her country of Cuba and her style of salsa on the map. Her legacy continues on to this day, with musicians still revering her as one of the greatest Latina singers OF ALL TIME.

Did we miss any of your favorite Afro-Latino musicians? Let us know in the comments!!

This Conservative Black Reporter Tells Amara La Negra She’d Be Doing Way Better If She Didn’t Claim Her Afro Roots

Entertainment

This Conservative Black Reporter Tells Amara La Negra She’d Be Doing Way Better If She Didn’t Claim Her Afro Roots

@amaralanegraaln

Recently, Amara La Negra was forced to try to convince Black conservative and “The Fallen State” host Jesse Lee Peterson that Black people exist.

Those of you who aware Jesse Lee Peterson’s existence will know that he has long been problematic and extremely self-hating. The Black conservative is known for his membership of  Choose Black America, an organization of African Americans against undocumented immigration to the United States, and has long accused Black people of being “mentally retarded.” He has also thanked God for creating slavery.

Whether or not rapper Amara La Negra knew this before going onto his show has yet to be established, but we do know that she got an up and close experience on his buffoonery recently.

Amara recently sat down with Peterson, for god knows what reason, to talk about Afro-Latinidad.

(Spoiler alert: he learned nothing.)

Speaking with Amara the host questioned her about her identity and the meaning of the term Afro-Latino.”

“Now that I see you in person you don’t look like a Black person? You look like a dark-skinned Latina or something like that, right?” he asked before quickly following up with “Why would you want to call yourself Afro-Latina?

Um what???

Amara was visibly caught off guard by his words and replied “You’re terrible,” as she laughed.

Peterson, who clearly felt as if he had not said enough, continued.

“Black people are so negative. There’s nothing really good about being an Afro,” He said. “And they pretend to be Afro-Americans when really they are Americans. They wouldn’t even recognize Africa if it drove down the road past them. It’s such a negative thing why would you want to present yourself– because you’re 100% Latina- why would you want to present yourself with the AFro thing. What’s the purpose?”

When Peterson asked Amara what an Afro-Latina looked like she proudly pointed to herself as an example.

@amaralanegraaln / Instagram

Despite Peterson attempting to dissuade Amara from using herself as an example of what a Black person looks like she refused. “I am very Dominican, I am very Latina. I am very Black as well,” she insisted.

“What does an African-American woman look like?” She asked him. “Like me.”

Still, Peterson quickly interrupted Amara saying, “There’s no such thing as an Afro-American woman, they made that up. They are Americans they were born here but they are dumb and so they are calling themselves African Americans because they don’t think for themselves. Jesse Jackson told them to think for themselves. So why would a woman like you so talented, you dont even look like them, why would you want to attach them to your name? You would do much better and sooner if you didn’t have the AFro Latina.”

Amara was quick to cut Peterson off saying that she loved her melanin.

“No, no, no no, I will always be an Afro-Latina. And that is why I am an activist, I love my background I love my melanin I love my race and I feel that is even more of a reason why my name is Amara La Negra.

Watch the full episode below!

This Elementary School Held A Flash Mob Where Kids Dressed Up And Danced To Selena And Celia Cruz And I’m Crying At My Desk

Culture

This Elementary School Held A Flash Mob Where Kids Dressed Up And Danced To Selena And Celia Cruz And I’m Crying At My Desk

The fear of losing our Latinidad as our kids learn to assimilate to American culture is very real. As new and older generations come and go, younger Latinos born in the U.S. are less likely to speak Spanish, and know how to cook certain recipes or the moves of certain dances. Fortunately, one elementary located in the city of Los Angeles, California is taking literal steps and classes to ensure la cultura never dies.

In a recent post to the elementary school’s Facebook page, little kids are seen putting on a performance of Selena’s “La Caracha.”

[Click the image to watch the video]

In the video posted to Facebook, dozens of kindergarten students from Euclid Avenue Elementary are seen dancing along to “La Carcacha.” While the boys wear leather vests, the girls are suited up in outfits that channel Selena’s purple jumpsuit.

But the display of vida did NOT stop there.

The event soon turned into a display of Afro-Latina celebration when the school’s second graders turned up for Celia Cruz

Like just LOOK at all of those little Celia’s in training dancing to “La Vida Es Un Carnaval.”

And because the party could just not stop the school’s First Graders danced to “Un Poco Loco” from Coco.

Honestly, my heart is about to burst watching these little guys expertly dance to the “Coco” theme song. And not only are the kids wearing the sweetest traditional outfits the little boys are wearing fake guitars!!!!

Guys!! And The Third Graders Dance the Tarantela!

And there goes my heart. Bursting into a million little pieces and being simultaneously full again.

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